Jay Gorney scores

Title
Jay Gorney scores, 1916-1975 (bulk 1924-1961)
Author
Gorney, Jay, 1896-1990.
Supplementary Content
Finding Aid

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About 33 Items.
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Vol/DateFormatAccessStatusCall NumberLocation
Box 1Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 1Offsite
Box 2Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 2Offsite
Box 3Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 3Offsite
Box 4Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 4Offsite
Box 5Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 5Offsite
Box 6Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 6Offsite
Box 7Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 7Offsite
Box 8Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 8Offsite
Box 9Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 9Offsite
Box 10Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 10Offsite
Box 11Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 11Offsite
Box 12Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 12Offsite
Box 13Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 13Offsite
Box 14Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 14Offsite
Box 15Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 15Offsite
Box 16Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 16Offsite
Box 17Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 17Offsite
Box 18Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 18Offsite
Box 19Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 19Offsite
Box 20Mixed materialSupervised useAvailableJPB 04-33 Box 20Offsite

Details

Additional Authors
Description
17 linear ft. (33 boxes)
Genre/Form
Scores.
Biography (note)
  • Versatile composer, Jay Gorney (1896-1990), wrote for the stage, screen, and television from the mid-1920s through the late 1960s.
Indexes/Finding Aids (note)
  • Finding aid available in repository and on internet.
Call Number
JPB 04-33
Author
Gorney, Jay, 1896-1990.
Title
Jay Gorney scores, 1916-1975 (bulk 1924-1961)
Summary
The Jay Gorney scores consist of published scores from his earliest student works, original and published scores of his theatrical, motion picture, and television works, and scores and score fragments from student workshop productions. The collection does not include the score for Gorney's most famous work, Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?
Biography
Versatile composer, Jay Gorney (1896-1990), wrote for the stage, screen, and television from the mid-1920s through the late 1960s. In a long and flourishing career, Gorney got his start by writing songs for Broadway shows and revues including, Earl Carroll's Sketch Book (1929), the Ziegfeld Follies (1931), and Merry-Go-Round (1927). In 1932, Gorney, working with lyricist E. Y. (Yip) Harburg, penned the music to the song that became a Depression-era anthem, Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?, as part of the revue, Americana. During the early 1930s, he also became involved with the motion picture industry when he was was hired by Paramount Pictures' New York office. In 1933, Gorney went to Hollywood, where he worked for the Fox and Columbia studios, adding Hollywood screenplays to his working repertoire and "discovering" Shirley Temple, who introduced one of Gorney's tunes, Baby, Take a Bow, with James Dunn, in the film, Stand Up and Cheer (1934). In addition to Harburg, Gorney collaborated with Henry Myers, Edward Eliscu, Sidney Clare, Howard Dietz, and Jean and Walter Kerr as lyricists in film and stage productions.
As a Jew who had experienced anti-Semitisim firsthand, Gorney was very aware and supportive of human rights and social justice issues and joined in with the artistic and intellectual community's group efforts to improve conditions in these areas. He was very active in several associations, including the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP). It was this aspect of his life that produced songs like, the Bill of Rights, These Are The Times, and Are You Backing up your Commander-in-Chief? Gorney's involvement with these causes also led to his being called in front of the House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC) in 1955 and being blacklisted, effectively ending his motion picture career. Gorney returned to New York in 1947 to work on a theater production and he also began to teach, becoming the chairman of the Department of Musical Playwriting at the Dramatic Workshop of the New School (1948-51). He ran his own Jay Gorney School of Musical Comedy and later taught for the American Theatre Wing's Professional Training Program, teaching sketch writing and leading a student production company that developed and performed student work. In the early 1960s, Gorney tried his hand at television writing, directing, and producing. Gorney died in New York on June 14, 1990.
Indexes
Finding aid available in repository and on internet.
Connect to:
Occupation
Composers.
Added Author
Harburg, E. Y. (Edgar Yipsel), 1896-1981.
Murphy, Owen, 1893-1965.
Myers, Henry, 1893-
American Music Collection.
Research Call Number
JPB 04-33
View in Legacy Catalog