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Posts by Barbara Cohen-Stratyner

Pearl Primus in "Strange Fruit"

The Library for the Performing Arts’s exhibition on political cabaret focuses on the three series associated with Isaiah Sheffer, whose Papers are in the Billy Rose Theatre Division.Read More ›

Are You Spoken For? An Ad Campaign and A Cultural Stereotype

The Billy Rose Theatre Division at the Library for the Performing Arts has an extensive collection that documents the development of television, including many examples of pitches made by networks to specific companies, like AT&T or Coty Cosmetics, outlining how each network’s programming would be a match for the company’s ideal consumer. Read More ›

The Other Secret Garden

The success of the Library's Anti-Prom, based on Frances Hodgson Burnett’s novel, The Secret Garden.Read More ›

Garden Fashion at Anti-Prom

It is almost time for the Library’s fabulous Anti-Prom. On Friday, June 17, New York teens will assemble on the steps of the Schwarzman Building and reveal to each other and the staff volunteers their prom wear. Read More ›

British Soldiers' Theatre During the Revolutionary War

When Shakespeare wrote “All the World’s a Stage,” he probably wasn’t thinking that his words would someday be performed in an occupied city by an invading army. Nevertheless, during the American Revolution theater seemed to spring up in the oddest of places, often in productions acted by soldiers. Read More ›

The Mystery Shakespeare Plot

A clue to a mysterious performance that at the time may have been "the finest spectacle that has ever been presented on the American stage."Read More ›

Falstaff On the Road: Or, Why Dickens Was Right About America

Two prime examples of actors and actor/managers who based their later careers on performing Sir John Falstaff.Read More ›

O Romeo, Romeo

Why is Margaret Mather's 1882 performance as Juliet, in William Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet,' so well remembered? Perhaps this illustration of the balcony scene, apparently in her own hand, has something to do with it. Read More ›

Head Shots: Doubles, Triples and Quads

These double and triple exposures made more memorable headshots which showed multiple aspects of the performer. At worst, they interfered with the casting directors' ability to imagine the performer in roles.Read More ›

Head Shots: Tallulah Bankhead's Sleeve

There are at least three portraits from this studio session with the same elegant profile, hair, make-up, jewelry, and blouse. The raw silk blouse, with its uniquely draped sleeve, is an unusual choice for a head shot, since the sunburst effect of the sleeve cap commands the eye.Read More ›

Head Shots: Dulcie Cooper

If you’ve never heard of Dulcie Cooper, don’t worry, there’s still time to get familiar: two portraits of her are on display in Head Shots through December 30.Read More ›

Alice Live! on Television

In the 1954 and 1955 seasons, two lavish productions of Alice in Wonderland were premiered on television. In each case, they were developed to attract families to the presenting series and their sponsors. Read More ›

Curating Alice Live!

Guest blogger, Charlie Lovett, Curator of the exhibition, 'Alice Live,' at the New York Public Library for Performing Arts, October 2, 2015 - January 16, 2016, writes about his lifelong passion for Alice and his experience curating the exhibition. Read More ›

Kate Claxton Head Shots: This Week Only

The cartes de visite, cabinet photographs and stereograms of Kate Claxton, an intensely photogenic actress.Read More ›

Contact Strips and Head Shots

The advent of contact sheets was great for photography studios and of course, actors and their agents.Read More ›

Triptych Head Shots

Two unusual examples of triptychs, which combine headshots with character portraits.Read More ›

The Stereograph Headshot

When we started to think about an exhibition on Head Shots based on the Library for the Performing Arts’ collections, we discovered that almost every format in the history of photographic portraits was used as a headshot. Read More ›

Frank Sinatra's "The House I Live In"

The Sinatra: An American Icon exhibition has many wonderful media stations for visitors—songs, excerpts from television specials, films trailers and featurettes, and a juke box. But the one that is garnering the most attention is “The House I Live In,” the RKO short subject that won Sinatra his first Oscar. Read More ›

Sinatra at the Stage Door Canteen

We have received many questions recently about this photo, the secondary key image for the exhibition.Read More ›

"...a half-acre of strings..." Sinatra on the Radio

LPA is hosting public programs about listening to Sinatra on the radio, as thousands of Americans would do every week. Read More ›
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