Research Catalog

Hosea Hudson Papers, (bulk 1952-1958)

Title
Hosea Hudson Papers, 1941-1980 (bulk 1952-1958)
Author
Hudson, Hosea.
Supplementary Content
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StatusVol/DateFormatAccessCall NumberItem Location
Box 3Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 168 Box 3Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
Box 2Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 168 Box 2Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
Box 1Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 168 Box 1Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives

Details

Description
1.2 lin. ft.
Donor/Sponsor
Schomburg NEH Automated Access to Special Collections Project.
Subjects
Source (note)
  • Hudson, Hosea
Biography (note)
  • Hosea Hudson was active as a leading militant African American trade unionist and member of the Communist Party from 1931 to 1948, during which time he held prominent positions in both the Party and the United Steel Workers of America.
Processing Action (note)
  • Inventoried at Rutgers University Libraries, Dept. of Special Collections
  • Transferred to Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
  • Accessioned
  • Cataloged
Call Number
Sc MG 168
Author
Hudson, Hosea.
Title
Hosea Hudson Papers, 1941-1980 (bulk 1952-1958)
Summary
The Hosea Hudson Papers document this labor leader and communist organizer's political activities in Alabama and the Communist Party's attitude toward labor and the rights of African Americans. The bulk of the collection, dating from 1952 to 1958, consists mainly of Communist Party material: reports, memoranda, resolutions and printed matter. Subjects reflected in these papers are labor-unions, farm labor, unemployment, industrial workers, segregation, and the right of African Americans to vote. Hudson's writings are represented by drafts of two books: "Black Worker in the Deep South: A Personal Record" Written by Hudson (1972) and "The Narrative of Hosea Hudson: His Life as a Negro Communist in the South" written by Nell Irvin Painter (1979), and of several unpublished works, in addition to book reviews, notes and some correspondence. Hudson's intensive trade-union involvement at the Wallwork Foundry of the Tennessee Coal and Railroad Company and the Jackson Foundry in the 1930's and 1940's are sparsely documented.
Biography
Hosea Hudson was active as a leading militant African American trade unionist and member of the Communist Party from 1931 to 1948, during which time he held prominent positions in both the Party and the United Steel Workers of America. Born the son of sharecroppers in Georgia in 1898, Hudson received little formal education. In his youth and during the early 1920's, he worked as a sharecropper first with his grandmother and later with his first wife. He become an iron molder in 1923 and for the next two decades worked in various steel foundries in Georgia and Alabama.
Hudson joined the Communist Party in 1931 and was soon elected a unit leader. During the Depression, he was instrumental in organizing various mass meetings of unemployed African American workers in Birmingham, several of which culminated in marches on the Birmingham City Hall. He enrolled in the Communist Party's National Training School, New York in 1934 where he developed his reading and writing skills and studied political economy and the history of the trade union movement. His role as a successful local communist organizer and his activism on behalf of African American representation in successive meetings and conventions of the Council of Industrial Organizations in Alabama led to his dismissal from various industrial plants in the South. Hudson was also an outspoken advocate of voting rights and anti-lyncing legislation in the South. In 1951 he migrated to the North and settled in Atlantic City, New Jersey with his wife.
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Added Title
Schomburg NEH Automated Access to Special Collections Project.
Research Call Number
Sc MG 168
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