Research Catalog

Nyulemai Cham.

Title
Nyulemai Cham. Yungdrung Choeling Drup: Second Day [Wide shot] [electronic resource].
Publication
2006.

Available Online

NYPL Digital Collections

Details

Additional Authors
Description
1 digital video file (22 min.): digital, stereo., H.264 file.
Uniform Title
Bhutan Dance Project, Core of Culture.
Alternative Title
Dance of the Evil Spirit. Yungdrung Choeling Drup: Second Day [Wide shot]
Subject
Genre/Form
  • Dance.
  • Filmed dance.
  • Filmed performances.
  • Video.
Note
  • For close shot version, see: *MGZIDF 878B.
  • Yungdrung Choeling Drup: Second Day, Jan. 12, 2006: Atsara Cham (Marchang) - Dance of the Atsaras and Libation ; Peling Shinjey Phomo - Dance of the Lord of Death and his Consort ; Phag Cham - Dance of the Boar ; Peling Nga Cham - Peling Drum Dance ; Nyulemai Cham - The Dance of the Evil Spirit ; (Peling) Jug Ging - Dance of the Ging with Batons ; Durthro Dagmo Chezhi (Durdag) - Dance of the Four Lords of the Charnel Grounds ; (Peling) Dri Ging - Dance of the Ging with Swords ; Zhanag Nga Cham - Dance of the Black Hats with Drums.
Access (note)
  • Open.
Event (note)
  • Videotaped in performance at the Yungdrung Choeling Dzong, in Trongsa, Bhutan (looking along the right diagonal towards the Lhakang across the courtyard arena), on Jan. 12, 2006.
Supplement (note)
  • The Dance of the Nyulema - or Evil Spirit - most often precedes the arrival of the Ging (avenging punishers of Evil) who perform three dances as they search out, conquer and celebrate their victory over the nyulema. In this dramatic performance the Evil spirit first tries to win the crowd over to his evil ways - and is ably supported in his antics by the attendant atsaras - who also tease the nyulema mercilessly - much to the crowds delight - with stinging nettles. This clip shows the Nyulema s dance up until the moment he escapes from the Ju-ging who have encircled him whilst he rests. The Nyulema is an Evil spirit and this extended dance dramatises both his methods of creating mischief and his ultimate discovery and capture by the Ging (who are avenging spirits sent to punish those who transgress). Nyulemai Cham is generally performed prior to the Peling Ging Sum - the three dances of the Ging revealed by Terton Pema Lingpa. At first the nyulema dances together with the atsaras, who act as willing accomplices, and interpret his actions to the crowd. His chief goal is to win the spectators over to his evil ways. The nyulema represents something present in every human being: the three poisons (Doksum (dok = poison) and (sum = three)) of Anger, Greed and Ignorance. He plays to the crowd of spectators on each of the four sides of the arena, promising to give them whatever they want - and feigning to give them food and drink in order to win them over. Eventually, he builds a fence around them to fence them in, since he wishes to make them all part of his retinue. Finally he lies down in the middle of the ground - happy at all the mischief he has done and all the souls he has won over to help him. At this point the Peling Ging-Sum begins, comprising three dances: Ju-ging, Dri-ging and Nga-ging which show the forces of good in direct combat with the evil spirit. Ju means baton or wand and the Ju-ging are spirits tasked to search out the roots of evil (using their wands as sensitive instruments to find out the direction in which evil lies). The Dri-ging - who carry swords - subjugate evil with their weapons before punishing and slaying (with compassion) any evil spirits found. The Nga-ging - who each carry a drum - perform a victory dance at having overcome the evil spirit, and also ensure that even those conquered evil spirits are still prayed for and ultimately liberated from their evil ways. The Nyulema is pursued by the fearsome gings, until he is eventually captured. The evil spirit can only escape from the encircling ging by breaking out between the champon and chamjug.
Source (note)
  • Core of Culture.
Call Number
*MGZIDF 878A
OCLC
854762151
Title
Nyulemai Cham. Yungdrung Choeling Drup: Second Day [Wide shot] [electronic resource].
Imprint
2006.
Country of Producing Entity
Bhutan.
Series
Bhutan Dance Project, Core of Culture.
Supplement
The Dance of the Nyulema - or Evil Spirit - most often precedes the arrival of the Ging (avenging punishers of Evil) who perform three dances as they search out, conquer and celebrate their victory over the nyulema. In this dramatic performance the Evil spirit first tries to win the crowd over to his evil ways - and is ably supported in his antics by the attendant atsaras - who also tease the nyulema mercilessly - much to the crowds delight - with stinging nettles. This clip shows the Nyulema s dance up until the moment he escapes from the Ju-ging who have encircled him whilst he rests. The Nyulema is an Evil spirit and this extended dance dramatises both his methods of creating mischief and his ultimate discovery and capture by the Ging (who are avenging spirits sent to punish those who transgress). Nyulemai Cham is generally performed prior to the Peling Ging Sum - the three dances of the Ging revealed by Terton Pema Lingpa. At first the nyulema dances together with the atsaras, who act as willing accomplices, and interpret his actions to the crowd. His chief goal is to win the spectators over to his evil ways. The nyulema represents something present in every human being: the three poisons (Doksum (dok = poison) and (sum = three)) of Anger, Greed and Ignorance. He plays to the crowd of spectators on each of the four sides of the arena, promising to give them whatever they want - and feigning to give them food and drink in order to win them over. Eventually, he builds a fence around them to fence them in, since he wishes to make them all part of his retinue. Finally he lies down in the middle of the ground - happy at all the mischief he has done and all the souls he has won over to help him. At this point the Peling Ging-Sum begins, comprising three dances: Ju-ging, Dri-ging and Nga-ging which show the forces of good in direct combat with the evil spirit. Ju means baton or wand and the Ju-ging are spirits tasked to search out the roots of evil (using their wands as sensitive instruments to find out the direction in which evil lies). The Dri-ging - who carry swords - subjugate evil with their weapons before punishing and slaying (with compassion) any evil spirits found. The Nga-ging - who each carry a drum - perform a victory dance at having overcome the evil spirit, and also ensure that even those conquered evil spirits are still prayed for and ultimately liberated from their evil ways. The Nyulema is pursued by the fearsome gings, until he is eventually captured. The evil spirit can only escape from the encircling ging by breaking out between the champon and chamjug.
Access
Open.
Event
Videotaped in performance at the Yungdrung Choeling Dzong, in Trongsa, Bhutan (looking along the right diagonal towards the Lhakang across the courtyard arena), on Jan. 12, 2006.
Source
Gift; Core of Culture. NN-PD
Connect to:
Local Subject
Ritual and ceremonial dancing -- Bhutan.
Mask dances -- Bhutan.
Spirit dances -- Bhutan.
Added Author
Core of Culture (Organization)
Core of Culture. Donor
Added Title
Dance of the Evil Spirit. Yungdrung Choeling Drup: Second Day [Wide shot]
Research Call Number
*MGZIDF 878A
View in Legacy Catalog