Research Catalog

Andrew Goodman Memorial collection

Title
Andrew Goodman Memorial collection, 1943-2010 (bulk 1946-2000).
Author
Goodman, Andrew, 1943-1964.

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5 Items

StatusContainerFormatAccessCall NumberItem Location
Box 1Mixed materialNo restrictions Sc MG 825 Box 1Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
Box 2Mixed materialNo restrictions Sc MG 825 Box 2Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
Box 3Mixed materialNo restrictions Sc MG 825 Box 3Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
Box 4Mixed materialNo restrictions Sc MG 825 Box 4Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
Box 5Mixed materialNo restrictions Sc MG 825 Box 5Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives

Details

Description
2.4 lin. ft. (3 printboxes, 1 1/2 archival box)
Summary
  • The Andrew Goodman Memorial Collection consists primarily of news clippings and other printed material related to the 1964 murder of three civil rights workers Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner, and subsequent events. There are also personal papers concerning Goodman, and letters of sympathy and remembrance written to the family.
  • The Personal Papers series, 1943-1964 consists of a small group of Andrew Goodman's personal papers. Of particular significance are items pertaining to Goodman's participation in Freedom Summer such as his application and a postcard postmarked June 21, 1964, written to his parents the day after arriving in Mississippi. Related papers include his cancelled check for a donation to SNCC, and printed material on the civil rights movement.
  • The series Disappearance and Murder, 1964-1966 consists of statements, letters, an interview, a copy of the indictment of the murderers and associated items directly related to the disappearance and death of the three men, Goodman in particular. Of special note is a transcript of an interview (June 27, 1964) with Robert McNamara, Secretary of Defense, about Buford Posey, a white Mississippian who suspected that the Ku Klux Klan had killed the three men, along with a statement (November 24, 1964) furnished to the FBI by Horace Doyle Barnett, one of the murderers, detailing exactly what had occurred. There are also sympathy letters from many political and civil rights leaders, and detailed articles about the disappearance and murder.
  • The Memorial Activities and Legacy series, 1965-2010 covers a wide array of events that commemorate the lives of the three men. Most of the collection consists of news clippings and other printed matter on the memorial activities that were sponsored by the Andrew Goodman Foundation, and one of its projects, known as the Chaney, Goodman, Schwerner Coalition of 1989. Additionally, the emergence of Carolyn Goodman as an activist for justice is documented in clippings and speeches that she delivered.
  • The series, Aftermath, 1989-2008 contains news clippings and other printed material about the Ku Klux Klan in Pennsylvania in 1989, serving as a counterpoint to the Coalition which sponsored the South-North Freedom Caravan that same year. Other events discussed in this series include the Edgar Ray Killen trial and the documentary film, "Neshoba", about the attempts at reconciliation in Neshoba County where the murder and Killen's trial took place.
Subjects
Note
  • Photographs transferred to Photographs and Prints Division.
  • Videotapes, DVDs and CDs transferred to Moving Image and Recorded Sound Division.
Information Relating to Copyright Status (note)
  • David Goodman
Biography (note)
  • Andrew Goodman, along with hundreds of other students, was a volunteer in the Mississippi Summer Project launched in June 1964 to register Black Mississippi residents to vote and to establish Freedom Schools. He along with another white activist, Michael Schwerner, and James Chaney, an African-American resident of Mississippi and Project volunteer, were shot to death on June 21, 1964. The disappearance and murder of the three men led to the intervention by President Lynden Baines Johnson and an FBI investigation. By 1967, nineteen members of the Ku Klux Klan were arrested by the FBI and charged with violating the civil rights of the three activists. Forty-one years later, on June 21, 2005, Edgar Ray Killen, a Klan member and part-time preacher, was found guilty of being the mastermind behind these murders.
  • In 1966, Carolyn and Robert Goodman founded the Andrew Goodman Foundation, in order to use their son's sacrifice for positive ends. From that time until her death in August 2007, Carolyn Goodman directed the Foundation to raise money for and support organizations whose work express the values for which Andrew Goodman stood, such as universal civil rights and social justice. Over the years the Foundation has coordinated a number of projects, in particular, the Chaney, Goodman, Schwerner Coalition of 1989, which commemorated the twenty-fifth anniversary of Freedom Summer and the death of the three civil rights workers by sponsoring the "Historic South-North Freedom Caravan" in June 1989. Hundreds of people travelled from Philadelphia, Mississippi, the location of the church that had been fire-bombed by the Klan and that the three young men had visited just prior to their murder, to meet with officials and townspeople. This event was used to support additional legislation for voter registration.
Call Number
Sc MG 825
OCLC
741155954
Author
Goodman, Andrew, 1943-1964.
Title
Andrew Goodman Memorial collection, 1943-2010 (bulk 1946-2000).
Biography
Andrew Goodman, along with hundreds of other students, was a volunteer in the Mississippi Summer Project launched in June 1964 to register Black Mississippi residents to vote and to establish Freedom Schools. He along with another white activist, Michael Schwerner, and James Chaney, an African-American resident of Mississippi and Project volunteer, were shot to death on June 21, 1964. The disappearance and murder of the three men led to the intervention by President Lynden Baines Johnson and an FBI investigation. By 1967, nineteen members of the Ku Klux Klan were arrested by the FBI and charged with violating the civil rights of the three activists. Forty-one years later, on June 21, 2005, Edgar Ray Killen, a Klan member and part-time preacher, was found guilty of being the mastermind behind these murders.
In 1966, Carolyn and Robert Goodman founded the Andrew Goodman Foundation, in order to use their son's sacrifice for positive ends. From that time until her death in August 2007, Carolyn Goodman directed the Foundation to raise money for and support organizations whose work express the values for which Andrew Goodman stood, such as universal civil rights and social justice. Over the years the Foundation has coordinated a number of projects, in particular, the Chaney, Goodman, Schwerner Coalition of 1989, which commemorated the twenty-fifth anniversary of Freedom Summer and the death of the three civil rights workers by sponsoring the "Historic South-North Freedom Caravan" in June 1989. Hundreds of people travelled from Philadelphia, Mississippi, the location of the church that had been fire-bombed by the Klan and that the three young men had visited just prior to their murder, to meet with officials and townspeople. This event was used to support additional legislation for voter registration.
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Finding Aid
Research Call Number
Sc MG 825
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