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Posts from Stephen A. Schwarzman Building

Edith Magonigle and the Art War Relief

Called Art War Relief, members from a group of art societies formed a coalition under the auspices of the American Red Cross.Read More ›

Better Know a State: See the Nation, Through the American Guide Series

To keep the spirit of adventure and travel going all month long, a look into the Writers' Project Series of American Guide books, published in the 1930s-1940s and available from The New York Public Library and online.Read More ›

NYPLarcade: Summer Reading Games Day 2017

Please join TeenLIVE, NYPLarcade, and MyLibraryNYC at Summer Reading Games Day 2017! This event celebrates play, literacy, and games at the Library.Read More ›

Informed Archives: The Pentagon Papers and the Fight to Know

The celebration of the Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism prompted an exploration of our collections to celebrate the work and achievements of the Fourth Estate.Read More ›

The New York Public Library, 1911–13, as Reported by John H. Fedeler

John H. Fedeler accepted the position to manage The New York Public Library's "Central Building" in 1910. This would be a 24/7 job. With Fedeler's living quarters inside the Library, the question to ask is, "How did Fedeler handle his job during the early years?"Read More ›

#ThisPlaceMatters: Preservation Month Resources

May is Preservation Month! I know, there are only a few days left, but you can celebrate Preservation Month all year long with great books and other resources from The New York Public Library.Read More ›

Ep. 74 "A Bastion of Fact and Truth" | Library Stories

A journalist and author who won the Library's Bernstein award talks about the importance of supporting fact and evidence. Read More ›

Lower East Side Story: Beth Hamedrash Hagodol

The Library has a number of items that highlight the development and presence of synagogues in New York City, including at least one photographic collection wherein Beth Hamedrash Hagodol features prominently. This post pays tribute to the building, with a short history, and a view back to better days.Read More ›

Ep. 72 "A Key Role To Play" | Library Stories

Cullman Center Fellow and past Bernstein Book Award winner George Packer considers the role of journalists in society today.Read More ›

5 Mother’s Day Gifts for the Unstoppable Mom

Of course you could show her some love with flowers, a nice card, and a hug, but this Mother’s Day (psst, it’s May 14!) we’ve got exactly what you need for the strong, paradigm-shattering mom (or mom-figure) in your life. Read More ›

Informed Archives: The Environmental Action Coalition and the Birth of Earth Day

In January 2017, thousands gathered on Fifth Avenue and the surrounding area for the Women’s March. But this wasn’t the first time that this street was the home for a massive demonstration: almost fifty years ago, it was a primary thoroughfare for the first Earth Day celebration.Read More ›

Transportation, Communications, and Colonial War

How the British Empire built the transportation and communications infrastructure that allowed them to win the colonial contest for eastern North America.Read More ›

11 Facts About NYPL for #AprilFactsDay

The New York Public Library's Stephen A. Schwarzman building opened on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street in 1911. One of NYC's iconic landmarks, it welcomes millions of visitors a year to discover its inspiring public spaces, unparalleled research collections, and vibrant programs and exhibitions. But that's not the whole story about the building behind the Library Lions.Read More ›

Women's Lives in 1790s NYC: Stories from the Almshouse Records

The experience of women in 1790s New York City, from the records of the NYC Almshouse and Bridewell.Read More ›

The Other Mrs. Adams

During women's history month, consider the influence of "the other Mrs. Adams" on the American Revolution. Read More ›

Christopher Gray: an Appreciation

Architectural historian and New York Times columnist Christopher Gray died last week. He was 66. Milstein Division librarians took a moment to reflect on Gray's work, and his impact on the written history of New York City and research of its built environment. Read More ›

Pi(e) Day in the Map Division

Taking inspiration from the delightful National Cookie Day post, the Map Division is using Pi(e) Day as cause to celebrate not only our love for pie (the eating kind), but also, the wonderful variety of pictorial maps in the collections of the Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division.Read More ›

The Spirit of Will Eisner: Celebrating a Graphic Novel Pioneer

Will Eisner is commonly recognized as the father of the graphic novel and is considered one of the most innovative and influential comic book artists of the 20th century.Read More ›

Tammany Hall's Nineteenth-Century Retweets

The surprisingly modern public relations tactics of Tammany Hall--New York's most infamous nineteenth-century society.Read More ›

10 Great Books on Lou Reed, The Velvet Underground, and 1960s Counterculture

The Library has just announced the acquisition of the Lou Reed Archive, and we're celebrating the life and legacy of this rock icon with a series of displays, programs, and performances. Read More ›
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