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Blog Posts by Subject: Caribbean literature

Live from the Reading Room: Cheryl Boyce-Taylor to Friends and Poets

This episode of 'Live From the Reading Room: Correspondence', recited by Trinidadian costume historian Natalya Mills-Mayrena, features a letter from Trinidadian Poet Cheryl Boyce-Taylor to a group of friends and poets. In the letter, Boyce-Taylor discusses writing, family, and publishing. Read More ›

Live from the Reading Room: Claudia Jones to Eslanda Robeson

This podcast episode recited by Carole Boyce Davies features a lively letter between friends and colleagues: Claudia Jones and Eslanda Robeson. Read More ›

Podcast #129: Edwidge Danticat on Silence, Bridging Audiences, and Participating in Stories

Edwidge Danticat is a MacArthur Fellow "Genius Grant" recipient and author, best known for her book Brother, I'm Dying. In 2010, she visited the Library to talk about her essay collection Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work. Read More ›

Small Islands, Big Carnival: West Indians in the USA

West Indian immigrants form the largest Black immigrant group in the city and most likely nationwide, though they represent individually small nations. This weekend the collective will come together to throw the biggest party in our city.Read More ›

Podcast #121: Derek Walcott on Hemingway, Travel, and First Love

In 2010 Derek Walcott delivered the Robert B. Silvers lecture, focusing on the relationship between Ernest Hemingway and the Caribbean.Read More ›

Desfile Puertorriqueño | Puerto Rican Day Parade

Every year on the eve of the second Sunday of the month of June New York City holds the National Puerto Rican day parade. This is a celebration that takes over the entire city, fills it with beautiful events, festivals that display the beauty of the Puerto Rican culture.Read More ›

Live from the Reading Room: C.L.R. James to Constance Webb

Today’s episode features a love letter from Trinidadian social theorist, historian and political activist C.L.R. James (1901-1989) to his wife and confidant the actress, model, writer and activist Constance Webb (1918-2005). Read More ›

Live from the Reading Room: Arturo Schomburg to Langston Hughes

Today’s letter features correspondence between Arturo Alfonso Schomburg and Langston Hughes. In the excerpt below, Schomburg speaks with Hughes regarding acquisitions for The Division of Negro Literature, History and Prints—the forerunner to today’s Schomburg Center.Read More ›

¡Celebrando la Dominicanidad con Nuevas Impresiones Dominicanas!

Celebrando la Dominicanidad presentamos la siguiente lista de las historias más recientes que hemos recibido por autores y personajes populares provenientes de la República Dominicana para adultos y niños. Read More ›

Orquesta en su casa: LPA at Casita Maria

The Boro-Linc project is bringing performances and projects from the Lincoln Center campus to the other boroughs. Read More ›

Podcast #43: Marlon James and Salman Rushdie on Storytelling

Salman Rushdie talked with Marlon James about Jamaican archetypes, language, and Gay Talese for this week's literary double whammy of a podcast.Read More ›

"Paroles de Femmes" is French for "Words of Women"

What could be more gratifying than a talented group of performers that can deliver a laudable show! Well, that is precisely what we saw on March 27 at the Mid-Manhattan Library in the program Paroles de Femmes, Femmes de Paroles, honoring Haitian Women Writers.Read More ›

Reclaiming My West Indian Roots, with Poetry

As a young girl growing up in Jamaica — and later in Brooklyn, NY — I often heard the poetry of Louise Bennett (Jamaicans affectionately call her "Miss Lou") permeate the air. One of my earliest recollections of Miss Lou’s lyricism was hearing the term mout amassi (big mouth). The term comes from the title of one of her most popular poems about a young lady, Liza, who loves to gossip and chat.

To be called a "mout amassi" 

... Read More ›

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