Mesmerist : the society doctor who held Victorian London spellbound

Title
Mesmerist : the society doctor who held Victorian London spellbound / Wendy Moore.
Author
Moore, Wendy, 1952-
Publication
  • London : Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2017.
  • ©2017

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TextUse in libraryRequestJFE 17-7479Schwarzman Building - Main Reading Room 315

Details

Description
308 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations; 24 cm
Genre/Form
Biographies.
Bibliography (note)
  • Includes bibliographical references (pages 263-298) and index.
Call Number
JFE 17-7479
ISBN
  • 9781474602297
  • 1474602290
  • 9781474602303
  • 1474602304
Author
Moore, Wendy, 1952- author.
Title
Mesmerist : the society doctor who held Victorian London spellbound / Wendy Moore.
Publisher
London : Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2017.
Copyright Date
©2017
Type of Content
text
still image
Type of Medium
unmediated
Type of Carrier
volume
Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 263-298) and index.
Summary
Medicine, in the early 1800s, was a brutal business. Operations were performed without anaesthesia while conventional treatment relied on leeches, cupping and toxic potions. The most surgeons could offer by way of pain relief was a large swig of brandy. Onto this scene came John Elliotson, the dazzling new hope of the medical world. Charismatic and ambitious, Elliotson was determined to transform medicine from a hodge-podge of archaic remedies into a practice informed by the latest science. In this aim he was backed by Thomas Wakley, founder of the new magazine, the Lancet, and a campaigner against corruption and malpractice. Then, in the summer of 1837, a French visitor - the self-styled Baron Jules Denis Dupotet - arrived in London to promote an exotic new idea: mesmerism. The mesmerism mania would take the nation by storm but would ultimately split the two friends, and the medical world, asunder - throwing into focus fundamental questions about the fine line between medicine and quackery, between science and superstition.
Research Call Number
JFE 17-7479
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