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Posts from the General Research Division

Now Screening: New Yorker Digital Archive

Ever since its launch in 1925, the New Yorker has been a fixture of newsstands, coffee tables, and commuter bags. The New York Public Library recently acquired the New Yorker Digital Archive, a database that provides access to every issue of the New Yorker, often including new issues days before their print release. Now you can read the New Yorker from home, school, or anywhere else in the world with an internet connection and your library card.Read More ›

Magical Book Train: Librarians Summon Books to Rose Main Reading Room

As if by magic, books can now be delivered from underground to the Rose Main Reading Room in five minutes flat. The Library’s new, $2.6 million “book train” connects the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building's iconic reading room to the Milstein Research Stacks underground. All told, 4 million volumes can be stored in the state-of-the-art facility under Bryant Park—and librarians can conjure them with a touch of a button.Read More ›

Finding George R.R. Martin's Earliest Work

What many may not realize is that before becoming a household name in fantasy, Martin began as a science fiction writer, also dabbling in other genres like horror. Finding these early works can be challenging because Martin’s short stories, novellas, and novelettes were often published in pulp magazines.Read More ›

Now Screening: American Founding Era Papers

Everyone's talking about the ten dollar Founding Father these days. If you are researching the Revolutionary Era, the New York Public Library's database American Founding Era Papers is for you. Read More ›

Gold Medal Magazines

Opening ceremonies are a few days away, and so the eyes of the world are turning to Rio and the beginning of the 2016 Summer Olympic Games. With dozens of events, some more obscure to American viewers than others, it might be time to read up on the ins and outs of these sports.Read More ›

Now Screening: Around the World in 22 Periodicals

These new magazine and newspaper titles are international in scope, covering nine cities, six countries, and three continents. Whether you're interested in WWII-era Russia or last year's Chanel couture runway, the only passport you'll need is your library card.Read More ›

The Writing on the Wall: Documenting Civil War History

As June turned into July in 1863, the residents of Vicksburg, Mississippi faced an increasingly dire summer. The city's newspaper, the Vicksburg Daily Citizen, was remarkable in that it both documented and physically represented the effects of the siege.Read More ›

The Right Stuff: Finding the Best Biography Database for Your Research

Find the best biography database for your subject, whether it is Alan Turing or Beyoncé.Read More ›

Now Screening: Telegraph Historical Archive and the British Popular Press

Now Screening highlights NYPL's recent electronic resource acquisitions. This month: Telegraph Historical Archive, 1855-2000, available at any NYPL location, or remotely using your library card.Read More ›

Before It Was Mrs. Dalloway... Novels That Came From Short Stories

Mrs. Dalloway is not the only novel to begin its life as a short story. With the New York Public Library's extensive collection of online newspapers, magazines, and journals, you can read many of these published short stories at home and compare them to their later, expanded versions—all you need is your library card. Read More ›

The Art Museum Underground

Did you know our subway and commuter rail stations, bridges, and tunnels are home to more than three hundred works of art?Read More ›

Finding the Pulitzer Prize Winners for Journalism at the Library

While the Pulitzer website includes the winning work for each recipient, you may be interested in reading more from these journalists and their publications. We have the online resources to support your curiosity! Read More ›

Designing Women: The Art of Cloth Bindings

Cloth bindings flourished during the 19th and early 20th centuries, and their designers exercised incredible creativity until the more economical dust jacket took hold as the book's decorative wrapping.Read More ›

The Leap Day Bachelor List of 1888

The editors of the newspaper decided that women could make better use of their quadrennial opportunity if they had a better lay of the marriageable land. So, the newspaper published an annotated list of eligible Chicago bachelors.Read More ›

Now Screening: Caribbean Newspapers

Caribbean Newspapers encompasses twenty countries during their occupation by European colonizers and chronicles a tumultuous time in Caribbean history.Read More ›

A Trivial Blog Post for Serious People

An unassuming black notebook contains the earliest draft of Oscar Wilde’s play The Importance of Being Earnest, written by hand and with the author’s frequent emendations.Read More ›

Immortality and the Fear of Death

Philosophical writings on mortality and the fear of death.Read More ›

Exhibit Checklist - Celebrating The Little Magazine in Contemporary America

View the exhibition checklist for Celebrating The Little Magazine in Contemporary America.Read More ›

The Legacy of a Librarian: Carolyn Ulrich's Little Magazines

In 1947, Carolyn F. Ulrich, Chief of the Periodicals Division co-edited the book “The Little Magazine: A History and Bibliography”, which inspired the recent publication “The Little Magazine in Contemporary America.” Both are anthologies of original essays by literary magazine editors honoring their unique and significant role in our social, cultural and political life. Read More ›

Evelyn Waugh and His "Most Offensive Work"

While in Hollywood consulting on a potential film adaptation of Brideshead that never materialized, Waugh observed American West Coast culture up close. His reaction was... not flattering.Read More ›
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