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Blog Posts by Subject: Government and Law

#NPS100: Celebrating the National Park Service Centennial

The library is full of resources for you to plan your visit to or learn about the history of the National Parks.Read More ›

Department of Education Winter/Spring Internships

The Department of Education (ED) offers internships for students interested in seeking valuable work experience in government and federal education policy and administration. Read More ›

Elecciones 2016: Regístrese, Investigue y Vote

Las Convenciones Nacionales Demócrata y Republicana han finalizado, y las nominaciones presidenciales de los dos principales partidos políticos de los Estados Unidos son oficiales: Hillary Clinton por el Partido Demócrata y Donald Trump por el Partido Republicano. Con las elecciones generales a sólo cien días, aquí le presentamos recursos para ayudarle a prepararse para votar.Read More ›

Election 2016: Register, Research, and Vote

Resources to help you get ready to vote.Read More ›

Where to Find U.S. Environmental Data

Here are some links to online environmental resources.Read More ›

A Reading List for America

A reading list in response to recent events and to help foster literacy of the American Black experience. Read More ›

Celebrating the Stamp Act's Repeal, May 19, 1766

One Philadelphian's account of the celebrations accompanying the repeal of the Stamp Act in 1766, and what it tells us about the coming of the American Revolution.Read More ›

When the Look Matters: Design Patents and Other IP Protection for Business

Design makes your product more attractive, helps customers know it's your product, and is an opportunity to express yourself. So how do you protect your design?Read More ›

Interpreters Needed for the April 19 Presidential Primary Election

Chinese and Korean interpreters and other positions are available if you are interested in working the polls.Read More ›

Politicizing the Federal Courts in Early America

We often bemoan the recent politicization of the federal courts and especially appointments to the Supreme Court, but this has been a source of political strife since the creation of the federal judiciary. The judicial politics of the Jeffersonian era help explain why the Supreme Court remains such a charged issue in our own time.Read More ›

The Best Tools for Informed Election Voting

This year you may be prepared to vote but not yet prepared to vote for any candidate in particular. If you find yourself unsure of where to direct your support, there are plenty of resources to help you find your footing.Read More ›

Founding Firefighters: Volunteer Firefighters and Early American Constitutional History

The Chelsea Fire Club formed in late 1788 to protect the people and buildings of Norwich, Connecticut from being destroyed by fire. The records of the Fire Club reveal far more about how early Americans grappled with the challenge of self-government than about firefighting. Read More ›

Podcast #70: Alan Rusbridger on Whistleblowers and Wikileaks

As then-editor-in-chief of The Guardian, Alan Rusbridger published NSA documents leaked by Edward Snowden and made reporting on Wikileaks a cornerstone of the newspaper's coverage. On this week's episode of the podcast, we're proud to present Alan Rusbridger discussing whistleblowers and Wikileaks.Read More ›

Mother's Day for Working Moms

Mother's Day turned 101 this year. While we associate this holiday with cards, gifts, and more, Director of Women's Bureau at the Department of Labor, Latifa Lyles points out that there are other ways we can value mothers. Read More ›

Podcast #59: Sonia Sotomayor on Education and Color Blindness

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor has lived and continues to live with passion, vigor, and curiosity. In her memoir My Beloved World, Sotomayor recounts her childhood living in The Bronxdale Houses, public housing since renamed the Justice Sonia Sotomayor Houses; the death of her father; and her rise through the ranks of the judiciary. Read More ›

Lawmen and Badmen: The Tin Star of the Old West

In the early American West, the lawman might be a U.S. marshal, appointed by the Attorney General, or he might be a local sheriff elected to office by the townfolk. The distinction often makes no difference in old Western movies, but is an optimum detail in the pursuit of genealogy and local history research in the Milstein Division, where reference librarians must wrangle between the local, county, state, and federal levels in order to rope in relevant resources for patron requests.Read More ›

Filing Taxes at SIBL

Once again The Science, Industry and Business Library offers two Tax Assistance programs. Fliers are available throughout SIBL and are reproduced here with a brief description of both programs. Please also consult Income Tax Information 2015 for tax filing help offered across the library.Read More ›

New Yearbook of the United Nations Launched

The Yearbook of the United Nations—published by the Department of Public Information and available at the NYPL—stands as the authoritative reference work on the activities and concerns of the organization. Read More ›

Six Books on Criminal Justice to Read After Season One of "Serial"

Beyond just the need of proving the innocence of a potential wrongfully convicted person, the show has brought to light issues of crime, sentencing, prison and the potential injustices we face. Read More ›

Keeping Up on the Minimum Wage

This is the Department of Labor blog post, authored by Tom Perez, Secretary of the Labor Department. In his post, he states that a minimum wage job barely covers one person's basic needs. Read More ›
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