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Blog Posts by Subject: Harlem

Countee Cullen Remembered With Exhibits and Celebration

Celebrate Countee Cullen’s birthday on Tuesday, May 31 at the Countee Cullen Library and the Jean Blackwell Hutson Research and Reference Division of the Schomburg Center.Read More ›

Schomburg Treasures: Writers' Program, New York City

Material relating to the WPA Writers' Program in New York City and the book The Negro in New York.Read More ›

Live From the Reading Room: Claude McKay to Walter White

Today’s episode features a letter from Jamaican-American Harlem renaissance era poet and writer Claude McKay to NAACP leader and civil rights activist, Walter White.Read More ›

Live From the Reading Room: Nella Larsen to 'Eddie'

Today’s episode features a note from Harlem Renaissance writer Nella Larsen to an unidentified friend—“Eddie”—regarding a social gathering preceding the wedding of Yolande Du Bois and Countee Cullen. Read More ›

Live from the Reading Room: Nathan Woodard to Alice Childress

A love letter from musician and composer Nathan Woodard to his wife and creative collaborator Alice Childress.Read More ›

Live from the Reading Room: Aaron Douglas to Alta Sawyer Douglas

Today’s episode features a memorable love note from leading Harlem Renaissance painter, illustrator, and graphic artist Aaron Douglas to his wife and life partner Alta Sawyer Douglas, an esteemed educator and Harlemite. Read More ›

Live from the Reading Room: Arturo Schomburg to Langston Hughes

Today’s letter features correspondence between Arturo Alfonso Schomburg and Langston Hughes. In the excerpt below, Schomburg speaks with Hughes regarding acquisitions for The Division of Negro Literature, History and Prints—the forerunner to today’s Schomburg Center.Read More ›

The Harlem Burial Ground

Another African Burial Ground was officially “discovered” in New York City a few days ago. If this is news to most, it is not to preservationists, historians, and archivists who have been aware of the existence of the cemetery for years. Read More ›

Black Women Artists: Augusta Savage

Katherine Ellington, a New York City medical humanities scholar and researcher, discusses the work and legacy of legendary artist Augusta Savage.Read More ›

The American Negro Theatre's Groundbreaking Radio Program, "New World A-Coming"

In September 1945, our American Negro Theatre (ANT) became the first theatrical company to present a radio program. Titled "New World A-Coming," the series aired Sunday afternoons for 30 minutes and was designed "to promote the universality of scripts, characters and performing talent."Read More ›

Schomburg Treasures: WPA Artwork

The Schomburg Center's collection of WPA artwork is now available on the NYPL's Digital Collections site.Read More ›

Where in New York is Sesame Street?

Can I tell you how to get to Sesame Street? Well, I can try. You can get to the Sesame Street Subway Stop by the A, B, 1, or 2 trains, which if you check any MTA map, do not intersect at any current station.Read More ›

Pic Pick of The Century: An Homage to Walter Dean Myers

It is with sad news that I write here today, a very short poem of a great writer that has just gone away. A man who's presence is no longer here, But whose words and spirit would remain and never disappear.Read More ›

A People's History of Harlem: Celebrating Its Launch!

As NYPL's oral history projects continue... we've launched our oral history project in Harlem at 115th Street Library!Read More ›

Black History Battle : Trivia!

Come and show off your knowledge of past and present African-American culture! Fun for all. Ages 10 - adult. Read More ›

ON THE AIR: Music Landmarks in NYC - Yankee Doodle to Jay-Z

Pearl Street Native/Indigenous

AIR is a Native American and ancient colloquialism for music and voice, as heard upon the earth. Musicians and singers performed at festivals at sacred places like Pearl Street, where shells mounded for centuries, in Lenape tradition, to honor and "give thanks" for the sun, moon, stars, rain, wind and all elements of the air.

New Amsterdam. ca. 1625 - People arrived to the various ceremonies and festivals along the East River shoreline via rafts, canoes and by walking down the main island trail (widened for vehicles in the 

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TeachNYPL: 'Grace Aguilar's American Journey,' A Common Core-aligned Research Experience (Gr. 11-12)

By 1900, New York City and the United States were undergoing waves of dramatic, traumatic change. Industrialization, Reconstruction and a surge of immigrants from across the globe were remaking every aspect of life, from transportation to education, leisure, labor, race relations and the status of women. One response to the dislocations and turmoil of this era was the reform efforts that we now classify as the “Progressive Movement.”

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Fiction Atlas: Harlem in Children's Fiction and Picture Books

Where in the world are you reading about? Fiction finds its settings in all corners of the world (and some places only imagined in our minds) but there's something special about fiction set in a familiar city or neighborhood. This week I thought I'd tackle another famous neighborhood of Manhattan, but now we're traveling uptown to Harlem.

Originally founded by the Dutch in 1658, it was named after a Netherlands village (Haarlem). The character of this stretch of Northern Manhattan, however is most known as a center of African-American commerce and art 

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Hubert Harrison: Harlem Radical

Dr. Jeffrey B. Perry will discuss his book, Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918, Saturday March 5th 2pm @ Hamilton Fish Park Library.

"Hubert Harrison is the most significant Black democratic socialist of early-twentieth century America." —Cornel West 

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American Rags-to-Riches Mythos: The Madam C. J. Walker Saga, Part 1

"I am a woman who came from the cotton fields of the South. From there I was promoted to the washtub. From there I was promoted to the cook kitchen. And from there I promoted myself into the business of Manufacturing hair goods and preparations. I have built my own factory on my own ground. Madam Walker National Negro Business League Convention, July 1912." Bundles, A'Lelia. Madam C.J. Walker, 2009.

Almost every school child has heard of

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