Research Catalog

Melchiorre Mauro-Cottone papers

Title
Melchiorre Mauro-Cottone papers, 1874-1982.
Author
Mauro-Cottone, Melchiorre, 1885-1938.
Supplementary Content
Finding Aid

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Box 1Mixed materialSupervised use JPB 06-47 Box 1Offsite
Box 2Mixed materialSupervised use JPB 06-47 Box 2Offsite
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Box 9Mixed materialSupervised use JPB 06-47 Box 9Offsite
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Box 11Mixed materialSupervised use JPB 06-47 Box 11Offsite
Box 12Mixed materialSupervised use JPB 06-47 Box 12Offsite

Details

Additional Authors
Description
6 linear feet (12 boxes)
Subjects
Genre/Form
  • Clippings.
  • Correspondence.
  • Diplomas.
  • Photographs.
  • Scores.
Biography (note)
  • Italian-American organist and composer Melchiorre Mauro-Cottone (1883-1938) came to the United States, where he enjoyed a distinguished career as a performer, most notably as the organist for the Philharmonic Society of New York for many years.
Language (note)
  • The Professional papers series contains correspondence in Italian and English (including some English translations of Italian documents). Other items in Italian may be found throughout this series as well.
Indexes/Finding Aids (note)
  • Collection available in repository and on internet.
Call Number
JPB 06-47
Author
Mauro-Cottone, Melchiorre, 1885-1938.
Title
Melchiorre Mauro-Cottone papers, 1874-1982.
Summary
The Melchiorre Mauro-Cottone papers consist of correspondence, clippings, programs, photographs, and scores that document the career of the concert organist and composer of choral and church music. Most of the scores are manuscript and include a large collection of hymns and other music for Roman Catholic Masses. Correspondence, some of which is in Italian, is mainly on professional matters and includes letters from several Italian and Italian-American musicians of enduring and transitory fame, including Marco Enrico Bossi, Enrico Caruso, Elsa and Ottorino Respighi, and Nina Morgana. Especially well-documented is Mauro-Cottone's involvement with Bossi's ill-fated 1925 American tour. Programs and clippings primarily relate to Mauro-Cottone's own performances, but the collection also includes programs autographed by the Respighis for two New York premieres, as well as some of Aurora Mauro-Cottone's early recital programs. The photographs mainly consist of autographed portraits, including those of fellow organists, Bossi, Marcel Dupré, Clarence Eddy, and Pietro Yon. Another item of note is the manuscript for Mauro-Cottone's unpublished instructional manual, Piano and theory in concise form (1934-1935).
Biography
Italian-American organist and composer Melchiorre Mauro-Cottone (1883-1938) came to the United States, where he enjoyed a distinguished career as a performer, most notably as the organist for the Philharmonic Society of New York for many years. Born in Palermo, Italy, he initially studied with his father, Antonio Mauro, who, like his own father, was an organist and composer. Melchiorre became organist at the Church of San Carlo Borromeo in Palermo at the age of twelve. He came to United States in 1905 and made his New York concert debut at Mendelssohn Hall in 1910. Although his connection with the Philharmonic was highly prestigious, as the orchestra's organist, Mauro-Cottone had only infrequent performances and was constantly seeking additional work to support his family, which included his wife, Rose Mauro-Cottone, and two daughters, Gina and Aurora (who later became a concert pianist). Throughout his career, Mauro-Cottone served as organist and choirmaster for various churches and religious institutions in New York, including the Spanish Church (Nuestra Señora de Esperanza), St. Ignatius Loyola Roman Catholic Church, and the Central Synagogue. He also enjoyed a ten-year association with the Capitol Theatre in New York, during the tenure of Samuel Rothafel. Additionally, Mauro-Cottone gave private piano lessons out of his home and spent several years developing a piano tutorial manual for which he unsuccessfully sought a publisher. In his later years, Mauro-Cottone was anxious to find a permanent position with a church or educational institution and moved his family to New London, Connecticut to become organist at St. Mary, Star of the Sea. Shortly before his sudden death in 1938, he was engaged as the organist for the Church of the Holy Trinity on West 83rd Street in New York. Mauro-Cottone was a prolific composer and arranger; perhaps the best known of his original compositions were two Masses, a collection of motets, and Christmas songs.
Language
The Professional papers series contains correspondence in Italian and English (including some English translations of Italian documents). Other items in Italian may be found throughout this series as well.
Indexes
Collection available in repository and on internet.
Connect to:
Occupation
Composers.
Organists.
Added Author
Bossi, Marco Enrico, 1861-1925.
Caruso, Enrico, 1873-1921.
Dupré, Marcel, 1886-1971.
Eddy, Clarence, 1851-1937.
Mauro-Cottone, Aurora.
Morgana, Nina, 1891-1986.
Respighi, Elsa, 1894-1996.
Respighi, Ottorino, 1879-1936.
Rothafel, Samuel Lionel, 1882-1936.
Yon, Pietro A., 1886-1943.
Mauro-Cottone, Melchiorre, 1885-1938. Piano and theory in concise form.
Capitol Theatre (New York, N.Y.)
Central Synagogue (New York, N.Y.)
Philharmonic Society of New York.
Research Call Number
JPB 06-47
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