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Posts from the Schomburg Photographs and Prints Division

Black Aesthetics: Revisiting 'From Dapper to Dope' and Considering Black Style Traditions

To centralize the experiences and creative worlds of black people in portraits, paintings, literature, and poetry is to engage in black aesthetics. Black aesthetics extend, too, to fashion and personal style.Read More ›

Black Aesthetics in the Digital Collections: Thoughts on Black Portraiture

Portraits greatly influence the way that we perceive ourselves and each other. One could consider black portraiture to be a facet of black aesthetics, in that it centralizes the black image, illustrates a black existence, and thus implies a cultural position.Read More ›

Black Dance at the Schomburg: A Visual History

The language of dance as told by black people through photographs in our Digital Collections.Read More ›

Black Dance at the Schomburg: The Black Iris Project

On July 14 The Black Iris Project will perform Madiba—a dance piece based on the life and legacy of humanitarian and anti-apartheid activist, Nelson “Madiba” Mandela. The performance is set to an original score by black classical composer Carman Moore.Read More ›

Live From the Reading Room: Ada "Bricktop" Smith to Louis "Satchmo" Armstrong

Today’s episode features a letter from jazz singer, dancer, and nightclub owner Ada Smith, jazz trumpeter, composer, singer, and "auto-archivist" Louis Armstrong.Read More ›

Celebrating Queer Voices in Black Music History

Housed in our vast collection of materials and resources on black LGBTQ identity, which includes the In The Life Archive, are the portrait collections of blues singers Gertrude Ma Rainey, Ethel Waters, and Bessie Smith in the Photographs and Prints Division.Read More ›

On Black Fatherhood and Muhammad Ali

Remembering Ali as a champion father figure in the black community—exemplifying strength, confidence, and a love for people around the world.Read More ›

Live From the Reading Room: Thomas Wright "Fats" Waller to Phil Ponce

Live from the Reading Room: Correspondence is a podcast series that aims to share interesting and engaging letters written by or to key historical figures from the African Diaspora. Read More ›

Exploring the Literary Within the Black Power Movement

When we explore the dynamics of the Black Power Movement, we must not fail to explore the Black Arts Movement as well. It was the artistic voice that helped increase political activism and express the importance of cultural values through various art forms. Read More ›

Live From the Reading Room: Philippa Schuyler to Josephine Schuyler

Live from the Reading Room: Correspondence is a podcast series that aims to share interesting and engaging letters written by or to key historical figures from the African Diaspora. Read More ›

Remembering Malcolm X Through the Women Who Knew Him

Our annual celebration of the birthday of Malcolm X will be held on May 19 in collaboration with the Malcolm X Museum. The all-women panel, Women Speak About Malcolm X, is sold out, but you may still join the discussion via LiveStream.Read More ›

Celebrating Miriam Makeba on the 56th Anniversary of Her Iconic Debut Album

Often called Harry Belafonte’s protégé or Mama Africa, today is the 56th anniversary of South African singer/songwriter Miriam Makeba’s debut album.Read More ›

Playwright Pays Homage To Legendary MCs With Play Cycle

Shaun Neblett, aka MC SNEB, is a playwright, educator, and founder of Changing Perceptions Theater. Read More ›

Scholarship Behind "Ghetto, The Invention of a Place, the History of an Idea"

A list of primary sources at the heart of Ghetto, The Invention of a Place, the History of an Idea, by Dr. Mitchell DuneierRead More ›

Granville T. Woods: An Early STEM Pioneer

He registered nearly 60 patents—ranging from the development of the telephone to the multiplex telegraph.Read More ›

Remembering Activist Paul Robeson

Alicia Perez, Communications Pre-Professional at the Schomburg Center, reflects on the lasting influence of activist Paul Robeson on his birthday.Read More ›

100 Years (Or So) Ago in Dance: Florence Mills

Florence Mills was famed for her birdlike voice as well as her spontaneous dancing during her numbers. She was one of the most popular entertainers of the early 1920s in New York, London, and Paris, and yet, perhaps because she died at age 32, her fame has not survived. Read More ›

Black Women Artists: Augusta Savage

Katherine Ellington, a New York City medical humanities scholar and researcher, discusses the work and legacy of legendary artist Augusta Savage.Read More ›

Black Life Matters Feature of the Week: A Bit Of Life

In today's feature of the week, Mary Yearwood, our in-house Curator of the Photographs and Prints Division, discusses the brilliance of renowned shutterbug Richard Saunders, and how he inspired her contribution to the exhibition.Read More ›

TeachNYPL: 'Little Lionhearts,' Young People in African-American Civil Rights Protests (Gr. 6-8)

"I could not move because history had me glued to the seat. It felt like Sojourner Truth's hands were pushing down on one shoulder, and Harriet Tubman's hand pushing down on another shoulder" —Claudette Colvin (Interview on Democracy Now, March 2013) Read More ›

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