Research Catalog

George Freeman Bragg manuscripts,

Title
George Freeman Bragg manuscripts, undated.
Author
Bragg, George F. (George Freeman), 1863-1940.
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StatusVol/DateFormatAccessCall NumberItem Location
1Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 244 1Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives

Details

Description
1 folder (8 items)
Donor/Sponsor
  • Preservation of the Black Religious Heritage Project funded by the Lilly Endowment.
  • Schomburg NEH Automated Access to Special Collections Project.
Subjects
Source (note)
  • Lambeth Books
Biography (note)
  • George Freeman Bragg served as rector of St. James Episcopal Church in Baltimore, Maryland from 1891 until his death in 1940 and also edited and published several newspapers.
Processing Action (note)
  • Accessioned
  • Surveyed
  • Processed
  • Cataloged
Call Number
Sc MG 244
Author
Bragg, George F. (George Freeman), 1863-1940.
Title
George Freeman Bragg manuscripts, undated.
Summary
The George Freeman Bragg Manuscripts consist primarily of biographical essays about three prominent nineteenth century African Americans in addition to two lists, the first providing names of famous African American women and the second, a list of people to be confirmed, presumably at St. James Episcopal Church. The biographical essays discuss such key figures as Daniel A. Payne, Blanche Kelso Bruce and John Mercer Langston. Other typescripts pertain to the history of African Americans in the Episcopal Church and the union of the African Methodist Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Church.
Biography
George Freeman Bragg served as rector of St. James Episcopal Church in Baltimore, Maryland from 1891 until his death in 1940 and also edited and published several newspapers. Born in Warrenton, North Carolina, he was brought up in Virginia. In 1887 Bragg graduated from the Theological School for Negroes, a branch of the Virginia Theological Seminary. Wilberforce University awarded him an honorary Doctor of Divinity Degree in 1902.
Bragg was ordained a deacon of the Episcopal Church in 1887. One year later he became a priest and was assigned to St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Norfolk, Virginia, where he enlarged the size of the congregation during his three years there. He did the same for St. James Episcopal Church in Baltimore.
Bragg was an active leader in African American social and educational movements. In 1884 he was an honorary commissioner of the New Orleans Exposition. His major achievement in Baltimore was the founding in 1899 of the progressively administered Maryland Home for Friendless Colored Children.
During his journalistic career, Bragg founded "The Lancet" in 1882, one of the first African American weekly newspapers, and in 1886 he edited "The Afro-American Churchman" which later became "The Church Advocate." He also wrote many pamphlets and books including "History of the Afro-American Group of the Episcopal Church" (1922) and "Men of Maryland." (1914).
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Added Title
Schomburg NEH Automated Access to Special Collections Project.
Preservation of the Black Religious Heritage Project funded by the Lilly Endowment.
Research Call Number
Sc MG 244
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