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Best of the Web: History & Social Sciences » Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Resources

  • New stories and opinion pieces on gay rights in the U.K., from Guardian Unlimited.
  • The online edition of a Columbia University Libraries exhibition held from May 25 to September 17, 1994 in conjunction with the international celebration of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Stonewall Riots.
  • The online edition of the Columbia University Libraries exhibition on gay and lesbian history and culture, held in 1994 in conjunction with the celebration of the 25th anniversary of the "Stonewall Riots" in New York City.
  • Established in 1984, this educational resource center's site offers information on "cultural and educational programming, video, audio, and text library holdings, educational resources, information and referral, harassment and discrimination responses, advocacy, training and support, and community outreach."
  • Links to courses around the U.S. From QueerTheory.com.
  • "Commercial Closet Association works to lessen discrimination of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community by encouraging corporations and ad agencies to improve GLBT portrayals in the persuasive medium of mainstream advertising. The nonprofit project brings together journalistic reporting, critiques, visitor reviews, live video lectures, guidelines and resources. The project manages the world's only LGBT ad archive, with 1,700 adverts spanning 33 countries and 85 years."
  • NLGJA "an organization of journalists, online media professionals, and students that works from within the journalism industry to foster fair and accurate coverage of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues. NLGJA opposes workplace bias against all minorities and provides professional development for its members."
  • Bibliographies from one of the first transgendered studies courses -- held at Brown University (1998).
  • Chronicles classic lesbian pulp fiction of the 1950s and early 1960s. From the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

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