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Frankenstein and the Afterlife of Shelley’s Circle, the second edition of NYPL's collections-based app Biblion, shows how the questions we ask ourselves everyday — about technology, prejudice, gender — are all contained in a classic work of literature: Mary Shelley's 200 year old novel Frankenstein.


In Biblion, you'll how the same ideas get remixed over time, and how the classics continue to inspire and inform the world around us. Articles from experts and inspiring thinkers are paired with more than 550 photographs, prints, and maps from the unparalleled collections of The New York Public Library.

Plus, each article is linked to one of more than 750 pages of original source documents including the entire original handwritten draft of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, begun in 1816. We've paired this manuscript with a transcript of the novel's 1831 edition so you can toggle the published transcript over the original draft to see how Shelley changed and developed this classic work over time. 

Biblion: Frankenstein also includes new social reading features that allow you to participate in conversations about big ideas, vote on polls, and create new questions for other readers.

Download the groundbreaking iPad app from The New York Public Library, launching June 7, 2012

Or, browse the edition online

Backstage at LIVE from the NYPL, with The Daily Beast

Go Backstage at LIVE from the NYPL... with The Daily Beast!

September 21, 2009 (All day)
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Backstage at LIVE from the NYPL, with The Daily Beast Image
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Art
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Language and Literature
Performing Arts
Science
Social Sciences
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September 21, 2009

LIVE Shorts

LIVE from the NYPL programs are long on intellectual content, but these “LIVE Shorts” videos provide short bites suggesting a flavor of the full program.

September 16, 2008 (All day)
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June 1, 2009

LIVE from the NYPL

Flash Rosenberg is a freelance photographer and artist-in-residence for LIVE from the NYPL. She draws discussions in front of live audiences to create real time “Conversation Portraits.” These drawings are an amorphous portrait of what it feels like to translate complex ideas into simple lines. She squeezes 90-minute blabs into five- to eight-minute animations, edited by Sarah Lohman.

LIVE Conversation Portraits

Flash Rosenberg is a freelance photographer and artist-in-residence for LIVE from the NYPL. She draws discussions in front of live audiences to create real time “Conversation Portraits.” These drawings are an amorphous portrait of what it feels like to translate complex ideas into simple lines. She squeezes 90-minute blabs into five- to eight-minute animations, edited by Sarah Lohman.

May 13, 2008 (All day)
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Reference
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History of North America
United States History
History of the Middle East
History of Europe
Language and Literature
English and American Literature
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June 1, 2009

BOBBI BECK: UNMASKED An exhibit of autobiographical artworks

HISS by Bobbi BeckWe all wear different masks everyday depending on what we think is in store for us as we move through our lives. All of the pictures in this exhibition reveal Bobbi Beck’s inner world expressing common feelings and emotions we constantly face. Each picture focuses on a unique aspect of life that also probably have at one point or another been part of your own personal narrative. Her intriguing and telling compositions are cloaked with symbols, decorative elements, anthropomorphic figures, historical references and mythology, all converging in her mind’s eye and then mirroring back at the viewer. As an admirer of art and design from various cultures and histories she weaves those complex visual elements into each and every piece that she creates. This collection of completely original artworks have been described by viewers as possessing hints of Dali, Escher, Beardsley, Mucha and even Gaudi. In these strange and exotic compositions, everything seems to merge together and then suddenly explode back at us, as human forms twist, warp and morph with everyday objects, animals, machinery and any other visual fodder that catches her attention while she is working. Bobbi’s latest exhibition can now be seen at the Morningside Heights Library just adjacent to Columbia University. So come visit this thought-provoking exhibition to take a visual journey by looking into these picture mirrors and see if you can see any of yourself reflected in Bobbi Beck’s art. 

EXHIBITION VISITORS’ COMMENTS: “Your art is good for the heart, the soul and the silly space we sometimes back ourselves into as human beings.” “Exotic and mysterious.” “I am a young artist and although art is my passion there are not many art pieces besides my own that I can relate to and identify with. Bobbi Beck’s art is so inspiring to me. She is my favorite living artist.” “All of your work expresses different aspects of life.” “You have a gift, not just technically but as a poet.” “Freud would have a field day with you my dear. Your work is amazing and coupled with the ability to express it visually is a gift to us all.”   

TO READ MORE ABOUT BOBBI BECK’S ART PLEASE VISIT –

Open now. Ends October 29th, 2016.

BOBBI BECK: UNMASKED An exhibit of autobiographical artworks

We all wear different masks everyday depending on what we think is in store for us as we move through our lives. All of the pictures in this exhibition reveal Bobbi Beck’s inner world expressing common feelings and emotions we constantly face. Each picture focuses on a unique aspect of life that also probably have at one point or another been part of your own personal narrative. Her intriguing and telling compositions are cloaked with symbols, decorative elements, anthropomorphic figures, historical references and mythology, all converging in her mind’s eye and then mirroring back at the viewer. As an admirer of art and design from various cultures and histories she weaves those complex visual elements into each and every piece that she creates. This collection of completely original artworks have been described by viewers as possessing hints of Dali, Escher, Beardsley, Mucha and even Gaudi. In these strange and exotic compositions, everything seems to merge together and then suddenly explode back at us, as human forms twist, warp and morph with everyday objects, animals, machinery and any other visual fodder that catches her attention while she is working. Bobbi’s latest exhibition can now be seen at the Morningside Heights Library just adjacent to Columbia University. So come visit this thought-provoking exhibition to take a visual journey by looking into these picture mirrors and see if you can see any of yourself reflected in Bobbi Beck’s art. 

 

 
EXHIBITION VISITORS’ COMMENTS: “Your art is good for the heart, the soul and the silly space we sometimes back ourselves into as human beings.” “Exotic and mysterious.” “I am a young artist and although art is my passion there are not many art pieces besides my own that I can relate to and identify with. Bobbi Beck’s art is so inspiring to me. She is my favorite living artist.” “All of your work expresses different aspects of life.” “You have a gift, not just technically but as a poet.” “Freud would have a field day with you my dear. Your work is amazing and coupled with the ability to express it visually is a gift to us all.”   
 

 

TO READ MORE ABOUT BOBBI BECK’S ART PLEASE VISIT –



 

Open now. Ends October 28th, 2016.

The National Museum of African American History & Culture opens on September 24, 2016. The Smithsonian has decided to name the celebration “Lift Every Voice,” borrowing the phrase from the song known as America’s Black National Anthem.

Frequently Asked Questions 

Line drawing of women; Goncharova
Line drawing, 1920; Natalia Goncharova.
  1. Do I need an appointment or a library card to access your collections?  In general, no appointment is necessary to access our collections. However, some items may be off-site or restricted for various reasons. Prior to your visit, we strongly suggest that you carefully read and follow the tips outlined in the Plan Your Research Visit guide.  And yes, you will need a library card to access all of our materials. You can apply for a card here.

  2. How do I request the item I want?  If the location is listed in the Research Catalog as “Performing Arts Research Collections - Dance” and “AVAILABLE” then the item is held onsite and no advance request is required.  For onsite items, make your request when you visit by filling out a paper call slip at the Print Delivery Desk on the 3rd floor of the Library for the Performing Arts.  You will need to contact the Division at dance@nypl.org in advance of your visit if you see any of the following messages in the catalog record:

    • “Check w/ Staff”

    • “Permit needed”

    • “Preservation”

    • “By Appt Only”

  3. How do I request materials indicated as OFFSITE in the catalog?  If the location of the item you wish to consult is listed as “OFFSITE” in the research catalog, you can either follow the link to request it or you can find further ordering instructions hereIf the location given is “OFFSITE ROSE”, you can either follow the link to request it or proceed directly to this formOff-site requests should be made at least 72 hours in advance of your visit.

  4. May I take photos or get copies of your materials?  You are welcome to use your own digital camera (without flash or tripod) to photograph most items for your own personal research use during your visit. Some material may not be copied or scanned because of fragility or donor restrictions. If you would like to order low-resolution reproductions for research or high-resolution reproductions for publication or other projects, the library can provide images. Please visit the Copies and Reproductions page for more information.

  5. Can I purchase copies of moving image or audio materials?  We regret that we are unable to provide copies for private screenings, off-site classroom screenings, or research or personal use. As we do not own all rights in our collections, our moving image and audio recordings are generally not available to be consulted outside the Library’s reading room, nor can they be loaned or sold.

  6. Are your collections digitized and available online?  Only a small portion of the Jerome Robbins Dance Division’s collections are digitized and available online in the Digital Collections portal. Many of the digitized materials, especially moving image and audio recordings, are restricted to consult only at the Library for the Performing Arts. However, the digitized materials in the public domain or for which the NYPL holds copyright are viewable from anywhere. We are adding new material to this site regularly.

  7. A moment from the Rhapsody in Blue ballet, photograph
    A moment from the Rhapsody in Blue ballet, Dance Magazine 1929; White Studio

    Do you offer class or group orientations to your collections?  Yes, we welcome the chance to introduce our collections to students and other groups. If you are interested, please contact us well in advance of the date you wish to visit at dance@nypl.org

  8. What if I have something to donate?  We welcome inquiries about donating rare or unique materials that fit our collecting guidelines. Unfortunately, the Jerome Robbins Dance Division can no longer accept donations of clippings, playbills already in our collections, or most books and periodicals. For more information, please contact the Division directly at dance@nypl.org.

  9. Can you recommend resources I can use to archive my own materials?  The Dance Heritage Coalition provides an online resource called the Artist’s Legacy Toolkit to help artists organize their materials at any stage in their career: http://www.danceheritage.org/artisttoolkit.html.

  10. What if I still have questions?  If your question has not been answered here, please contact the Jerome Robbins Dance Division directly at dance@nypl.org or reference staff at the information desk on the 3rd floor can further assist you in your research.

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