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Posts from New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center

2,000 Public Domain Prints Available From the Jerome Robbins Dance Division

The Dance Division collects "prints depicting dance," covering a wide range of subjects, including portraits of dancers, dance performances and rehearsals, spectacle and horse ballet, advertisements showing dance, and satire. Here are a few favorites from the public domain.Read More ›

100 Years (Or So) Ago in Dance: The Whirl of Life

Happy New Year! Rather than look back at 2015, we’re going back 100 years for the first in a series of blog  posts featuring events in dance history from (about) 100 years ago. And I’m starting with something that is personally meaningful to me, as a ballroom dancer: Vernon and Irene Castle in the silent film, The Whirl of Life.

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Head Shots: Doubles, Triples and Quads

These double and triple exposures made more memorable headshots which showed multiple aspects of the performer. At worst, they interfered with the casting directors' ability to imagine the performer in roles.Read More ›

The Library's New Mellon Director

The Library's Mellon Director leads the Library's four research centers and their 460 staff members—the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street; the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture; the Science, Industry and Business Library; and the Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center. Read More ›

Head Shots: Tallulah Bankhead's Sleeve

There are at least three portraits from this studio session with the same elegant profile, hair, make-up, jewelry, and blouse. The raw silk blouse, with its uniquely draped sleeve, is an unusual choice for a head shot, since the sunburst effect of the sleeve cap commands the eye.Read More ›

Head Shots: Dulcie Cooper

If you’ve never heard of Dulcie Cooper, don’t worry, there’s still time to get familiar: two portraits of her are on display in Head Shots through December 30.Read More ›

Alice Live! on Television

In the 1954 and 1955 seasons, two lavish productions of Alice in Wonderland were premiered on television. In each case, they were developed to attract families to the presenting series and their sponsors. Read More ›

Evelyn Waugh and His "Most Offensive Work"

While in Hollywood consulting on a potential film adaptation of Brideshead that never materialized, Waugh observed American West Coast culture up close. His reaction was... not flattering.Read More ›

Musical of the Month: Golden Dawn

Considered today, Golden Dawn is obviously problematic on multiple levels, and the lack of any revivals of the show is not necessarily a bad thing. However, the study of non-canonical works like Golden Dawn remains crucial to understanding the history of musicals.Read More ›

Kate Claxton Head Shots: This Week Only

The cartes de visite, cabinet photographs and stereograms of Kate Claxton, an intensely photogenic actress.Read More ›

Contact Strips and Head Shots

The advent of contact sheets was great for photography studios and of course, actors and their agents.Read More ›

Musical of the Month: Little Nemo

Little Nemo opened on Broadway at the opulent New Amsterdam Theatre on October 20, 1908, after a three-week tryout in Philadelphia. According to the New York Times, the city had “seen nothing bigger or better in extravaganza than ‘Little Nemo.’” It had also never seen a theatrical production more expensive.Read More ›

Triptych Head Shots

Two unusual examples of triptychs, which combine headshots with character portraits.Read More ›

The Jitney Players, The Traveling Theater Troupe

During the Elizabethan era, traveling troupes of actors would perform in different towns throughout the United Kingdom. Inspired by these theatrical artists, Horace Bushnell Cheney and his wife Alice Keating Cheney established the Jitney Players in the United States in 1923.Read More ›

The Stereograph Headshot

When we started to think about an exhibition on Head Shots based on the Library for the Performing Arts’ collections, we discovered that almost every format in the history of photographic portraits was used as a headshot. Read More ›

Frank Sinatra's "The House I Live In"

The Sinatra: An American Icon exhibition has many wonderful media stations for visitors—songs, excerpts from television specials, films trailers and featurettes, and a juke box. But the one that is garnering the most attention is “The House I Live In,” the RKO short subject that won Sinatra his first Oscar. Read More ›

Sinatra at the Stage Door Canteen

We have received many questions recently about this photo, the secondary key image for the exhibition.Read More ›

Across A Crowded Room: 2015 Edition

After the wildly successful 2013 edition of Across A Crowded Room, we are about to launch a second edition that is more exciting than ever before.Read More ›

"...a half-acre of strings..." Sinatra on the Radio

LPA is hosting public programs about listening to Sinatra on the radio, as thousands of Americans would do every week. Read More ›

Merce Cunningham Archive

The Jerome Robbins Dance Division is proud to announce that the Merce Cunningham Dance Foundation Inc, records, Additions is now open. This collection is 141.44 linear feet comprising 315 boxes, 41 tubes and 116.1 gigabytes of electronic records and digitized content. Read More ›
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