Research Catalog

McLaurin Family collection,

Title
McLaurin Family collection, 1948-1973.
Author
McLaurin family.
Supplementary Content
Finding aid

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Vol/DateFormatAccessStatusCall NumberLocation
folder 1Mixed materialUse in libraryAvailableSc MG 522 folder 1Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
folder 2Mixed materialUse in libraryAvailableSc MG 522 folder 2Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives

Details

Description
2 folders.
Subjects
Note
  • Photographs transferred to Photographs and Prints Division.
Source (note)
  • Elizabeth McLaurin
Biography (note)
  • The McLaurin family - George M. McLaurin, (n.d.-1968), Peninah S. McLaurin (1893-1966), and Dunbar Simms McLaurin (1920-1973) - are regarded as one of Oklahoma's history-making black families in the areas of civil rights, desegregation and economics.
  • George and Peninah McLaurin were a husband/wife team of civil rights pioneers. George McLaurin, a retired professor, was the first African American to break the color barrier and 56-year segregation policy at the University of Oklahoma. Following a lawsuit filed by McLaurin in 1948, a decision rendered by a federal three-judge panel resulted in his admission to the graduate college of the university. Peninah McLaurin, an educator for 33 years, first spearheaded the move to overcome segregation in Oklahoma's institutions of higher learning when she applied for admission to the university in 1923, but was refused.
  • Dunbar Simms McLaurin, businessman, professor, lecturer, attorney, and economist, was widely known as the principal founder of Freedom National Bank in Harlem-- the largest African-American-owned bank in the United States. In addition, he also specialized in economic development in minority communities and served as president of Ghettonomics, Inc., a Harlem-based firm of economic consultants. An ardent proponent of black capitalism, he perfected the Ghetto Economic Development I ndustrialization P lan, or "GEDI" Plan, which was designed to assist African-American businesses via small business loans.
Call Number
Sc MG 522
OCLC
650523225
Author
McLaurin family.
Title
McLaurin Family collection, 1948-1973.
Summary
The McLaurin Family collection comprises a dismantled scrapbook of newspaper clippings on segregation in Oklahoma schools and higher education, the McLaurin (George W.) desegregation case, the drive to end segregation in the educational system throughout the United States, the relationship between U.S. politics and civil rights, Southern reaction to Supreme Court desegregation rulings, and related information, 1948-1973. There are also obituary notices and funeral programs for the McLaurins (1966-1972); personal and career information (e.g., resumes and curriculum vitae) for Dunbar McLaurin; and letters, newspaper, and magazine clippings by and about Dunbar McLaurin.
Biography
The McLaurin family - George M. McLaurin, (n.d.-1968), Peninah S. McLaurin (1893-1966), and Dunbar Simms McLaurin (1920-1973) - are regarded as one of Oklahoma's history-making black families in the areas of civil rights, desegregation and economics.
George and Peninah McLaurin were a husband/wife team of civil rights pioneers. George McLaurin, a retired professor, was the first African American to break the color barrier and 56-year segregation policy at the University of Oklahoma. Following a lawsuit filed by McLaurin in 1948, a decision rendered by a federal three-judge panel resulted in his admission to the graduate college of the university. Peninah McLaurin, an educator for 33 years, first spearheaded the move to overcome segregation in Oklahoma's institutions of higher learning when she applied for admission to the university in 1923, but was refused.
Dunbar Simms McLaurin, businessman, professor, lecturer, attorney, and economist, was widely known as the principal founder of Freedom National Bank in Harlem-- the largest African-American-owned bank in the United States. In addition, he also specialized in economic development in minority communities and served as president of Ghettonomics, Inc., a Harlem-based firm of economic consultants. An ardent proponent of black capitalism, he perfected the Ghetto Economic Development I ndustrialization P lan, or "GEDI" Plan, which was designed to assist African-American businesses via small business loans.
Connect to:
Occupation
College teachers.
Research Call Number
Sc MG 522
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