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Posts from Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

The Last Nostrand Streetcar: Max Hubacher's New York Photography

A prolific amateur photographer and local historian, Hubacher documented New York City and its environs with a seemingly objective eye, the typed or handwritten captions on the verso of each photograph often markedly specific in terms of date and location.Read More ›

20 Databases to Get You Back to School

Besides the textbooks and school supplies, there are plenty of resources online to help you with your studies. Whether you’re practicing your reading skills, prepping for the science fair, beginning your first research paper, or lesson planning one of these activities, the New York Public Library’s databases are ready to support you in your learning.Read More ›

Now Screening: American Founding Era Papers

Everyone's talking about the ten dollar Founding Father these days. If you are researching the Revolutionary Era, the New York Public Library's database American Founding Era Papers is for you. Read More ›

Women in Translation Month: Yiddish

August is Women in Translation Month. Celebrate Yiddish women writers in English translation with poetry, fiction, memoirs, prayers, and cookbooks from the Library’s collection.Read More ›

Gold Medal Magazines

Opening ceremonies are a few days away, and so the eyes of the world are turning to Rio and the beginning of the 2016 Summer Olympic Games. With dozens of events, some more obscure to American viewers than others, it might be time to read up on the ins and outs of these sports.Read More ›

Genealogy Tips: Probate Records in New York

In New York City, there are three ways to get started researching probate records.Read More ›

Recent Acquisitions in the Jewish Division: August 2016

The following titles on our Recent Acquisitions Display are just a few of our new books, which are available at the reference desk in the Dorot Jewish Division.Read More ›

Now Screening: Around the World in 22 Periodicals

These new magazine and newspaper titles are international in scope, covering nine cities, six countries, and three continents. Whether you're interested in WWII-era Russia or last year's Chanel couture runway, the only passport you'll need is your library card.Read More ›

The First Photograph Taken in Absolute Darkness

A group of men in suits, sitting in a theater in complete darkness. How was this photo taken?Read More ›

Hannah Lawrence Schieffelin and Women's Experiences in Revolutionary America

A New York woman's interactions with women of different cultures on the northern frontier of the American Revolution.Read More ›

Elizabeth De Hart Bleecker Diary, Summer 1803

Health and disease in early New York City.Read More ›

New York on the Front Line: The Black Tom Island Explosion, July 1916

On Sunday morning, July 30, 1916, at 2:08 a.m., one of the worst terrorist attacks in American history took place at Black Tom Island, New Jersey, a shipping facility located in New York Harbor. Read More ›

Cullman Center Recommends: 15 Books for Summer Reading

The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers has had seventeen classes of fellows in residence at The New York Public Library. These gifted independent scholars, creative writers, academics, and visual artists have produced more than one hundred books since 1999, and we recommend fifteen of their recent titles for 2016 summer reading.Read More ›

Stonewall in Pictures

The White House designation of Stonewall as a national monument prominently featured LGBT historical materials from our Manuscripts & Archives Division, available online in our Digital Collections. Read More ›

Genealogy Tips: Searching the Census by Address

Ever wondered who lived in your home before you? Or having trouble finding great-grandparents in old census records? If you are so inclined, and want to search the census by address, to see who lived in your American house many moons ago, this post explains how you can do that. Even better, all the information is available online for free. You will need an address... Read More ›

Recent Acquisitions in the Jewish Division: July 2016

The following titles on our Recent Acquisitions Display are just a few of our new books, which are available at the reference desk in the Dorot Jewish Division. Read More ›

Ports of Embarkation and Arrival: Brief Passages in U.S. Immigration History

Each Fourth of July finds more Americans kicking back under the fireworks to celebrate the birthday of the USA. In the years after the Revolutionary War, about five thousand immigrants arrived in the U.S. annually; in 2014, one million people obtained lawful permanent residency. Read More ›

The Writing on the Wall: Documenting Civil War History

As June turned into July in 1863, the residents of Vicksburg, Mississippi faced an increasingly dire summer. The city's newspaper, the Vicksburg Daily Citizen, was remarkable in that it both documented and physically represented the effects of the siege.Read More ›

Mary Katherine Goddard's Declaration of Independence

Most Americans in the revolutionary period found out who signed the Declaration of Independence in print, not parchment. Publicizing the signers’ names was a bold step considering that they were endorsing treason.Read More ›

Introducing Explora

This new platform from EBSCO is designed to assist students of all ages with their learning and research. There are three versions of Explora for elementary, middle, and high school students. Read More ›
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