Research Catalog

Moorish Science research collection.

Title
Moorish Science research collection.
Author
Bey, Allan Ahmed,
Publication
1789-2007.
Supplementary Content
Finding aid

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StatusVol/DateFormatAccessCall NumberItem Location
box 2Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 827 box 2Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
box 1Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 827 box 1Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives

Details

Additional Authors
Moorish Science Temple of America.
Description
0.67 linear feet (2 boxes)
Subjects
Source (note)
  • Gift of Allan Ahmed Bey, January 2010.
Location of Other Archival Materials (note)
  • Moorish Science Temple of America collection, Sc MG 435, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
Processing Action (note)
  • Processing Information: Accessioned by Nurah-Rosalie Jeter, May 2010.
Call Number
Sc MG 827
Author
Bey, Allan Ahmed, compiler.
Title
Moorish Science research collection.
Production
1789-2007.
Type of Content
text
still image
Type of Medium
unmediated
Type of Carrier
sheet
Summary
This collection consists of materials collected by Allen Ahmed Bey for his research on the Moorish Science Temple in the United States. Included in the collection are legal briefs on the status of Moorish Nation Nationals (citizens) which contain a public declaration of national constitutional immunity. Also included are a number of documents on the history of the Moorish Nation and instructional manuals (lessons) for members.
Moorish Science Temple of America, is an U.S. religious movement founded in Newark, N.J., in 1913 by Timothy Drew (1886–1929), known to followers as Noble Drew Ali and also as the Prophet. Drew Ali taught that all Blacks were of Moorish origins but had their Muslim identity taken away from them through slavery and racial segregation. He advocated that they should return to the Islam of their Moorish forefathers, redeeming themselves from racial oppression by reclaiming their historical spiritual heritage. He also encouraged use of the term Moor rather than Black in self-identification. Many of the group’s formal practices were derived from Muslim observances.
Location of Other Archival Materials
Moorish Science Temple of America collection, Sc MG 435, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
Processing Action
Processing Information: Accessioned by Nurah-Rosalie Jeter, May 2010.
Source
Gift of Allan Ahmed Bey, January 2010.
Connect to:
Finding aid
Added Author
Moorish Science Temple of America.
Research Call Number
Sc MG 827
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