Research Catalog

The Talking eggs

Title
The Talking eggs [videorecording] / Macmillan McGraw-Hill ; a Miller-Brody video dramatization.
Publication
New York : American School Publishers, 1991.

Items in the Library & Offsite


About 1 Item.
Still Loading More items...

FormatAccessStatusCall NumberLocation
Moving imageBy appointment onlyRequestJ VTH 2321 TOffsite

Details

Additional Authors
Description
1 videocassette (21 min.) : sd., col.; 1/2 in.
Series Statement
(The Caldecott Award series)
Subjects
Genre/Form
Films for preschoolers, Fiction.
Note
  • Based on the book by Robert D. San Souci.
Credits (note)
  • Director, Rosemary Killen; art direction, Jerry Pinkney, Chris Holm; music, Arthur Custer.
Title
The Talking eggs [videorecording] / Macmillan McGraw-Hill ; a Miller-Brody video dramatization.
Imprint
New York : American School Publishers, 1991.
Series
(The Caldecott Award series)
Credits
Director, Rosemary Killen; art direction, Jerry Pinkney, Chris Holm; music, Arthur Custer.
Performer
Carmen de Lavallade.
Summary
Dancer/actor Carmen de Lavallade narrates this iconographic adaptation of a Creole folktale which has its roots in the European fairy tale, "Toads and diamonds." In the old days, a widow with two daughters, Rose and Blanche, lived on a farm so poor it looked like the "tail end of bad luck." Rose was cross and mean like her ill-tempered mother. Blanche, on the other hand, was kind and smart. One day, Blanche met an old woman by the well and kindly gave her a drink of water. Returning home, Blanche endured the cruel treatment inflicted by her mother and sister until she could stand it no longer and ran away to the woods where she again met the elderly witch-woman. Inviting Blanche to her tumble-down shack, the woman warned the girl not to laugh at the unusual sights she would witness. Observing a cow with two heads and rainbow-colored chickens, Blanche was careful not to guffaw, not even when the crone removed her head to comb and plait her hair. The old woman rewarded Blanche's industriousness and good manners with a basket of eggs. Following the woman's instructions to select only the plain eggs that say "take me," rather than the bejewelled ones, Blanche was blessed with bounteous treasures when she cracked them open. When Blanche returned home laden with riches, her envious mother ordered Rose to visit the old woman. Unlike her sister, Rose mocked the woman's livestock and complained bitterly about the chores she was asked to perform. The greedy sister took the ornate eggs rather than the unadorned ones which produced snakes, yellow jackets and wolves that chased her and her mother into the woods. Sweet Blanche moved to the city and lived like a grand lady. This southern folktale is accompanied by paintings executed by the book's illustrator Jerry Pinkney and Arthur Custer's score, based on authentic early Cajun and Creole musical styles.
Added Author
San Souci, Robert D. Talking eggs.
Killen, Rosemary.
De Lavallade, Carmen, 1931-
Branch Call Number
J VTH 2321 T
View in Legacy Catalog