Click to search the Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library Skip Navigation

Book Fund

Biblio File

Share

Your one-stop shop for blog posts across the Library about books, reading and literature.

December Reader's Den: Caleb Carr's The Alienist, Part II

New York City in 1896 was not a hospitable place to live if you were not one of means. Part II of The Alienist opens with another gruesome murder of a boy prostitute, this time at Castle Clinton during its conversion to house the New York City Aquarium. 

As the team fleshes out the killer's profile, John Moore begins to investigate the worst of New York's sex industry, attempting to find connections between past and possible future victims. Moore is, in many ways, the opposite of 

... Read More ›

Great Graphic Novels for Kids 2013

Late last year, I featured some of my favorite graphic novels aimed at children 12 and under from the New York Public Library's collection. The list proved so popular I even made a sequel. Many people have asked me for a list of updated titles, so I have featured five of my new favorite comic titles that were published this year. A few of these selections are even featured in the

... Read More ›

December Reader's Den: Caleb Carr's The Alienist, Part I

Last week we did a quick introduction and description for The Alienist, a mystery set in late-19th century New York City at the dawning of forensic pathology. Child prostitution, gruesome at any time, becomes even more grisly; a serial killer hunts the boys plying this trade in Teddy Roosevelt's New York, removing their eyes as part of the killings. Part I of the novel sees the titular alienist, Dr. Laszlo Kreizler, assemble an 

... Read More ›

December Reader's Den: An Introduction to Caleb Carr's The Alienist

"An ungodly pummeling on the door of my grandmother's house at 19 Washington Square North brought first the maid and then my grandmother herself to the doorways of their bedrooms at two o'clock on the morning of March 3, 1896."

The gruesome case at the heart of Caleb Carr's The Alienist begins at this ungodly hour in an ungodly time of New York City's history, the turn of the 20th century, that brutal period when Teddy Roosevelt served as New York City Police Commissioner. This 

... Read More ›

Edith Wharton, A Writing Life: Marriage

In a writer's life, nothing is ever wasted. Every wrinkle in the fabric of experience can be transformed into fictional material. Although there is nothing directly autobiographical in the novels and stories of American novelist Edith Wharton (born Edith Jones), they reflect very distinctly both the shape of her life and the movements of her thought. In my previous post about her childhood, I left off with an unresolved question, one which would have been deeply troubling to Lucretia Jones, Edith's 

... Read More ›

November Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

Is Detroit City really the place to be? What happens in a typical day at a busy NYC hospital? How does a traveler lose himself all over the globe? Is it possible for the government to achieve full employment in 

... Read More ›

Author Interview with Hollis Seamon

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Author Hollis Seamon recently wrote an amazing young adult novel, Somebody Up There Hates You, featuring two teenagers living in hospice care while suffering from terminal cancer. Despite the grim subject matter, I can honestly say that this was one of the more heartful and thoughtful books I've read this year. Hollis was kind enough to answer a few 

... Read More ›

Fight for Your Right to Read: Banned Books Week 2013

From 2000 to 2009, 8 out of the top 10 books on "The Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books" were specifically written for teens or children. In fact out of that list of 100, 67 were books for teens or children. Titles such as the Harry Potter series (#1), the

... Read More ›

Great Book Web Sites

I was inspired to write this blog from my terrific experience with booktv.org. I very much enjoy watching and listening to authors describe their research and conclusions that they have metamorphosed into works of literature.

BookTV is featured on CSPAN2 (Channel 66 in my neighborhood) on weekends, if you have cable TV. It features authors of nonfiction works being interviewed about their books. Following the interview, the floor is opened up to audience questions. One weekend, I was delighted to discover that they have a web site. It got me to thinking about what 

... Read More ›

Inspired by Jack Finney's Time and Again: A Gilded Age Reading List from 1882 New York

"The great demand is for fiction!"

"Among all classes of people, do you think?"

"Yes, sir."

"Then you mean to say," persisted the reporter, "that the principal portion of the reading public of New York is composed of novel readers."

"That is it exactly, so far as library patrons are concerned," replied the librarian.

—The New York Times, January 22, 1882

Welcome back to the Reader's Den. I hope you enjoyed reading

... Read More ›

A List of Lists: August 2013

Need a recommendation? Ask usLibrarians across the country have voted on their most-anticipated books coming out in the month of September. They are:

    Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell How the Light Gets In: A Chief Inspector 
... Read More ›

The Wonder Years: Music and References from Season One

What would you do if I sang out of tune? Would you stand up and walk out on me?

I don't know about you, but certain songs are for me forever associated with certain movies and television shows.

What do you think of when you hear Roy Orbison's "In Dreams"? How about when you hear Stealers Wheel's "Stuck in the Middle With 

... Read More ›

Author Interview with Corina Vacco

Every so often, a new author comes along that demands a reader's attention. Corina Vacco, a first time novelist living in Berkeley, California, has accomplished such a feat. Inspired by real life events, she has set her debut novel in an extremely polluted western New York surbub. The story follows the lives of several teenagers over the course of their summer before high school. As the boys plot to sabotage and expose the chemical conglomerate responsible for their town's 

... Read More ›

August Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

What is it like to be a convicted murderer just released from prison? What company was the Apple of the 1960s and 70s? Can you forage for edible plants in New York City? How much do you know about life in

... Read More ›

Brain Pickings @ the NYPL

I'm sure my boss wouldn't want to know how often I check Brain Pickings's 20+ daily Twitter posts but I never imagined I would actually meet Maria Popova, the "curator of interestingness." Lucky for me she's a fan of the NYPL and was more than willing to collaborate with the Library Shop on a series of "best of" lists. And so four lists were born: Wisdom on the Written Word, Furry Friends, I <3 NY, and 

... Read More ›

My Book Expo America Experience

On Thursday, May 30, 2013, I was lucky enough to take a trip to the annual Book Expo America. This year, it was held at the Jacob Javits Convention Center. It will be in New York City for the next two years; after that, I believe that it will be in Chicago.

I fell in love with Book Expo America when I first attended the conference in 2012 at the suggestion of my supervisor. This event is different than most of the other conferences in the New York City area that I have attended, which 

... Read More ›

July Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

Dangers of the 'foodopoly'... secrets of the original West Village... how Manhattan became capital of the world... a survey of time in love, war, crime, art, money and media... the spectrum of

... Read More ›

Confessions of an Anglophile

I get asked a lot about my Union Jack tattoo. Mainly, "why?" My answer? "Why not? I just like all things British and Scottish, okay? Geesh. Leave me alone!" But the real answer is bit more complicated. Those stories, those places just always captured my imagination. Growing up in Northern Idaho anyplace outside of my corner of North America was exotic in my book. Or perhaps I should just give the simplest answer, which is, "I blame my parents."

kucinski on flickrMy father was 

... Read More ›

The Annotated Superman: A Top 10 List

Happy Birthday, Superman! This past April marked the 75th Anniversary of the hero. To celebrate that, and in anticipation of Zack Snyder's upcoming film Man of Steel, we have put together a list of some popular Superman tales at the New York Public Library. Be sure to also check out our individual feature of Superman: Earth One and similar lists featuring Batman and The X-Men. Also, please comment below with your favorite Superman story. We want to know what your favorites are, too.Read More ›

June Author @ the Library Programs at Mid-Manhattan

Should we worry about a Medicare Meltdown? Is a newly identified autoimmune disease responsible for instances of demonic possession recorded in the past? What is the Secret History of Coffee, Coca & Cola? How can we best care for

... Read More ›
Previous Page 3 of 19 Next

Chat with a librarian now