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About Mid-Manhattan Library at 42nd Street

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Mid-Manhattan Library offers The New York Public Library’s largest circulating collections in the heart of Midtown, including a broad selection of popular books, older and classic fiction, DVDs, CDs, magazines and newspapers, and online databases. It also provides a large selection of books and DVDs in many languages and a dedicated collection for teens. While Mid-Manhattan Library’s permanent location on Fifth Avenue is currently closed for renovation, the branch’s interim location—called Mid-Manhattan at 42nd Street—is open and accessible to patrons via the 42nd Street entrance of the Schwarzman Building.

Collections

Mid-Manhattan Library is one of the busiest circulating libraries in the country. Materials are geared toward students and adults, with a broad selection of popular books, older and classic fiction, DVDs, CDs, magazines and newspapers, and online databases. There is a large selection of books and DVDs in many languages, with a dedicated collection for teens.

The nonfiction collection covers a full range of subjects, including applied art and art history, consumer health, cookbooks, education, history, language, literature, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, sociology, travel.

Mid-Manhattan Library’s full collection is housed onsite at the branch’s interim location on the ground floor of the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building. Mid-Manhattan’s most current and frequently used books are available for browsing, while the rest of the collection is held in a non-public area and available for quick retrieval by staff. Materials can be requested in advance at nypl.org or at various service points throughout the interim location.

Please note: The Picture Collection, formerly housed at Mid-Manhattan Library, has relocated to the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, Room 100.

For Children’s collections, please visit the Children’s Center at 42nd Street.

Public Computers

Mid-Manhattan Library at 42nd Street provides free access to a number of public computers and laptops for onsite use. Use of desktop computers is limited to one 15- or 45-minute session per day with sign-up available in person or online.

Please note: Select Mid-Manhattan Library computer trainings and classes have relocated to the Science, Industry & Business Library. Find classes for all locations online at nypl.org/techconnect.

Programs

Mid-Manhattan Library at 42nd Street offers a variety of free evening and weekend public programs. Search our online calendar of events at this branch or find flyers for the latest programs here.

Proctoring

Mid-Manhattan Library at 42nd Street offers free exam proctoring services. All students must complete a Library Proctoring Form if they wish to schedule service with us. This form can be submitted in person at the library or by emailing mmlproctor@nypl.org. Due to the large number of requests, advance notice is required if you wish to schedule your test with us. Exams can be scheduled on Mondays and Wednesday between 1PM and 5PM .

Proctoring services guidelines for Mid-Manhattan Library and contact information can be found here.

A list of other New York City proctoring locations can be found here.

Community District Information

For more information about your Community District, including census data, community board information, local schools and other resources, see here.

NYPL Branch Hours

Information on branch hours throughout Manhattan, Staten Island, and the Bronx can be found here.

About the Mid-Manhattan Library Renovation

Mid-Manhattan Library has long been NYPL’s largest and busiest circulating library, with more than 1.7 million visits a year and an annual circulation of 2 million items. In August 2017, the permanent location of this vital but aging hub closed for a major interior renovation that will transform it into the state-of-the-art library that New Yorkers need and deserve. The permanent location is expected to reopen in early 2020.

For more information on the renovation, visit nypl.org/midtown.