Research Catalog

(Peling) Dri Ging.

Title
(Peling) Dri Ging. Ura Yakchoe: 3rd Day of Festival [Close shot] [electronic resource].
Publication
2005.

Available Online

NYPL Digital Collections

Details

Additional Authors
Description
1 digital video file (25 min.): digital, stereo., H.264 file.
Uniform Title
Bhutan Dance Project, Core of Culture.
Alternative Title
Dance of the Ging with Swords (Peling Tradition). Ura Yakchoe: 3rd Day of Festival [Close shot]
Subject
Genre/Form
  • Dance.
  • Filmed dance.
  • Filmed performances.
  • Video.
Note
  • For wide shot version, see: *MGZIDF 843A.
  • Programme of the Ura Yakchoe: Day Three: April 23, 2005: 3:30 am: Wake up call - The lama and the monks are woken up by the Gathpo clown, by a monk blowing the Jaling (oboe) and by singing girls -- 4:30 am: The morning ritual The lama and the priests assemble to perform the sadhana ceremony of Vajrapani and the invocation of Padmasambhava within the temple -- 8:00 am: Public call & Invocation of War Deity The monks perform monastic music on the temple roof to summon the village to the temple ground. The villagers will begin their breakfast round and at this time the supplication of the war deity by the clowns (To Dala) takes place -- 9:00 am: Fetching of Masks The monks performing mask dance bring the masks needed for the day from the upper shrine room -- 10:00 am: Lunch The priests have their early lunch -- 11:00 am: Beginning of Masked Dances and Folk Dances From 11 am, the monks perform mask dances and the village girls perform folk dances alternately. These Masked dances include: Chungzhi - (The Garuda and Damsi dance), Thowachu - (The dance of the ten Wrathful Deities), Durdag - (The dance of the four guardians of the gates), Ging Tang Tsholing - (The Tsholing and Ging dance), Ju-ging, Dri ging, Nga ging -- 3:00 pm: Tea Offering The public joins the monks in the temple to have tea sponsored by the individual units of the village -- 4:00 pm: Pholey Moley - The Drama of Handsome Men and Pretty Women -- 6:00 pm: Public dances The day ends with folk dances led by the village elders -- 7:00 pm: Evening ceremony and Alcohol Tasting The monks start the evening session of rituals and the village elders assemble to taste singchang in the temple.
Access (note)
  • Open.
Event (note)
  • Videotaped in performance at the Ura Lakhang, in Bumthang, Bhutan (under the eaves facing north-west), on Apr. 23, 2005.
Source (note)
  • Core of Culture.
Biography (note)
  • The Ura Yakchoe is said to be associated with a visit to Ura by the great 8th Century saint, Padmasambhava or Guru Rinpoche. The story is told how the people of Ura prayed to Padmasambhava to protect them from Leprosy. The Guru answered this call and by appearing in the village disguised as a mendicant and was invited to eat lunch by an old lady who was engaged in spinning wool. She made a lunch of buckwheat pancakes (traditional Bumthang food) but was surprised to find the beggar no longer there when she called him to eat. When she later returned to her spinning she discovered a precious statue of Vajrapani lying within her wool basket. Two different versions exist of the subsequent history of the statue. In the first version, three days later the statue miraculously flies from the old lady s house to the nearby village of Gadan. Another version has it that the statue was presented to the Gadan Lam by agreement amongst all the village people of Ura. It is also said that when the statue of Vajrapani arrived in Gadan, a nine-headed snake was disturbed and slithered out of the Ura Valley. The place is still known as Puguyungdhogo (Place of the nine-headed snake.) Leprosy, a disease thought to be spread by serpents (spirits) was eventually overcome in the Ura Valley by the blessings of Vajrapani.
  • The festival begins on the 12th Day of the Third Month (Lunar Calendar) with the procession of the Vajrapani relic from Gadan to the Ura Lhakhang. It ends five days later, on the 16th Day of the Third Month.
Call Number
*MGZIDF 843B
OCLC
853751190
Title
(Peling) Dri Ging. Ura Yakchoe: 3rd Day of Festival [Close shot] [electronic resource].
Imprint
2005.
Country of Producing Entity
Bhutan.
Series
Bhutan Dance Project, Core of Culture.
Summary
The Ging this time carry swords Palden Yoezer's final appearance. The Peling Ging-Sum (the three dances of the Ging in the Pema Lingpa tradition) are three dances that are performed around the country in a particular sequence. The Ging-Sum comprises three dances: Jug Ging, Dri Ging and Nga Ging which show the forces of good in direct combat with evil spirits who plague living beings with their constant suasions to commit wrong. Jug means baton or wand and the Jug Ging are spirits tasked to search out the prtesence of evil (using their wands as sensitive instruments to find out the direction in which evil lies). The Dri Ging - who carry swords - subjugate evil with their weapons before punishing and slaying (with compassion) any such evil spirits found. The Nga-ging - who each carry a drum - perform a victory dance at having overcome the evil spirits, and also ensure that even those conquered evil spirits are still prayed for and ultimately liberated from their evil ways. These three dances are considered to have been reveled by Terton Pema Lingpa in the 16th Century - and they are thus known as ter-cham or (revealed) treasure dances. They express a coherent choreographic and dramatic intention on the great Saint's part. They are most often performed together with nyulemai cham (Dance of the Evil Spirit) which serves as an active and visible reference to the existence of evil in the world - and the nyulema is often captured and dispatched by the Jug bearing Ging of the first of these dances.
Access
Open.
Event
Videotaped in performance at the Ura Lakhang, in Bumthang, Bhutan (under the eaves facing north-west), on Apr. 23, 2005.
Biography
The Ura Yakchoe is said to be associated with a visit to Ura by the great 8th Century saint, Padmasambhava or Guru Rinpoche. The story is told how the people of Ura prayed to Padmasambhava to protect them from Leprosy. The Guru answered this call and by appearing in the village disguised as a mendicant and was invited to eat lunch by an old lady who was engaged in spinning wool. She made a lunch of buckwheat pancakes (traditional Bumthang food) but was surprised to find the beggar no longer there when she called him to eat. When she later returned to her spinning she discovered a precious statue of Vajrapani lying within her wool basket. Two different versions exist of the subsequent history of the statue. In the first version, three days later the statue miraculously flies from the old lady s house to the nearby village of Gadan. Another version has it that the statue was presented to the Gadan Lam by agreement amongst all the village people of Ura. It is also said that when the statue of Vajrapani arrived in Gadan, a nine-headed snake was disturbed and slithered out of the Ura Valley. The place is still known as Puguyungdhogo (Place of the nine-headed snake.) Leprosy, a disease thought to be spread by serpents (spirits) was eventually overcome in the Ura Valley by the blessings of Vajrapani.
The festival begins on the 12th Day of the Third Month (Lunar Calendar) with the procession of the Vajrapani relic from Gadan to the Ura Lhakhang. It ends five days later, on the 16th Day of the Third Month.
Source
Gift; Core of Culture. NN-PD
Connect to:
Local Subject
Ritual and ceremonial dancing -- Bhutan.
Mask dances -- Bhutan.
Spirit dances -- Bhutan.
Added Author
Core of Culture (Organization)
Core of Culture. Donor
Added Title
Dance of the Ging with Swords (Peling Tradition). Ura Yakchoe: 3rd Day of Festival [Close shot]
Research Call Number
*MGZIDF 843B
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