Research Catalog

Eleanor Spencer papers

Title
Eleanor Spencer papers, 1900-1973, 1900-1954 (bulk)
Author
Spencer, Eleanor, 1890-1973.
Supplementary Content
Finding Aid

Items in the Library & Off-site


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StatusVol/DateFormatAccessCall NumberItem Location
Box 1Mixed materialSupervised use JPB 04-20 Box 1Offsite
Box 2Mixed materialSupervised use JPB 04-20 Box 2Offsite

Details

Description
1.5 linear ft. (2 boxes)
Subjects
Genre/Form
  • Photographs.
  • Handbills.
  • Clippings.
  • Programs.
  • Appointment books.
Biography (note)
  • Eleanor Spencer (1890-1973) was an American pianist, who, after going deaf in the late 1930s, later retrained herself and continued her career as a performer.
Language (note)
  • The Promotional series contains some programs in German.
Indexes/Finding Aids (note)
  • Finding aid available in repository and on internet.
Call Number
JPB 04-20
Author
Spencer, Eleanor, 1890-1973.
Title
Eleanor Spencer papers, 1900-1973, 1900-1954 (bulk)
Summary
The Eleanor Spencer papers document her career as a pianist primarily from her early childhood training to the time just before Spencer began going deaf (the late 1930s). Programs, handbills, clippings and other promotional material date mainly from this period. The diaries and letters mostly date from ca. 1940 forward. Spencer's diaries, in the form of datebooks, are a unique day-by-day record covering 16 years during which the pianist was losing her hearing, relearning the piano, and resuming performances. Music manuscripts contain some of Spencer's piano exercises. The collection contains essentially no documentation of Spencer's life or career after 1954.
Biography
Eleanor Spencer (1890-1973) was an American pianist, who, after going deaf in the late 1930s, later retrained herself and continued her career as a performer. She began studying piano as a small child and performing at age 10. Spencer studied with William Mason and at 14 moved to Europe where she continued her studies with Harold Bauer and Theodor Leschetizky. Her recital debut was in Bechstein Hall in London on 28 Apr. 1910, after which she performed further in Britain and Europe, including many appearances with major orchestras. Her American debut was in Carnegie Hall on 3 Nov. 1913. Spencer garnered consistently good notices for both her solo and orchestral performances; critics noted her strong technique, rich sound, and tasteful musical sense. She settled in Paris and based her career in Europe until the start of World War II, when she moved to New York. By that time she had started to go deaf and begun a decade-long hiatus from performance, during which she retrained herself. In the mid-1940s, though deaf, she resumed periodic solo performances, receiving strong reviews. Spencer spent her last years in Switzerland.
Language
The Promotional series contains some programs in German.
Indexes
Finding aid available in repository and on internet. http://digilib.nypl.org/dynaweb/ead/music/musspenc
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Research Call Number
JPB 04-20
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