Research Catalog

Vive la polka quadrille brillant, sur les motifs des polkas nationales

Title
Vive la polka [graphic] : quadrille brillant, sur les motifs des polkas nationales / composé pour la piano avec accompt. ad lib. par Camille Schubert ; [illustration signed on stone] Victor Coindre.
Author
Coindre, Victor, active 1838-1860.
Publication
Paris : Prilipp, [184-?]

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StatusFormatAccessCall NumberItem Location
Still imageSupervised use *MGZFX Coi V Viv 1Performing Arts Research Collections - Dance

Details

Additional Authors
Schubert, Camille, 1810-1889.
Description
1 print : lithograph, b&w; 25 x 34 cm. +
Subjects
Genre/Form
  • Sheet music covers.
  • Lithographs.
Note
  • Caption title.
  • Pl. no. : C. 623 P.
  • At upper right: à Madame Arnould de Nancy.
  • Lith. Huard.
  • Op. 74.
  • Score contains sections titled: La Carlota, La hongroise, Anna polka, Les plaisirs de Prague, Polka favorite de Baden-Baden.
Source (note)
  • Lillian Moore.
Biography (note)
  • Since the 1830s, the polka has enjoyed enormous popularity both as a dance and a musical form. Although opinions about its origins differ, it is believed to have roots in Poland or Bohemia. It was brought to Prague in 1837 and made its way to Vienna, St. Petersburg, Paris, and London. Capitalizing on its growing popularity as a ballroom dance, Jules Perrot and Carlotta Grisi introduced it to the ballet stage in 1844. In the mid 1800s, it rivalled the waltz as a dance craze. It has survived into the twenty-first century, and until 2009 was included as a category in the Grammy Awards.
Call Number
*MGZFX Coi V Viv 1
OCLC
825075540
Author
Coindre, Victor, active 1838-1860.
Title
Vive la polka [graphic] : quadrille brillant, sur les motifs des polkas nationales / composé pour la piano avec accompt. ad lib. par Camille Schubert ; [illustration signed on stone] Victor Coindre.
Imprint
Paris : Prilipp, [184-?]
Summary
Sheet music cover illustration in two sections: at left, a couple in nineteenth-century ballroom dancing attire; at right, a couple in Polish folk costume.
Biography
Since the 1830s, the polka has enjoyed enormous popularity both as a dance and a musical form. Although opinions about its origins differ, it is believed to have roots in Poland or Bohemia. It was brought to Prague in 1837 and made its way to Vienna, St. Petersburg, Paris, and London. Capitalizing on its growing popularity as a ballroom dance, Jules Perrot and Carlotta Grisi introduced it to the ballet stage in 1844. In the mid 1800s, it rivalled the waltz as a dance craze. It has survived into the twenty-first century, and until 2009 was included as a category in the Grammy Awards.
Local Note
Cataloging funds provided by Friends of Jerome Robbins Dance Division.
Source
Gift; Lillian Moore.
Connect to:
Added Author
Schubert, Camille, 1810-1889. Composer
Moore, Lillian. Donor
Publisher No.
C. 623 P. : Prilipp
Research Call Number
*MGZFX Coi V Viv 1
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