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Blog Posts by Subject: Brooklyn

The Last Nostrand Streetcar: Max Hubacher's New York Photography

A prolific amateur photographer and local historian, Hubacher documented New York City and its environs with a seemingly objective eye, the typed or handwritten captions on the verso of each photograph often markedly specific in terms of date and location.Read More ›

January Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

Last year, the Mid-Manhattan Library hosted distinguished scholars and authors at the Author @ The Library series. Some of the topics presented included photography, education, science and technology, New York City, performing and visual arts, politics and government, religion and sports. Read More ›

The Best New York City Novels by Neighborhood

For the reader who just can't get enough of those busy city streets, or is just dying to know where exactly in the five boroughs their favorite characters are inhabiting, here is a list of famous New York City-based novels according to the neighborhood in which they take place—complete with an interactive map of nearby landmarks and attractions!Read More ›

Neighborhood Nostalgia: Bushwick, Brooklyn Photos

Remember how the neighborhood used to look? Well, for a very happy #TBT, we're indulging in some neighborhood nostalgia for Bushwick, Brooklyn.Read More ›

NYC Rapid Transit in Maps, 1845-1921: The Street Railroads of New York and Vicinity

We can gain a deep understanding of the development of the city’s public transit infrastructure simply by examining nine maps published between 1845 and 1921. Read More ›

Then & Now: Dinanda Nooney in 1970s Brooklyn

Between January 1978 and April 1979, Nooney networked her way through Brooklyn documenting residences and their occupants, asking each for a referral to another willing subject. Over 150 families or individuals entrusted her to capture glimpses into their private worlds and personal tastes.Read More ›

Absolute Sale! NYC Land Auction Catalogs in the Map Division

Nearly one hundred land auctioneering pamphlets from the 1860s to 1920s and covering the Bronx, Manhattan, and Brooklyn were digitized this past year. With their richly designed covers, these promotional brochures provide modern day researchers with a window onto neighborhood development and changing patterns of land use in the city. Read More ›

Where in New York is Sesame Street?

Can I tell you how to get to Sesame Street? Well, I can try. You can get to the Sesame Street Subway Stop by the A, B, 1, or 2 trains, which if you check any MTA map, do not intersect at any current station.Read More ›

Fiction Atlas: Brooklyn in Children's Fiction and Picture Books (Part II)

Where in the world are you reading about? Fiction finds its settings in all corners of the world (and some places only imagined in our minds) but there's something special about fiction set in a familiar city or neighborhood. Let's take a trip out of Manhattan for now, and into the lively borough of Brooklyn! This is one of the most storied areas that make up New York City.

Settlers from the Dutch West India Company first founded the Village of Bruckelen in 1646, though the Lenape Native Americans had lived on the land that makes up the county for hundreds 

... Read More ›

ON THE AIR: Music Landmarks in NYC - Yankee Doodle to Jay-Z

Pearl Street Native/Indigenous

AIR is a Native American and ancient colloquialism for music and voice, as heard upon the earth. Musicians and singers performed at festivals at sacred places like Pearl Street, where shells mounded for centuries, in Lenape tradition, to honor and "give thanks" for the sun, moon, stars, rain, wind and all elements of the air.

New Amsterdam. ca. 1625 - People arrived to the various ceremonies and festivals along the East River shoreline via rafts, canoes and by walking down the main island trail (widened for vehicles in the 

... Read More ›

October Reader's Den: "Buddhaland Brooklyn" by Richard C. Morais - Week 5

Welcome back to the October 2013 edition of the Reader's Den!

This is our final week (pages 198-240; chapters 13-15) of Buddhaland Brooklyn by Richard C. Morais. If you missed any of this month's discussions, then you can revisit earlier weeks:

Week 1: Introduction and Reading Schedule Week 2: ... Read More ›

October Reader's Den: "Buddhaland Brooklyn" by Richard C. Morais - Week 4

Welcome back to the October 2013 edition of the Reader's Den!

For week 4, we read pages 138-197 (chapters 9-12), of Buddhaland Brooklyn by Richard C. Morais, a continuation of this year's New York theme. It is not too late to join the discussion!

Remember that you can catch up with us and comment on any of posts at anytime in the future. If you need a copy of the book, then you can reserve one through the NYPL catalog. The book is available in both 

... Read More ›

October Reader's Den: "Buddhaland Brooklyn" by Richard C. Morais - Week 3

Welcome back to the October 2013 edition of the Reader's Den!

We are at the half-way mark, Week 3 (chapters 5-8; pages 70-137), of Buddhaland Brooklyn by Richard C. Morais, a continuation of this year's New York theme. If you need a copy of the book, then you can reserve one through the NYPL catalogue. The book is available in both print and

... Read More ›

October Reader's Den: "Buddhaland Brooklyn" by Richard C. Morais, Week 2

Welcome back to October 2013 edition of the Reader's Den!

Our title this month is Buddhaland Brooklyn by Richard C. Morais, a continuation of this year's New York theme. For week two, we read chapters 1-4 (pages 1-69). If you need a copy of the book, then you can reserve it through the NYPL catalogue. The book is available in both print and

... Read More ›

October Reader's Den: "Buddhaland Brooklyn" by Richard C. Morais - Week 1

"It was strange, like a dream, to be in Japan one moment and America the next."

Welcome to the October 2013 installment of the New York Public Library's online book discussion group—the Reader's Den. In continuation of this year's New York theme, our title this month is Buddhaland Brooklyn by Richard C. Morais.

Just before his fortieth birthday Seido Oda, a monk since the age of eleven, is tasked with 

... Read More ›

Not For Sale: The Iconic Brooklyn Bridge Celebrates 130 Years

For 130 years, the Brooklyn Bridge has been an icon of the New York City landscape—longer if you account for the 13 years required to construct it. This beloved connection between boroughs is still in use while many of its contemporaries have been replaced or dismantled worldwide.

When the bridge opened in 1883, New York was a different sort of town. Also referred to as either the New York Bridge or East River Bridge until its official naming in 1915, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world when it was built. New York and Brooklyn were still

... Read More ›

Fiction Atlas: Brooklyn in Children's Fiction and Picture Books (Part I)

Where in the world are you reading about? Fiction finds its settings in all corners of the world (and some places only imagined in our minds) but there's something special about fiction set in a familiar city or neighborhood. Let's take a trip out of Manhattan for now, and into the lively borough of Brooklyn! This is one of the most storied areas that make up New York City.

Settlers from the Dutch West India Company first founded the Village of Bruckelen in 1646, though the Lenape Native Americans had lived on the land that makes up the county for hundreds 

... Read More ›

Short-Term Research Fellows: A Closer Look at Brooklyn History

As a graduate student whose dissertation examines the development of Brooklyn in the nineteenth century, I have spent more hours than I care to count the past several years poring through documents in the Brooklyn Historical Society, the Brooklyn Public Library and other repositories in what was formerly the nation's third-largest city and is now New York City's most populous borough. Recently however, through the New York Public Library's Short-Term Research Fellowship Program and 

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Jane McGonigal and NYPL present Find the Future: The Game

For 100 years, The New York Public Library's landmark Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street and its world-renowned collections have inspired people everywhere to find their futures. In honor of the Centennial Celebration, pioneering game designer Jane McGonigal helped the Library kick off its Weekend Festival with Find 

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Changing the Changing City

Seeking further enlightenment into the city we call home, I recently took a class on the literary and cultural history of New York City. Among the many themes common to New York City novels we discussed was the portrayal of the city itself as a character with power to shape the lives of its citizens.

Many of us New Yorkers have felt this pressure in our own lives: we choose where to live based on our budgets, our hobbies, our family situation, and often our ethnic, linguistic or religious 

... Read More ›
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