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The New York Public Library Podcast features your favorite writers, artists, and thinkers in smart talks and provocative conversations.

A beacon of books, ideas, and education in a city described as the cultural capital of the world, the Library hosts more than 55,000 programs annually. Listen to some of the most engaging and memorable recent programs, discover new ideas, and celebrate the best of today’s culture.

Find us on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud.

Podcast #152: Casanova: Seduction and Genius in Venice

For this week's episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present Laurence Bergreen in conversation with psychosexual therapist Dr. Ruth Westheimer on the life of the notorious Casanova.Read More ›

Podcast #151: Hugh Ryan on the Queer Histories of Brooklyn's Waterfront

Hugh Ryan is a curator and journalist based in Brooklyn, whose work primarily explores queer culture and history. For this week's episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present Ryan discussing the complicated queer refuges offered by the borough's waterfront spaces. Read More ›

Podcast #150: Emmett Till: True Stories of An American Tragedy

For this episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present historian Timothy Tyson and PEN Award–winning author John Edgar Wideman discussing their new books, The Blood of Emmett Till and Writing to Save a Life, with historian Nell Irvin Painter, author of the New York Times bestseller The History of White People.Read More ›

Podcast #149: George Washington and the Hyper-Partisan Now

In 1796, George Washington gave his farewell address as he left the American presidency. His speech warned against the dangers of partisanship and made the case for unity across the country.Read More ›

Podcast #148: New York Never Built

For this week's episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, internationally acclaimed architects Daniel Libeskind, Steven Holl, and Elizabeth Diller come together with author Sam Lubell to envision this alternate city. Read More ›

Podcast #147: Art Spiegelman on How He Sees Himself, Becoming a Devotee to Another Artist, and the Artist After Art

Art Spiegelman is the author and illustrator of Maus, the first graphic novel to win a Pulitzer Prize. He came to the New York Public Library in the fall of 2016 to discuss the republication of Si Lewen's wordless book, The Parade. For this week of the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present Art Spiegelman on how he sees himself, becoming a devotee to another artist, and the artist after art.Read More ›

Podcast #146: Our Compelling Interests: A Panel on Diversity and Democracy

For this week's episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present Lehrer, Ifill, Young, Contreras-Sweet, Marx, Gelinas, and Cantor discussing our compelling interests in diverse democracy.Read More ›

Podcast #145: Rebecca Solnit, Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, Garnette Cadogan, Suketu Mehta, and Luc Sante on Phone Maps, Libraries, and Walking

For this week's episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present these mapmakers discussing phone maps, libraries, and walking through cities.Read More ›

Podcast #144: Michael Chabon and Richard Price on Plot, Secular Judaism, and Remembering to Make Stuff Up

For this week's episode, we're proud to present Michael Chabon and Richard Price discussing plot, feeling his way toward secular Judaism, and remembering to make stuff up.Read More ›

Podcast #143: Neil Gaiman Reads "A Christmas Carol" (Rebroadcast)

Neil Gaiman reads from the only surviving "prompt" copy of the book, that is, Dickens's own annotated version used for live readings.Read More ›

Podcast #142: Paul Krugman on Fake News, Lying Candidates, and What Public Intellectuals Need to Do

Paul Krugman is a Nobel Prize-winning economist and beloved columnist for the New York Times. A prolific writer, he has published books for both an academic and general audience, including End This Depression Now!, The Conscience of a Liberal, and The Self-Organizing Economy. For this week's episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present Paul Krugman discussing fake news, lying candidates, and what public intellectuals need to do.Read More ›

Podcast #141: James McBride on James Brown and NYC

For this week's episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present James McBride discussing James Brown's creative process, the politics of the musician, and New York City.Read More ›

Podcast #140: Sarah Sze on Scale, Gravity, and Value

Sarah Sze is a visual artist best known for challenging the boundaries of sculpture, painting, and architecture. She is a Macarthur Fellow and has shown at museums around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum, and the Guggenheim Museum. This week for the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present Sze discussing scale, gravity, and value in her work.Read More ›

Podcast #139: Robbie Robertson on Six Nations Inspiration, Bob Dylan, and Goals of the Soul

Robbie Robertson, joined in conversation by Steven Van Zandt, a founding member of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band and a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Read More ›

Podcast #138: Wole Soyinka on Hollywood, Reparations, and Morgan Freeman

Wole Soyinka is the first African Nobel Prize winner in literature. A writer of prose, poetry, and drama, Soyinka has brought political engagement to the forefront of his work, levying wide-ranging critiques, ranging from apartheid to corruption in the government of Shehu Shagari. For this week's episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present Wole Soyinka discussing reparations, Hollywood, and being mistaken for Morgan Freeman.Read More ›

Podcast #137: Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Margo Jefferson on Understanding Uncle Tom's Cabin

Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Margo Jefferson are two of the finest intellectuals in our country today. Gates, a MacArthur Fellow, and Jefferson, a Pulitzer-Prize winner, share a deep interest in Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin. In 2006, Gates and Jefferson sat down at the Library for a special event on the novel co-presented with The Studio Museum in Harlem. While initially praised by the likes of Frederick Douglass, its eponymous character has also at times been linked with an insulting vision of black masculinity and, more recently, has been recuperated by some feminist scholars. For Read More ›

Podcast #136: Marina Abramović and Debbie Harry on Doubt and Diaries

Marina Abramović is one of the most celebrated performance artists alive today. For this week's episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, she joined Debbie Harry, the frontwoman for Blondie, to discuss reaching new audiences, diary writing, and doubt. Read More ›

Podcast #135: Tim Wu on How the Internet Is Not Really Free

For this week's episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present Tim Wu discussing the internet, attention, and the problem with free stuff.Read More ›

Podcast #134: Margaret Atwood on Shakespeare in the 21st Century and on YouTube

Margaret Atwood is one of the most prolific Canadian writers alive today, working both in prose and poetry. In a career spanning over four decades, Atwood has won the Booker Prize and earned a Guggenheim. She is best known for novels such as The Handmaid's Tale and The Blind Assassin. For this week's episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present Atwood discussing how she brought Shakespeare into a twenty-first century context, memorizing poetry, and what YouTube can tell us about the Bard.Read More ›

Podcast #133: Mona Eltahawy and Yasmine El Rashidi on White Feminism and the Privilege to Protest

Mona Eltahawy is the author of Headscarves and Hymens: Why the Middle East Needs a Sexual Revolution. Recently, she joined Yasmine El Rashidi, the author of Chronicle of a Last Summer: A Novel of Egypt and a Cullman fellow, for an event at LIVE from the NYPL. For this week's episode of the New York Public Library, we're proud to present Eltahawy and El Rashidi discussing white feminism, the privilege to protest, and claiming one's voice.Read More ›
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