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Blog Posts by Subject: Theatre

Podcast #120: John Lithgow and James Shapiro on Guy Fawkes and Falling for Shakespeare

For this week's episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we're proud to present John Lithgow and James Shapiro discussing Guy Fawkes, the Gunpowder Plot, and Getting Hooked on Shakespeare.Read More ›

Keeping #TonysSoDiverse Beyond the 2015-2016 Season

It is too soon to tell if the next Broadway season will boast the same number of projects that star Asian-Americans, Latinos, African-Americans, deaf and disabled artists that it did this year, but it looks promising. Here’s a look at upcoming projects that are scheduled to open soon.Read More ›

The Many Characters of Lupino Lane

Photos of Lupino Lane in Only Me, now on display on the third floor of the Library for the Performing Arts.Read More ›

Playwright Pays Homage To Legendary MCs With Play Cycle

Shaun Neblett, aka MC SNEB, is a playwright, educator, and founder of Changing Perceptions Theater. Read More ›

Hamlet Turns Left: Handwritten Shakespeare Promptbooks at LPA

The Library for the Performing Arts has several hundred of these promptbooks, and staff are working to make them more accessible to researchers.Read More ›

British Soldiers' Theatre During the Revolutionary War

When Shakespeare wrote “All the World’s a Stage,” he probably wasn’t thinking that his words would someday be performed in an occupied city by an invading army. Nevertheless, during the American Revolution theater seemed to spring up in the oddest of places, often in productions acted by soldiers. Read More ›

Bros, Shakespeare, and Nudity... Not All at the Same Time: The Librarian Is In Podcast, Ep. 10

Doug Reside from NYPL’s Library for the Performing Arts joins Gwen and Frank to talk about the Bard and the Great White Way. He even raps a teeny tiny bit from Hamilton.Read More ›

Instant Shakespeare

In keeping with its motto of “Shakespeare for Everyone,” the Instant Shakespeare Company will be organizing readings at library branches this spring.Read More ›

The Mystery Shakespeare Plot

A clue to a mysterious performance that at the time may have been "the finest spectacle that has ever been presented on the American stage."Read More ›

Falstaff On the Road: Or, Why Dickens Was Right About America

Two prime examples of actors and actor/managers who based their later careers on performing Sir John Falstaff.Read More ›

30 Days of Shakespeare

We asked thirty staff members to select and read their favorite Shakespeare speech, monologue, or sonnet. We will release one each day throughout the month of April.Read More ›

Upcoming NYC Rashomon Performance! Spotlight on the Kurosawa Classic

Rashomon on screen and on the stage.Read More ›

March Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

Join us for an Author @ the Library talk this March at Mid-Manhattan Library to hear distinguished non-fiction authors discuss their work and answer your questions.Read More ›

O Romeo, Romeo

Why is Margaret Mather's 1882 performance as Juliet, in William Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet,' so well remembered? Perhaps this illustration of the balcony scene, apparently in her own hand, has something to do with it. Read More ›

African Americans on Broadway Then and Now

The 2015-2016 Broadway theater season is being hailed as one of the most diverse on record. Is this slate of shows featuring African Americans on Broadway unprecedented? Let’s look take a look back into American theater history to approximately 70 years ago.Read More ›

100 Years (Or So) Ago in Dance: Florence Mills

Florence Mills was famed for her birdlike voice as well as her spontaneous dancing during her numbers. She was one of the most popular entertainers of the early 1920s in New York, London, and Paris, and yet, perhaps because she died at age 32, her fame has not survived. Read More ›

Live from the Reading Room: Nathan Woodard to Alice Childress

A love letter from musician and composer Nathan Woodard to his wife and creative collaborator Alice Childress.Read More ›

A Trivial Blog Post for Serious People

An unassuming black notebook contains the earliest draft of Oscar Wilde’s play The Importance of Being Earnest, written by hand and with the author’s frequent emendations.Read More ›

Live from the Reading Room: Arturo Schomburg to Langston Hughes

Today’s letter features correspondence between Arturo Alfonso Schomburg and Langston Hughes. In the excerpt below, Schomburg speaks with Hughes regarding acquisitions for The Division of Negro Literature, History and Prints—the forerunner to today’s Schomburg Center.Read More ›

Public Domain Theater: The Black Crook

This month, thanks to the Library’s release of all of our high resolution photographs of objects with no known U.S. copyright restrictions, the promptbook, the sheet music, and the photos may be used without restriction for any purpose, including commercially.Read More ›
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