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Posts from New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center

Sharing Dance Digitally: Understanding Issues of Copyright & Access

Intern Lexa Armstrong shares what she learned while working in the Jerome Robbins Dance Division.Read More ›

Digital Footprints: Creating a Loie Fuller Database

Intern Juliana DeVaan shares what she learned while working in the Jerome Robbins Dance Division.Read More ›

The Show That Got Away: Lucky in the Rain

Sherman Yellen writes about "the one that everyone assured [me] was destined for great success" but "eluded [my] grasp and got away."Read More ›

Ep. 77 "I Wouldn't Be Who I Am Without That Library" | Library Stories

"Hello Dolly" star Bette Midler describes researching her character at the New York Library for the Performing Arts.Read More ›

New Federal Theatre: A Brief History

The New Federal Theatre was founded in 1970. From its inception to today, the Theatre is as an iconic performance space for many widely recognized African-American actors, directors, and playwrights. Read More ›

Isadora Duncan and Her Collaborators

Guest post by New York Public Library Short-Term Fellow Chantal Frankenbach, California State University, Sacramento

The American modern dancer Isadora Duncan (1877–1927) was one of the most acclaimed and influential artists of her time. Notorious for her romantic involvements with the likes of British theater critic Gordon Craig, German biologist Ernst Haeckel, and millionaire Paris Singer, Duncan also attracted artists and intellectuals as collaborators in her work as a dancer. These collaborations have a great deal to tell us of her wide-ranging ideas about the 

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Bugaku: Japanese Imperial Court Dance

For much of its history, bugaku remained an exclusive and privileged experience, performed only at the Japanese imperial court and, very rarely, as part of religious rituals at temples or shrines. Read More ›

10 Great Books on Lou Reed, The Velvet Underground, and 1960s Counterculture

The Library has just announced the acquisition of the Lou Reed Archive, and we're celebrating the life and legacy of this rock icon with a series of displays, programs, and performances. Read More ›

African Dance Interview Project Year Two Videos Now Available

The Jerome Robbins Dance Division is pleased to belatedly announce that the final seven interviews documented with the Mertz Gilmore Foundation grant to record African dancers and choreographers working and teaching in New York are now onlineRead More ›

Stage to Screen, New York to London (or Vice Versa)

Exploring the Library for the Performing Arts' Cinema Series 40 Years of London and New York Theatre on Film.Read More ›

Which Witch Is Which? The Other Salem/McCarthy Parable

Featuring the research and analysis of Emma Winter Zeig, volunteer and former intern, on one of the songs discovered for "Laughter, Agita and Rage": Political Cabaret in Isaiah Sheffer's New York. Read More ›

Macabre Imagery: Visual Representations of the Dance of Death

A new case exhibit on the third floor of the Library for the Performing Arts presents a small historical survey of the characteristic imagery and common features of visual representations of the dance of death.Read More ›

The 50th Anniversary of 9 Evenings: Theatre and Engineering and Experiments in Art and Technology, Incorporated (E.A.T.)

In celebration of its anniversary, a current case exhibit on the third floor of The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts highlights materials related to 9 Evenings.Read More ›

"Brother, Can You Spare a Dime"

A look at the White Studio photograph from the 1932 edition of the revue Americana. Read More ›

Your October Playlist : 8 Recommendations

In the weeks leading up to Halloween we watch scary movies and we read scary stories but are we listening to enough scary music? No, probably not! Here are some suggestions to get you in the spooky spirit.Read More ›

Searching for Theory in the Performing Arts Archives

What is repeated is important. I had always been taught that phrase in relationship to literary analysis, but in researching Hallie Flanagan Davis it seems the most apt advice for archival recovery of theory as well.Read More ›

J. Rosamond Johnson and "Lift Every Voice"

The National Museum of African American History & Culture opens on September 24, 2016. The Smithsonian has decided to name the celebration “Lift Every Voice,” borrowing the phrase from the song known as America’s Black National Anthem.Read More ›

Music for Eating: Discographies Meet Recipes in the Rodgers & Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound

New Release catalogs are useful today for researchers looking to determine the year a particular recording was released, and for the range of musical genres covered by a certain record label. While going through a section of EMI catalogs and brochures, we came across an interesting promotion for a geographically-themed LP series. Read More ›

Pearl Primus in "Strange Fruit"

The Library for the Performing Arts’s exhibition on political cabaret focuses on the three series associated with Isaiah Sheffer, whose Papers are in the Billy Rose Theatre Division.Read More ›

Music For Moderns at Town Hall, 1957

Anahid Ajemian and George Avakian put on an ambitious and eclectic concert series that blended the music and musicians of different worlds.Read More ›
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