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Posts from New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center

The Jerome Robbins Dance Division Fellows Project

Meet the six fellows chosen by the Committee for the Jerome Robbins Dance Division, each granted an honorarium to support their research and writing during six months of immersion in the collections.Read More ›

The Music Division's Clipping File: Performers and Performances

Part three of three, delving into the performers and performances you can find out of the millions of articles in our clipping files.Read More ›

Hamlet Turns Left: Handwritten Shakespeare Promptbooks at LPA

The Library for the Performing Arts has several hundred of these promptbooks, and staff are working to make them more accessible to researchers.Read More ›

British Soldiers' Theatre During the Revolutionary War

When Shakespeare wrote “All the World’s a Stage,” he probably wasn’t thinking that his words would someday be performed in an occupied city by an invading army. Nevertheless, during the American Revolution theater seemed to spring up in the oddest of places, often in productions acted by soldiers. Read More ›

"Archives of Sound" at the Library for the Performing Arts

Organization, description, and presentation of sound is the theme for this exhibit, and listeners are offered a peek into how archival audio is made available to the public.Read More ›

Ep. 26 "It Has Enriched My Life" | Library Stories

During her songwriting process, Sara comes to the Library to discover the rich histories and traditions that have shaped folk music around the world.Read More ›

The Mystery Shakespeare Plot

A clue to a mysterious performance that at the time may have been "the finest spectacle that has ever been presented on the American stage."Read More ›

The Music Division's Clipping File: The Scandals

Part two of three, delving into examples of what you can find out of the millions of articles in our clipping files.Read More ›

Falstaff On the Road: Or, Why Dickens Was Right About America

Two prime examples of actors and actor/managers who based their later careers on performing Sir John Falstaff.Read More ›

Finding a Life at The New York Public Library: Remembering Shannon Bolin 1917-2016

Although Ms. Bolin is best known for her role as Meg Boyd in the original production of Damn Yankees (1955), the Music Division best remembers her in her association with composer Marc Blitzstein.Read More ›

The Music Division's Clipping File: Musicians and Politics

Part one of three, delving into examples of what you can find out of the millions of articles in our clipping files.Read More ›

100 Years (Or So) Ago in Dance: La Marseillaise

Isadora Duncan received a huge ovation for La Marseillaise. She was to repeat the performance again several weeks later, and a reviewer in the French theater journal La Rampe exclaimed breathlessly that "she lifted souls to the sublime and left them trembling with excitement."Read More ›

Ep. 20 "Those Endless Possibilities" | Library Stories

As a dancer for the New York City Ballet and a self-described "nerd" for ballet history, Silas has made the dance collection at LPA an integral part of his life and career.Read More ›

The Black Rock Coalition: Empowering Artists Who Break the Mold

In 1985 the Black Rock Coalition (BRC) was formed as an outlet for alternative Black musicians to showcase their talents.Read More ›

O Romeo, Romeo

Why is Margaret Mather's 1882 performance as Juliet, in William Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet,' so well remembered? Perhaps this illustration of the balcony scene, apparently in her own hand, has something to do with it. Read More ›

100 Years (Or So) Ago in Dance: Florence Mills

Florence Mills was famed for her birdlike voice as well as her spontaneous dancing during her numbers. She was one of the most popular entertainers of the early 1920s in New York, London, and Paris, and yet, perhaps because she died at age 32, her fame has not survived. Read More ›

100 Years (Or So) Ago in Dance: Ruth St. Denis and Ted Shawn

The 1915-1916 tour, which included the Palace Theatre run, was the first to feature dancers from the Ruth St. Denis School of Dancing and its Related Arts, which was founded in the summer of 1915 and which became known, in a mingling of the two founders’ names, as Denishawn.Read More ›

Dance Broadside Collection on Exhibit in LPA Reading Room

The Dance Broadside Collection was recently processed and made available to the public. A new exhibit showcasing a few pieces from this collection is now located in the Library for Performing Arts third floor reading room. Read More ›

A Tribute to David Bowie

As a tribute to David Bowie's life, his music and his acting, here is a list of works by him as well as about him.Read More ›

Public Domain Theater: The Black Crook

This month, thanks to the Library’s release of all of our high resolution photographs of objects with no known U.S. copyright restrictions, the promptbook, the sheet music, and the photos may be used without restriction for any purpose, including commercially.Read More ›
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