Research Catalog

(Peling) Jug Ging.

Title
(Peling) Jug Ging. Yungdrung Choeling Drup: Second Day [Close shot] [electronic resource].
Publication
2006.

Available Online

NYPL Digital Collections

Details

Additional Authors
Description
1 digital video file (ca. 41 min.): digital, stereo., H.264 file.
Uniform Title
Bhutan Dance Project, Core of Culture.
Alternative Title
Dance of the Ging with Batons (Peling Tradition). Yungdrung Choeling Drup: Second Day [Close shot]
Subject
Genre/Form
  • Dance.
  • Filmed dance.
  • Filmed performances.
  • Video.
Note
  • For wide shot version, see: *MGZIDF 879A.
  • Yungdrung Choeling Drup: Second Day, Jan. 12, 2006: Atsara Cham (Marchang) - Dance of the Atsaras and Libation ; Peling Shinjey Phomo - Dance of the Lord of Death and his Consort ; Phag Cham - Dance of the Boar ; Peling Nga Cham - Peling Drum Dance ; Nyulemai Cham - The Dance of the Evil Spirit ; (Peling) Jug Ging - Dance of the Ging with Batons ; Durthro Dagmo Chezhi (Durdag) - Dance of the Four Lords of the Charnel Grounds ; (Peling) Dri Ging - Dance of the Ging with Swords ; Zhanag Nga Cham - Dance of the Black Hats with Drums.
Access (note)
  • Open.
Event (note)
  • Videotaped in performance at the Yungdrung Choeling Dzong, in Trongsa, Bhutan (ground level: looking along the left diagonal at the Lhakang across the courtyard), on Jan. 12, 2006.
Source (note)
  • Core of Culture.
Call Number
*MGZIDF 879B
OCLC
854762750
Title
(Peling) Jug Ging. Yungdrung Choeling Drup: Second Day [Close shot] [electronic resource].
Imprint
2006.
Country of Producing Entity
Bhutan.
Series
Bhutan Dance Project, Core of Culture.
Summary
This dance begins during the Zhauli - and the two continue and intermingle together. The Peling Ging-Sum (the three dances of the Ging in the Pema Lingpa tradition) are three dances that are performed around the country in a particular sequence. The Ging-Sum comprises three dances: Jug Ging, Dri Ging and Nga Ging which show the forces of good in direct combat with evil spirits who plague living beings with their constant suasions to commit wrong. Jug means baton or wand and the Jug Ging are spirits tasked to search out the prtesence of evil (using their wands as sensitive instruments to find out the direction in which evil lies). The Dri Ging - who carry swords - subjugate evil with their weapons before punishing and slaying (with compassion) any such evil spirits found. The Nga-ging - who each carry a drum - perform a victory dance at having overcome the evil spirits, and also ensure that even those conquered evil spirits are still prayed for and ultimately liberated from their evil ways. These three dances are considered to have been reveled by Terton Pema Lingpa in the 16th Century - and they are thus known as ter-cham or (revealed) treasure dances. They express a coherent choreographic and dramatic intention on the great Saint s part. They are most often performed together with nyulemai cham (Dance of the Evil Spirit) which serves as an active and visible reference to the existence of evil in the world - and the nyulema is often captured and dispatched by the Jug bearing Ging of the first of these dances.
Access
Open.
Event
Videotaped in performance at the Yungdrung Choeling Dzong, in Trongsa, Bhutan (ground level: looking along the left diagonal at the Lhakang across the courtyard), on Jan. 12, 2006.
Source
Gift; Core of Culture. NN-PD
Connect to:
Local Subject
Ritual and ceremonial dancing -- Bhutan.
Mask dances -- Bhutan.
Animal dances -- Bhutan.
Spirit dances -- Bhutan.
Added Author
Core of Culture (Organization)
Core of Culture. Donor
Added Title
Dance of the Ging with Batons (Peling Tradition). Yungdrung Choeling Drup: Second Day [Close shot]
Research Call Number
*MGZIDF 879B
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