Research Catalog

Ross Thalheimer papers,

Title
Ross Thalheimer papers, 1940-1978.
Author
Thalheimer, Ross, 1905-
Supplementary Content
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StatusVol/DateFormatAccessCall NumberItem Location
Box 1Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 267 Box 1Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives

Details

Additional Authors
Description
.4 lin. ft.
Subjects
Genre/Form
  • Awards.
  • Interviews.
Note
  • Photographs have been separated to Schomburg Photographs and Prints Division.
  • Schomburg NEH Automated Access to Special Collections Project.
Source (note)
  • Helen Thalheimer
  • William R. Coleman
Biography (note)
  • Ross Thalheimer, psychologist, university professor and author was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1905. Thalheimer received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. He was a faculty member at Johns Hopkins from 1927-1928, at the University of Washington (Seattle) from 1928-1929, and intermittently at the University of Baltimore and Johns Hopkins from 1929-1938. Before entering the Army in 1941, Thalheimer was National Legislative Representative of the American Federation of Teachers for two years. In 1946 he entered private practice as a psychotherapist and in 1953 founded the Community Guidance Service, a service agency staffed by psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers, providing low-cost personal guidance services at private offices throughout the New York City area. He was also the founder and executive director of the American Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis.
Call Number
Sc MG 267
Author
Thalheimer, Ross, 1905-
Title
Ross Thalheimer papers, 1940-1978.
Summary
The Ross Thalheimer Papers consist of papers relating to Thalheimer's activities as a civil rights supporter from the 1940's to the 1970's. Files relate primarily to the funding and presentation of the Thalheimer Award to the National Urban League, including the prize winning essays written by students, and for the Thalheimer Awards he funded for the NAACP including information about the recipients and associated programs, 1942-1976. Collection also contains letters from Kenneth B. Clark and Lester B. Granger, typescripts of interviews given by Thalheimer, copies of an advertisement placed in The New York Times in 1964 by the Psychologists' Committee on Interracial Relations concerning violence and race relations, and telegrams to Thalheimer from Martin Luther King, Jr. inviting him to join King on what would become known as the Selma to Montgomery March on March 9 and 21, 1965. There are also an address Thalheimer delivered in 1940 called "The Need for Equal Educational Opportunity in a Democracy;" an article he wrote entitled "What Can the Church Do About Juvenile Delinquency," 1954; biographical information about Thalheimer prepared by his widow; and expressions of sympathy upon his death.
Biography
Ross Thalheimer, psychologist, university professor and author was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1905. Thalheimer received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. He was a faculty member at Johns Hopkins from 1927-1928, at the University of Washington (Seattle) from 1928-1929, and intermittently at the University of Baltimore and Johns Hopkins from 1929-1938. Before entering the Army in 1941, Thalheimer was National Legislative Representative of the American Federation of Teachers for two years. In 1946 he entered private practice as a psychotherapist and in 1953 founded the Community Guidance Service, a service agency staffed by psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers, providing low-cost personal guidance services at private offices throughout the New York City area. He was also the founder and executive director of the American Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis.
Beginning in about 1937, Thalheimer endowed the annual Thalheimer Awards, presented by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, for outstanding branch fund raising program activities. He also made an annual grant to the National Urban League from 1945 until the 1960's. Initially this award was presented to the branches with the largest number of subscriptions to Opportunity Magazine, but from 1948-1953 awards were given to students who wrote the best essay for its vocational Opportunity Campaign. In 1954, this prize was replaced with cash awards provided to local branches for notable achievements in the field of vocational guidance. Thalheimer served as chairman of the Psychologists' Committee on Interracial Relations in the 1960's. He died in 1977.
Connect to:
Added Author
Granger, Lester B. (Lester Blackwell), 1896-1976.
King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968.
Clark, Kenneth Bancroft, 1914-2005.
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
Psychologists' Committee on Interracial Relations (New York, N.Y.)
Research Call Number
Sc MG 267
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