Research Catalog

Shelton Hale Bishop collection

Title
Shelton Hale Bishop collection, 1945-1957.
Author
Bishop, Shelton Hale, 1889-1962.

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2 Items

StatusContainerFormatAccessCall NumberItem Location
Folder 2Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 408 Folder 2Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
Folder 1Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 408 Folder 1Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives

Details

Description
2 folders
Summary
The Shelton Hale Bishop Collection consists of photocopies of sermons, letters and an address briefly touching on his career as rector of St. Philip's Church.
Donor/Sponsor
Schomburg NEH Automated Access to Special Collections Project.
Subjects
Genre/Form
Sermons.
Reproduction (note)
  • Photocopies.
Source (note)
  • Davis, Elizabeth Bishop
Biography (note)
  • Shelton Hale Bishop's long church career culminated during the years he served as rector of St. Philip's Church in Harlem from 1933-1957.
Processing Action (note)
  • Accessioned
  • Cataloged
Call Number
Sc MG 408
OCLC
NYPW092000004-A
Author
Bishop, Shelton Hale, 1889-1962.
Title
Shelton Hale Bishop collection, 1945-1957.
Reproduction
Photocopies.
Biography
Shelton Hale Bishop's long church career culminated during the years he served as rector of St. Philip's Church in Harlem from 1933-1957. Born in 1889 in New York City, his parents were Estelle and Hutchens Chew Bishop, who was rector of St. Philip's Church from 1886 to 1933. When Shelton Bishop was seven years old he entered the service of St. Philip's as an acolyte. After receiving his Bachelor of Arts degree from Columbia University in 1911 and graduating from General Theological Seminary, Bishop was ordained in 1914. He was rector of Church of the Holy Cross, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from 1916 to 1923. For ten years beginning in 1933 he was director of young people's work. He retired as rector of St. Philip's Church in 1957 and relocated to Hawaii where he became involved in local church activities.
Bishop's accomplishments with St. Philip's included introducing increased church activity directed against crime, alcoholism and drug addiction. He strongly supported the Katie Ferguson Home, an institution in Harlem for unwed mothers, and was involved in other social welfare activities. In the 1940's the Lafarge Clinic, Harlem's first psychiatric clinic operated free of charge from St. Philip's. Early on he supported admission of women to membership on the vestry. The membership of the church reached 3,800 by the mid 1950's.
Bishop's achievements outside the church include his membership on the Board of Directors of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. He was a leader in first drawing attention to the de facto segregation of New York City public schools, as well as being a leading figure during the 1940's in articulating demands that the United States Armed Forces be desegregated. Bishop was a founding member of the Wiltwyck School, the first residential institution to serve emotionally disturbed African American children who came to the attention of the courts.
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Finding Aid
Research Call Number
Sc MG 408
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