Research Catalog

  • Stewed prunes (Revue) : photograph, 1960.

    • Text
    • 1 item
    AccessStatusCall NumberLocation
    Supervised useAvailable*T-Pho B (Stewed prunes (Revue))Performing Arts Research Collections - Theatre
  • The Cock-crowing at the approach of a free-parliament, or, Good newes in a ballat more sweet to your palat, then figge, raison or stewed prune is [electronic resource] / a countrey wit made it who ne'r got by th' trade yet, and Mad Tom of Bedlam the tune is.

    • Text
    • [S.l. : s.n., 1659]
    • 1659
    • 1 resource

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  • Flagellum: or, a dry answer to Dr. Hancock's wonderfully-comical liquid book, [electronic resource] : which he merrily calls Febrifugum magnum, or common water the best cure for fevers, &c. (a Book proved beyond Contradiction, to be wrote when the Doctor was asleep.) Wherein, Not only many obscure Passages, in that great Performance (which neither the Doctor nor any body else understood the meaning of) are ironically explain'd to the meanest Capacity; but the Use and Excellency of cold Water and stewed Prunes, is also clear'd up, beyond Contradiction. Very fit to be bound up with the Doctor's Book. By Gabriel John, a seventh son, and teacher of the occult sciences in Yorkshire.

    • Text
    • London : printed, and sold by Tho. Warner at the Black-Boy in Pater-Noster-Row, [1723]
    • 1723
    • 1 resource

    Available Online

    Full text online available from home with a valid library card and onsite at NYPL
  • Flagellum: or, a dry answer to Dr. Hancock's wonderfully-comical liquid book, [electronic resource] : which he merrily calls Febrifugum magnum, or common water the best cure for fevers, &c. (a Book proved beyond Contradiction, to be wrote when the Doctor was asleep.) Wherein Not only many obscure Passages, in that great Performance (which neither the Doctor nor any body else understood the meaning of) are ironically explain'd to the meanest Capacity; but the Use and Excellency of cold Water and stewed Prunes, is also clear'd up. Very fit to be bound up with the Doctor's Book. The second edition: with a postscript, containing a few merry reflections on a late bombastick pamphlet in defence of the doctor's book, wrote by one Tom Taylor, the first-born of all the Sons of Stupidity, and Bull-Rider to the Bear-Garden. By Gabriel John, a seventh son, and teacher of the occult sciences in Yorkshire.

    • Text
    • London : printed, and sold by Tho. Warner at the Black-Boy in Pater-Noster-Row, [1723]
    • 1723
    • 1 resource

    Available Online

    Full text online available from home with a valid library card and onsite at NYPL

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