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Connecting you with the LGBT collections, programs, and expertise that The New York Public Library has to offer.

Eastern Conference of Homophile Organizations, 1964

Given the dramatic remapping of marriage equality this past week, it is useful to look back to a very different kind of map of LGBT rights drafted 50 years ago from the archives of a pioneering gay rights group whose records are held in the Library’s Manuscripts & Archives Division.Read More ›

Undetectable Flash Collective

In order to foster a community conversation about HIV and AIDS in dialogue with the Library’s major archives on the history of the AIDS crisis, The New York Public Library is hosting a project to create site-specific installations in four library branches—across the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island—that explore the ways that HIV and AIDS are currently affecting these local New York City communities.Read More ›

"Where Were You During the Christopher Street Riots?"

Founded in 1950, the Mattachines took their name from a French Renaissance-era group of masked peasants who performed skits during the Feast of Fools – often ones that poked fun at or protested their treatment at the hands of the local nobility. Along with the Daughters of Bilitis, a lesbian social and political group founded in San Francisco in 1955, they advocated a kind of radical normality in the face of the overwhelming consensus that homosexuals were deviant, pathological, and diseased. Looking at pictures of them now is like looking at gay activists by way of Leave It to Beaver. Yet Read More ›

Booktalking "Money Boy" by Paul Yee

No money, no home, no place to stay, no idea of how to support yourself. Read More ›

A Prophecy Before Our Time: The Gay Men’s Health Project Clinic Opens in 1972: Controversies and Legacies

Guest post Perry Brass.Read More ›

Booktalking "Silhouette of a Sparrow" by Molly Beth Griffin

Sixteen-year-old Garnet Richardson finds a breath of fresh area in her summer visit to Excelsior, Minnesota in 1926 to live in a hotel with Mrs. Harrington and her daughter Hannah. She is relieved to escape the problems of home, and a little bit scared to enter into the world of the intriguing and beautiful flapper, 17-year-old Isabella. She is excited to start her life as a career woman as a hat shop girl with Miss Maples. Garnet and Isabella share a passion with each other that is definitely not accepted at that time and place.Read More ›

Do You Snore at Night? Are You HIV+? Am I Going to Jail?

The politics around disclosure are complicated and they are not getting any easier.Read More ›

WHY WE FIGHT: HIV and AIDS in New York City Neighborhoods - Call for Artists, Writers, and Activists

Opportunity to study and collaborate with artist, writer, and activist Avram Finkelstein.Read More ›

The Government Has Blood on Its Hands [One AIDS Death Every Half Hour]

Guest post by Avram Finkelstein.

While we prefer to think of art as a reflection of our culture that mirrors our higher selves—and it frequently is—art can also serve as a dividing line.

Without access to the education needed to pry open the class codes woven into the cannon of Western European art, it can be impenetrable. And without the economic mobility that allows us to visit the great galleries of the world, or the leisure time to go to a museum just a few train stops away, art can easily exceed our 

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A Prophecy Before Our Time: The Gay Men’s Health Project Clinic Opens in 1972, Part Two: A Wasted Opportunity

Guest post by Perry Brass.

Lenny Ebreo, Marc Rabinowitz, and I were thrilled about the forum that took place at Washington Square Methodist Church in 1972. Because of the forum, Lenny now had some connection with the New York City Department of Public Health, which after John Lindsey's administration had been re-organized around local community health centers. He began to fixate on the idea of community health. If we could get our community healthy, in mind and body, it would genuinely come together. He revealed a bombshell idea: we'd open our own gay health clinic in the 

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The Silence=Death Poster

Guest post by Avram Finkelstein.

As a founding member of the political collective that produced the image most closely associated with AIDS activism, Silence=Death, I'm frequently asked to speak about this poster. Over the decades people have thanked me for it, telling me the poster was the rallying cry that drew them to political activism.

I have a slightly different take on that. In essence and intention, the political poster is a public thing. It comes to life in the public sphere, and is academic outside of it. 

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A Prophecy Before Our Time: The Gay Men’s Health Project Clinic Opens in 1972

A guest post by Perry Brass.

Sometimes it's difficult to realize looking back at an activity how far ahead it was. But for the three founders—Leonard Ebreo, Marc Rabinowitz, and myself—of the Gay Men's Health Project Clinic, the first clinic for gay men on the East Coast, opening in 1972 in an unfinished concrete basement at 247 West Eleventh Street in Greenwich Village—this wasn't difficult. We just had no idea how far reaching the term "gay men's health" would become. But we knew the clinic was vitally 

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Why We Fight: The E-Resources

While the Library's collections related to HIV and AIDS in both the Manuscripts Division and the General Research Division are especially rich, the Library also provides access to electronic resources that supplement the print holdings.Read More ›

A Corresponding List for NYPL’s Exhibit Why We Fight: Remembering AIDS Activism

The early days of the AIDS epidemic were marked by prejudice, ignorance, and political strife—but the grassroots work of pioneering activists changed the conversation, sparking the fight that generated real change, and eventually, strong action from national and international leaders.

Why We Fight: Remembering AIDS Activism is a powerful exhibition presented by The New York Public Library that examines the impact and significance of early AIDS activists in the 1980s and 1990s. 

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VD is No Camp

V.D. is no camp, Mattachine Society of New YorkOne of my favorite objects in the exhibition isn't about AIDS at all. It's a small brochure by the Mattachine Society of New York. Titled "VD is No Camp," the small brochure tries to speak in a funny direct way from one gay man to another about the risks of love and desire. I included it in the show because it points to something very 

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Jack Baker and James McConnell

Given yesterday's historic Supreme Court decision overturning the Defense of Marriage Act, it's good to take a moment to look back at the struggles for marriage equality.

In many current debates about the direction of LGBT political struggles, marriage equality has been portrayed as a conservative move after the radicalism of 1970s Gay Liberation and later Queer politics. However, a closer look reveals that LGBT activists have been deeply concerned over the right to marry since the start of modern gay 

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Pic Pick (LGBTQ Edition): King & King by Linda de Haan and Stern Nijland

King & King By Linda de Haan and Stern Nijland Recommended for Ages 6 and Up

How many times has your parent told you "That's it, I've had ENOUGH!"? Nevermind, I am sure everyone reading this blog is well behaved. Ok, well it has happened to me, I remember plenty of instances when my mom had had "enough." In this book, the Queen mother has had ENOUGH too!

King & King tells the fairy tale of a Queen who is ready to retire from ruling the kingdom. But to 

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LGBT Special Libraries and Museums

I cataloged a couple of gay libraries in Dublin, Ireland and Albany, NY, and there has been much in the news media lately about LGBT rights since New York State began recognizing gay and lesbian marriages in 2011. I think it is awesome and terrific that people are now able to legally marry who they love regardless of the gender of the spouses. Below are some LGBT libraries and museums that I found.

Special Libraries

from the

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LGBTQ Books for All Ages

To commemorate the the Stonewall riots, which occurred at the end of June 1969, this month has been proclaimed as LGBT Pride Month. To celebrate, I compiled some lists of LGBTQ-themed books. Happy Pride Month everyone!

Adult Fiction

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson

Stone Butch Blues by Leslie 

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Booktalking "Every Day" by David Levithan

Tired of living with the same people every day? What about being a drifter who gets to experience life in different people's bodies every single day? You can never be in the same person's body for more than one day. Of course, identical twins are a different story.

No consequences for your behavior the next day. Luckily, the book's main character is the responsible 

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