Research Catalog

Elizabeth Van Lew papers

Title
Elizabeth Van Lew papers, 1862-1901.
Author
Van Lew, Elizabeth L., 1818-1900.
Supplementary Content
Finding Aid

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FormatAccessStatusCall NumberLocation
Moving imagePermit neededIn transit*ZL-323Schwarzman Building - Manuscripts & Archives Room 328

Details

Description
  • .3 linear foot (1 box).
  • 1 microfilm reel.
Subjects
Genre/Form
Photographic prints.
Access (note)
  • Restricted access;
  • Microfilm must be used in lieu of originals.
  • Access to artifacts requires advance permission of the Curator of Manuscripts.
Additional Formats (note)
  • available on microfilm;
Biography (note)
  • Elizabeth L. Van Lew (1818-1900) was an American abolitionist and federal agent during the U.S. Civil War.
Processing Action (note)
  • Cataloged
Call Number
MssCol 3135
Author
Van Lew, Elizabeth L., 1818-1900.
Title
Elizabeth Van Lew papers, 1862-1901.
Restricted Access
Restricted access; Manuscripts and Archives Division; Permit must be requested at the division indicated.
Access
Microfilm must be used in lieu of originals.
Access to artifacts requires advance permission of the Curator of Manuscripts.
Summary
Collection consists of correspondence, Van Lew's personal narrative, notes, photographs, artifacts, and clippings. Correspondence, 1862-1901, contains letters to and from Van Lew as well as letters relating to her activities. Bulk of the collection is her personal narrative of the war in Richmond. Also, notes on her ancestry and spying; photographs; artifacts, such as rings and studs carved by federal prisoners and given to her in gratitude for her services in their behalf; the cipher she used to send messages to Union commanders; and newsclippings concerning her death.
Additional Formats
Entire collection available on microfilm; New York Public Library; *ZL-323
Biography
Elizabeth L. Van Lew (1818-1900) was an American abolitionist and federal agent during the U.S. Civil War. She aided the Union cause by providing intelligence reports from Richmond, Virginia, where she lived. She helped Union prisoners escape from their captors and also was involved in the "underground railroad". After the war, President Grant appointed her Postmaster of Richmond; then in 1877 she went to Washington, D.C. to work in the U.S. Post Office Department. She returned to Richmond during the Cleveland administration and spent her remaining years working for women's rights.
Finding Aids
Collection guide available in repository and on internet.
Connect to:
Occupation
Abolitionists.
Spies.
Research Call Number
MssCol 3135
*ZL-323
View in Legacy Catalog