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Best of the Web: History & Social Sciences » Psychology » Literature

  • Online resource useful for study of 17th century literature and gender studies.
  • Various version of the fables of Aesop in Greek, Latin, and English.
  • A digital collection of some 52 published works by 19th-century black women writers. Part of the Digital Schomburg, this collection provides access to the thought, perspectives and creative abilities of black women as captured in books and pamphlets published prior ro 1920. A selection of published works of fiction, poetry, biography and autobiography, and essays. Keyword searching within each work or throughout the collection. Works featured include Phillis Weatly, Poems the Narrative of Sojourner Truth and Harriet A. Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.
  • Provides an annual list of fiction and non-fiction titles which "celebrate the authors, illustrators, editors, and publishers who create and produce feminist books for young readers." Archived from 2002.
  • General introduction to Grecian history and culture from the archaic period into the Hellenistic.
  • A course handbook for students of ancient rhetoric.
  • Site dedicated to the study of ancient Greek poetry from the Epics to Anacreontics.
  • Website based on an ambitious exhibition at the Golda Meir library of published texts with images and commentary. Includes links to other authors.
  • An annotated bibliography of books written for girls which reflect the roles considered proper at the time. Titles are drawn from the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture. With few exceptions, titles are listed chronologically within the various subject headings. at Duke University.
  • An "online scholarly archive consisting of E-text editions of poetry by British and Irish women written (not necessarily published) between 1789 (the onset of the French Revolution) and 1832 (the passage of the Reform Act), a period traditionally known in English literary history as the Romantic period." Poets include Lucy Aikin, Anna Letitia Aikin Barbauld, Felicia Dorothea Brown Hemans, Mary Robinson, and Charlotte Turner Smith. From the Shields Library, University of California.
  • Timely reviews of scholarly work in the field of classical studies (including archaeology). Archived from 1990 to the present.
  • "Since 1995 this site has been the place to find translations of the poetry of Gaius Valerius Catullus. Many many contributors have created a collection containing over 540 versions of Catullus poems in 25 different languages."
  • Works by women writers and an extensive listing of links to biographical and bibliographical information. Browse by author, century, country, or ethnicity.
  • "The Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents was established in 1995 under the auspices of Oxford University's Faculty of Literae Humaniores to provide a focus for the study of ancient documents within Oxford. . . . The Centre provides a home for Oxford University's epigraphical archive, which includes one of the largest collections of squeezes (paper impressions) of Greek inscriptions in the world, together with the Haverfield archive of Roman inscriptions from Britain, and a substantial photographic collection.
  • "The Great House and landscape at Chawton which Jane Austen knew well are being restored by a British educational charity, Chawton House Library, to be the future home of the Centre for the Study of Early English Womens Writing (1600-1830) and a unique collection of rare books currently housed in the USA. . . the Collection comprises several literary manuscripts and over 6,200 printed books, published between 1600 and 1830. . . . The Collection is particularly strong in fiction by women from around 1740, an area which attracts considerable international scholarly interest.
  • Library of Congress site offering an annotated list of reference websites.
  • Homepage of the sub-faculties of Classical Languages and Literature and Ancient History at the University of Oxford.
  • University of Florida site collects links related to Classics. Includes Local Resources, Subject Guides/Indices, Databases, Bibliographies, Directories/Associations, Etexts, journals and more.
  • This site provides "over 900 pages of news,information, games and controversy about the life, literature, art and archaeology of the ancient world of Greece & Rome."
  • Links to a broad range of resources including Greek and Latin Languages, Greek and Latin authors, Maps and sites of the Ancient World, Classics E-Journals, Medieval Latin Language and Culture, Classics Publishers, Classics Associations, and more.
  • "The Corpus Scriptorum Latinorum (CSL) is a collaborative project among scholars from a variety of disciplines with the main purpose of creating a digital library of Latin literature, spanning from the earliest epigraphic remains to the Neo-Latinists of the eighteenth century. Toward this end, we maintain an up-to-date catalogue of all Latin texts that are currently available online, making CSL a single, centralized resource for locating Latin literature on the internet."
  • Didaskalia "is a web-site and journal dedicated to the study of ancient Greek and Roman theatre in performance, and to the legacy of ancient theatre." Issues beginning with volume 1 number 1, March 1994, are available, though the index and search mechanisms are under construction.
  • A well-designed website and electronic journal on Greek and Roman drama, dance, and music. The website provides historical background (including descriptions of staging and plans of Greek & Roman theatres), while the journal explores contemporary performance of classical works.
  • Interdisciplinary research tool for the study of women and gender in the ancient world.
  • Focus is on women and issues of gender among the Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, and other ancient cultures.
  • "A moderated E-journal, devoted to women writers, beginning in the 19th century, who wrote domestic fiction."
  • Sponsored by the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, this magazine is accessible from volume 1, June 1993. There are tables of contents to the various issues, but no search mechanism. Each issue contains 1 to 3 articles, book reviews and a forum for scholars in the field.
  • This site features "more than 350 literary works composed in the Sumerian language in ancient Mesopotamia (modern Iraq) during the late third and early second millennia BCE. The corpus comprises Sumerian texts in transliteration, English prose translations and bibliographical information for each composition. The transliterations and the translations can be searched, browsed and read online using the tools of the website." Based at the University of Oxford.
  • A collection of edited and unedited texts by women writing in English from the seventeenth to the ninteenth century. Prose, poetry, and drama are represented. Many texts deal with women, feminist issues, and the question of women's rights.
  • "Gender Inn is a searchable database providing access to over 8,400 records pertaining to feminist theory, feminist literary criticism and gender studies focusing on English and American literature."
  • This website provides "a completely interactive digital library book".
  • Site provides recordings of extracts from ancient Greek and Latin texts. This recital site was created for (and by) the classics teaching staff at Harvard to help students grasp the vital performative aspect of ancient literature. Selections were chosen because of their inclusion in various Harvard introductory-level language courses, as an aid to pronunciation and meter."
  • Select from a list of over 400 works of classical literature, mainly Greco-Roman (some Chinese and Persian), all in English translation.Search by work and author, as well as from the entire archive.
  • University of Kentucky site offers links to many valuable resources--among them, Diotima, a website devoted to the study of women in the ancient world.
  • A valuable resource for texts, bibliographies, pedagogical resources, organizations and databases devoted to medievalia.
  • Provides "links to relevant on-line resources for individual Latin and Greek authors. Most of the authors belong to the Greek and Roman classical antiquity, but some Christian, medieval and Neo-Latin writers are included as well."
  • Offers access to the Library's resources in the field [holdings, exhibits, etc.] as well as links to other useful sites.
  • Online magazine on early modernism, dealing especially with women in Paris, 1900-1940.
  • Online catalog of the Loeb Classical Library, which publishes the work of classical Greek and Latin authors. Browse the listings by author, subject, or series number.
  • A collection of some of the most important literary works of Classical and Medieval civilization. Searchable and browsable.
  • This site provides "links that will take you to passages from over 125 women writers. The entries are on women who produced a substantial amount of work before 1700, some or all of which has been translated into modern English. Each entry will tell you about the print sources from which the translated passages are taken it will also tell you of useful secondary sources and Internet sites, when those are available."
  • Provides links to full-text, commentaries, and other resources.
  • "The Princeton/Stanford Working Papers in Classics is a collaborative project of the Classics Department of Princeton University and the Classics Department of Stanford University. Its purpose is to make the results of current research undertaken by members of Princeton and Stanford Universities in the field of classics available in advance of final publication."
  • Guide (in German) to many European Classics websites.
  • Links to texts, commentaries, and other resources.
  • Online resources for teaching American Women's literature through audio dramatizations. Registration (free) required for lesson plans and teaching materials.
  • Articles and videos from BBC News on the idea of happiness.
  • Contains 400 classical Greek and Latin texts with commentary.
  • A rapidly expanding Digital Library from Tufts with a plentiful collection of Greek playtexts and other classical resources. The site also contains full-text versions of Christopher Marlowe's work, an edition of Shakespeare's First Folio, and source material on the history and founding of London. Atlases identify places mentioned in the collection of online texts.
  • Provides links to Vergil scholarship on the web.
  • "Voices From the Gaps is a World Wide Web project that focuses on the lives and works of women writers of color in North America. . . Each author page presents biographical, critical and bibliographical information about the writer as well as images and quotes pertinent to her life and works. Each page includes, in addition, links to other resources on the World Wide Web which contain significant information about that writer."
  • An annual sponsered by the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and The National Council of Teachers of English, accessible from volume 1, Fall 1992.
  • The books and letters in this online exhibition present a cross section of writing by English women in the nineteenth century.
  • Chronicles classic lesbian pulp fiction of the 1950s and early 1960s. From the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.
  • Directory of texts and related scholarship.
  • "The Brown University Women Writers Project is a long-term research project devoted to early modern women's writing and electronic text encoding. Our goal is to bring texts by pre-Victorian women writers out of the archive and make them accessible to a wide audience of teachers, students, scholars, and the general reader."
  • An e-journal featuring critical articles, book reviews, interviews, poetry and fiction, and link collections.
  • Includes travel diaries, journals, and other publications. Includes women travellers from and to the United States, as well as selected American and European women travellers to non-Western areas. Searchable.

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