Research Catalog

Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters collection

Title
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters collection, 1939-1987.

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6 Items

StatusContainerFormatAccessCall NumberItem Location
Box 1Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 250 Box 1Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
Box 2Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 250 Box 2Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
Box 3Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 250 Box 3Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
Box 4Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 250 Box 4Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
Box 5Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 250 Box 5Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives
Box 6Mixed materialUse in library Sc MG 250 Box 6Schomburg Center - Manuscripts & Archives

Details

Additional Authors
  • Dellums, C. L. (Cottrell Laurence)
  • Patterson, Thomas.
  • Delson, Levin and Gordon.
Description
2.3 lin. ft.
Summary
The Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters Collection includes printed matter, correspondence, legal documents, addresses by A. Philip Randolph and other material reflecting the activities of this union. The correspondence files include outgoing letters relating to labor and union rights. There is substantial legal correspondence with the Delson, Levin and Gordon law firm (1950's-1960's), which represented the BSCP. There are also letters to and from Randolph, the international president; Benjamin F. McLaurin, international field organizer (1950's) and Eastern Zone supervisor (1960's); Thomas Patterson, who was BSCP Eastern Zone supervisor from 1951-1956; and BSCP International President C. L. Dellums (1968-1970). The correspondence often concerns the cases of individual workers, and pension and contract rights. Included are addresses and resolutions submitted by Randolph at various conventions of the BSCP. The papers also contain two union contracts between the BSCP and the Pullman Company (1953), and the BSCP and the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Company (1969); clippings (1960-1977); programs from events honoring the BSCP; and financial records including ledgers and financial journals.
Donor/Sponsor
Schomburg NEH Automated Access to Special Collections Project.
Subjects
Source (note)
  • Wilson, Joseph F.
  • Joseph Wilson
  • Marie H. Mosley
Biography (note)
  • The Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) organized railway porters (traditionally an occupation for African-Americans) to bargain with the Pullman Company which held a virtual monopoly on the nation's sleeping car facilities. The BSCP was founded in 1925 in New York City to counteract the poor wages, long hours, and other injustices practiced by the Pullman Car Company. A. Philip Randolph became president of the Brotherhood in 1928. In the mid-1930's the American Federation of Labor (AFL) and the New Deal's National Mediation Board recognized the BSCP.
Processing Action (note)
  • Accessioned
  • Cataloged for HDI
  • Cataloged
  • Accessioning updated
  • Cataloging updated
Call Number
Sc MG 250
OCLC
NYPW086000032-A
Title
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters collection, 1939-1987.
Biography
The Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) organized railway porters (traditionally an occupation for African-Americans) to bargain with the Pullman Company which held a virtual monopoly on the nation's sleeping car facilities. The BSCP was founded in 1925 in New York City to counteract the poor wages, long hours, and other injustices practiced by the Pullman Car Company. A. Philip Randolph became president of the Brotherhood in 1928. In the mid-1930's the American Federation of Labor (AFL) and the New Deal's National Mediation Board recognized the BSCP.
In 1942 Randolph organized the March on Washington Movement in an attempt to force the federal government to end discrimination in war-related employment and to end segregation in the military. The march was aborted when President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 8802 which outlawed discrimination in unions and in companies doing business with the federal government and established the Fair Employment Practices Committee to oversee compliance. Although the Executive Order did not mention the military, Randolph, nonetheless, had forced the national government to admit to the existence of widespread racial discrimination in employment opportunities and to accept responsibility to provide remedies for that situation.
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Finding Aid
Added Author
Dellums, C. L. (Cottrell Laurence)
Patterson, Thomas.
Delson, Levin and Gordon.
Research Call Number
Sc MG 250
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