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  • USAID is an independent federal government agency that receives overall foreign policy guidance from the Secretary of State. It supports long-term and equitable economic growth and advances U.S. foreign policy objectives by supporting:

    • economic growth, agriculture and trade;
    • global health; and,
    • democracy, conflict prevention and humanitarian assistance.
  • BLS statistical profiles of 12 industry supersectors

  • Statistical reports on domestic industries from the U.S. Census Bureau.

  • Environmental Protection Agency (U.S.) profiles of major industries including brief overview of the industry, description of industrial processesand environmental compliance summary

  • The Export-Import Bank of the United States (Ex-Im Bank) is the official export credit agency of the United States. Ex-Im Bank's mission is to assist in financing the export of U.S. goods and services to international markets.

  • The International Trade Administration (ITA) strengthens the competitiveness of U.S. industry, promotes trade and investment, and ensures fair trade through the rigorous enforcement of our trade laws and agreements.  ITA works to improve the global business environment and helps U.S. organization compete at home and abroad.

  • SICE - the Organization of American States' Foreign Trade Information System - centralizes information on trade policy in the Americas. On the SICE Website, you will find the full texts of trade agreements in force for OAS Member States, new and ongoing trade policy developments, information on national trade-related legislation, links to international, regional and national sources of trade policy information and more! SICE, with more than ten years online, strives to provide OAS member states and other users up-to-date and relevant information.

  • Through a network of 24 regional centers, the New York State Small Business Development Center delivers high quality business counseling and training to New Yorkers who want to start a business or improve the performance of an existing business. Thanks to our partners in the public and private sectors, our services are free of charge.

  • STAT-USA/Internet, a service of the U.S. Department of Commerce, is a single point of access to authoritative business, trade, and economic information from across the Federal Government. Subscription is required for full access (available at the Science, Industry and Business Library).

  • The SBA helps Americans start, build and grow businesses. Through an extensive network of field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations, SBA delivers its services to people throughout the United States, Puerto Rico, the U. S. Virgin Islands and Guam.

  • Business.gov is an official site of the U.S. Small Business Administration which helps small businesses understand their legal requirements and locate government services from federal, state and local agencies.

  • The U.S. Department of Commerce has a broad mandate to advance economic growth and jobs and opportunities for the American people. It has responsibilities in the areas of trade, technology, entrepreneurship, economic development, environmental stewardship and statistical research and analysis. The products and services the department provides touch the lives of Americans and American companies in many ways, including weather forecasts, the decennial census, and patent and trademark protection for inventors and businesses.

  • The state.gov website serves as the State Department's portal of information on U.S. foreign policy and information about the State Department.

  • The Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) works to improve foreign market access for U.S. products, build new markets, improve the competitive position of U.S. agriculture in the global marketplace, and provide food aid and technical assistance to foreign countries.

  • Portal, published by the United States Dept. of Commerce, providing trade and exporting resources. Basics about exporting, NAFTA rules, calendars of trade shows, events and missions. Find trade partners, statistics and market research.
  • The United States International Trade Commission is an independent, quasijudicial Federal agency with broad investigative responsibilities on matters of trade. The agency investigates the effects of dumped and subsidized imports on domestic industries and conducts global safeguard investigations. The Commission also adjudicates cases involving imports that allegedly infringe intellectual property rights.

  • The mission of the U. S. Trade and Development Agency is to promote economic growth in developing and middle income countries, while simultaneously helping American businesses to export their products and services, thereby creating U.S. jobs. In addition, USTDA supports U.S. policy objectives related to development and capacity building activities.

  • The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) is responsible for developing and coordinating U.S. international trade, commodity, and direct investment policy, and overseeing negotiations with other countries. The head of USTR is the U.S. Trade Representative, a Cabinet member who serves as the president’s principal trade advisor, negotiator, and spokesperson on trade issues.

  • U.S. Census Bureau home page. Censuses of Population and Housing, Economic Censuses and many more statistical sources, both current and historical.

  • The World Bank provides low-interest loans, interest-free credits and grants to developing countries for a wide array of purposes that include investments in education, health, public administration, infrastructure, financial and private sector development, agriculture and environmental and natural resource management.

  • The World Trade Organization (WTO) is the only global international organization dealing with the rules of trade between nations. At its heart are the WTO agreements, negotiated and signed by the bulk of the world's trading nations and ratified in their parliaments. The goal is to help producers of goods and services, exporters, and importers conduct their business.

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