Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery

The Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery — funded by a generous $2.5 million gift from Ruth and Sid Lapidus matched by The New York Public Library — is the only facility of its kind based in a public research library. The 2014 gift  also included 400 rare items of printed material  books and documents continue to be added to the collection. Today, the collection include over 700 items, making the Schomburg Center home to one of the world’s premier collections of slavery material.

The Center's mission is to generate and disseminate scholarly knowledge on the slave trade, slavery, and anti-slavery pertaining to the Atlantic World. The Center supports the work of researchers with long-term and short-term fellowships. Given the centrality of Atlantic slavery to the making of the modern world, the Lapidus fellowships ensure that slavery studies are a cornerstone of the Schomburg Center’s broader research community and provide a counterbalance to the contemporary direction of scholarship in African American and African Diaspora studies.

To raise awareness and historical literacy, the Lapidus Center engages the public with a variety of programs, an annual nonfiction prize, exhibitions, conferences, and partnerships with local, national, and international institutions.

 

LAPIDUS CENTER ANNOUNCES 2022-23 FELLOWS

Congratulations to Edward Ball (Independent Scholar and Historian), Arielle X. Alterwaite (Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of History, University of Pennsylvania), and Dr. David Luis-Brown (Associate Professor of Cultural Studies and English, Claremont Graduate University). The three are part of the 2022-23 class of Lapidus Center fellows. Using the Schomburg Center’s extensive collections, each will examine slavery across the Atlantic world.

DR. VINCENT BROWN WINS 2021 HARRIET TUBMAN PRIZE

Headshot of Dr. Vincent Brown. He is on the left side of the image and there is a white/grey background behind him. Book cover of Tacky’s Revolt, which featured an illustration of enslaved people fighting British officers. The Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is pleased to announce that Dr. Vincent Brown is the winner of the 2021 Harriet Tubman Prize for his book Tacky’s Revolt: The Story of an Atlantic Slave War. The Harriet Tubman Prize awards $7,500 to the best nonfiction book published in the United States on the slave trade, slavery, and anti-slavery in the Atlantic World. 

Dr. Brown is the Charles Warren Professor of American History and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University.  (Photo of Dr. Brown is by Stephanie Mitchell)

ONLINE APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE FOR 2022-23 LAPIDUS CENTER FELLOWS

A bookshelf filled with books If you are a post-doctoral scholar who is studying the slave trade, slavery, and anti-slavery in the Atlantic World, consider applying to the short and long-term fellowships at the Lapidus Center located at the Schomburg Center. Fellows receive access to our collections, opportunities to disseminate their work across Library channels, and monetary support. The deadline is Monday, January 10, 2022.

 

 

PANDEMIC LEGACIES: HEALTH, HEALING, AND MEDICINE IN THE AGE OF SLAVERY AND BEYOND

 Health, Healing, and Medicine in the Age of Slavery and Beyond, Schomburg Center logo at the bottom of the images and the plant with leaves on the right side. Did you miss our talk Reading Slavery through the Archives of Healing? Want to watch our conversation Slavery, Race, and Medicine in Cuba again? Explore the Schomburg Center's Livestream channel to see every panel discussion from our Pandemic Legacies conference.

Panelists included scholars Deirdre Cooper Owens, Elise A. Mitchell, and Rana A. Hogarth. 

 

 

FINALISTS ANNOUNCED FOR 2021 HARRIET TUBMAN PRIZE

Headshots of three finalists for the Harriet Tubman Book Prize awarded by the Lapidus Center. Erika Edwards standing in front of a wooded area, Vincent Brown against a black background, and Christine Walker against an outdoor background.
Erika Edwards , Vincent Brown, and Christine Walker are finalists for the 2021 Harriet Tubman Prize.

Congratulations to the finalists for this year’s Harriet Tubman Prize: Erika Denise Edwards, associate professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Vincent Brown, professor of history at Harvard University; and Christine Walker, assistant professor of history at Yale-NUS College in Singapore.

The prize, awarded annually by the Lapidus Center for the Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery at the Schomburg Center, will go to one of the following books: Edwards's Hiding in Plain Sight: Black Women, the Law, and the Making of a White Argentine Republic; Brown’s Tacky’s Revolt: The Story of an Atlantic Slave War; or Walker’s Jamaica Ladies: Female Slaveholders and the Creation of Britain's Atlantic Empire. These titles were considered by the judges to be the best nonfiction books published in the U.S. on the slave trade, slavery, and anti-slavery in the Atlantic World in the last year. The winner will be announced in November. 

EXPLORE READING LIST CREATED BY LAPIDUS CENTER AND PENGUIN CLASSICS

Book covers of The Portable Nineteenth Century African American Women Writers, Beloved, and From Slave Cabins to the White House

Discover classic and contemporary novels, poetry, and nonfiction works curated by the Lapidus Center and Penguin Classics on slavery and memory in the U.S. Explore their recommended reading list.

 

 

 

 

LAPIDUS CENTER CURATOR RELEASES TWO NEW BOOKS

 Passages

Through a partnership with Penguin Classics, Dr. Michelle Commander, associate director and curator of the Lapidus Center, edited the anthology Unsung: Unheralded Narratives of American Slavery & Abolition, plus developed a reading list with the publisher. Additionally, she wrote Avidly Reads: Passages, which discusses modes of transportation such as the slave ship, train, automobile, and bus as a way to trace the journeys of her ancestors in her hometown in South Carolina. Read the full story.