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The New York Public Library strives for total accessibility, no matter what our differences may be. Join us as we move down the path toward that goal.

CART, or Real-Time Captioning, at the NYPL

Perhaps you have heard of real-time captioning, or CART (Communication Access Realtime Transcription), as it is often called. This is the provision of captions to accompany a presentation or performance in real time. The captions are generally projected onto a screen, where some or all of the audience can read them. CART can potentially enhance experience for several groups of people:

those who became deaf after becoming proficient in English (or another language), i.e., the post-lingually deaf; those with mild to moderate hearing loss, who want to follow along with what ... Read More ›

World Sight Day at NYPL

Lions International, working with other organizations that fight blindness, commemorated the first World Sight Day in 1998. Since then, it has been observed throughout the world on the second Thursday of each year; the World Health Organization and the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness are the chief coordinating agencies at present. Communities and organizations have initiated activities to support the main 

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Andrew Heiskell Library's Links We Loved in September

The following links caught our attention this past month. Plus, we've got a couple of announcements about new services.

Haptic Device Gives Blind a Helping Hand. Promising new technology to help people without sight to navigate.

Improved Accessibility for Google Calendars.

Dolly Parton's Imagination 

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My Library: Sharon

I had heard a bit about Sharon Anyimi; but I didn't know much. I knew she visited Baychester Library in Co-Op City — a lot — and was always reading books with the help of the Closed-Captioned Television system (CCTV), also known as the video magnifier, located in the Library. I knew she was a "people person" with a friendly word for all. I decided to wend my way to the northeast Bronx and meet this intriguing library user for 

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Andrew Heiskell Library's Best of Summer Links

We can't believe the summer is nearly over. Aside from the distractions of a minor earthquake and a hurricane (though Irene had been downgraded to a tropical storm by the time she hit New York City), we served up a number of links on our Facebook and Twitter pages that you might find interesting.

The New York City Mayor's Office is hosting a free exhibition Beep Baseball game between the L.I. Bombers and WFAN 660 sports radio on Saturday, September 24 at 3:30 p.m. at 

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Fotis Flevotomos displays Drawings and Watercolors for Mid-Manhattan Library's Low Vision and Blindness Resource Day

Shortly after landing in New York City from Greece, Fotis Flevotomos walked into Mid-Manhattan Library on June 11, 2011. As Brigid Cahalan, The New York Public Library's Outreach Coordinator, was showing him the space in the Corner Room where his art would adorn the shelves from June 11 through June 23, I was staffing the Popular Library Desk and thought that he must have been jet-lagged — if he was, that didn't stop him from installing all of his pieces that day. Flevotomos's art was on display as part of the Low Vision and Blindness Resource Day.

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Interesting Lives: The Latest Biographies and Memoirs at Andrew Heiskell Library

a sampling of digital booksA good biography is like a good novel. It can transport you to a different place and a different time, and inspire the imagination. But what has always appealed to me about biographies is that they could put me into someone else's head, letting me vicariously live a life more interesting than my own. Growing up, I read mostly fiction, especially science fiction and mysteries, which took me to exotic places both real and imaginary. But when teachers insisted we students be well-rounded readers, the non-fiction books I turned to were on the biography shelves in my 

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Andrew Heiskell Library: Art Exhibition and Timely Links

Reading a Braille DescriptionCreating visual art is not the first thing most people consider when thinking of people who are blind or who have visual difficulties, but there are many such artists and photographers who challenge that perception every day. The Andrew Heiskell Library was pleased to host an exhibition of artwork by students who have visual impairments, running from June 14 through June 18.

A reception, complete with refreshments, was well attended on opening night, and the exhibition drew a steady stream of visitors through the week. The photograph 

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Andrew Heiskell Library Best of May

We liked the following links this past month:

The Iowa Department for the Blind's blog, Blind Living, focusing on cooking, crafts, gardening, and more for people who are blind or have visual difficulties.

Books Open for Visually Impaired: Students in Pennsylvania team with the Carnegie Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped to record Talking Books.

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From Book to TV: Television's Literary Inspirations

Creators of TV shows get their inspiration from many places, but lately they seem to be turning more and more often to books for their source material. And with quality programs doing justice to the books that inspired them, it's a welcome trend, especially if it leads fans of the shows who have never read the books to seek them out. Here are some to get you started.

In the following booklists, RC indicates Recorded Cassette, DB indicates Digital Book, and BR indicates Braille. NYPL indicates a book or video available in branches of The New York Public 

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Andrew Heiskell Library April Links We Loved

Our links from April.

Free touch tour of the Glenn Ligon: AMERICA exhibit at the Whitney Museum on Friday, May 6 at 11:00AM. Call 212-570-7789 to RSVP.

How Bind People See the Internet is a nice overview.

American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) and the National Association for Parents of 

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Dystopias in Fiction

A Clockwork Orange"War is Peace." "Freedom is Slavery." "Ignorance is Strength." These tenets of doublethink are from George Orwell's classic dystopian novel 1984. It's Dystopia Week at Tor.com, which provides an excellent incentive to look at one of my favorite genres, or subgenres: Dystopian Fiction!

From failed attempts at perfect societies to aftermaths of natural and unnatural disasters, dystopian fiction has a long tradition of examining human 

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Andrew Heiskell Library Links We Loved in March 2011

From inspiring stories to the latest in assistive technology, we've got it all! Here are the links and announcements we posted on Facebook and Twitter for March.

The New York Times covered our Unseen Dance program, presented by the No-See-Ums.

Online survey for people with 

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Dancing in the Dark: Experiencing Dance Without Sight

I must be out of my mind. What the heck am I doing here, on a Saturday afternoon, blindfolded inside a Staten Island library, grasping the shoulders of a total stranger in front of me? This is truly insane.

That’s all I could think of on March 5, when I attended BARK, a performance by dance troupe Dana Salisbury and the No-See-Ums. They perform what they call “unseen dance” — original dances experienced through senses other than sight. It sounded very quirky and cool, so I decided to 

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Observing Deaf History Month

NYPL Digital Gallery- Image ID: 1135965- Alphabet for the Deaf and Dumb. - 1. (ca. 1903-1917) (British Sign Language Alphabet)

Did you know? Deaf History Month is celebrated each year from March 13-April 15. It straddles two months to highlight three of the key milestones in deaf history:

March 13, 1988: The Deaf President Now movement succeeds in having I. King Jordan named the first deaf president of Gallaudet University. April 8, 1864: President Abraham Lincoln signs the charter for ... Read More ›

Unseen Dance

photo: Dana Salisbury; used with permissionWith few exceptions (music, sculpture, tactile canvases), the Arts have typically been inaccessible to people who are blind or who have visual difficulties, but the times, as is often said, are a-changing. Dana Salisbury and the No-See-Ums will be presenting BARK! An Unseen Dance, at four New York Public Libraries this month. Based on non-visual perception, this is the first dance form fully accessible to people who are blind or visually impaired.

Choreographed by Dana 

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Andrew Heiskell Library's February Announcements and Links

We've got a grab-bag of links and articles for you this month.

Unseen Dance at the New York Public LibraryDana Salisbury and the No-See-Ums perform BARK, a dance for blindfolded audiences. Audience members experience the dance through their other senses. The group will perform at the Andrew Heiskell Library on Saturday, March 12, 2011 at 2:00 p.m. For Adults Only.

Looking for a more accessible Twitter client?

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A Year of Digital Talking Books

In the summer of 2009, the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped officially went digital. For many months before digital cartridges were introduced, however, digital books were available for downloading from the National Library Service's BARD (Braille and Audio Reading Download) website. At first, the BARD service was only lightly used, but once patrons started to receive their players in mid-2009, BARD downloading began in 

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Andrew Heiskell Library January Links and Announcements

This month's links focus on disability rights, along with some useful services.

The White House Disability Group holds monthly calls to update the public on various issues related to disabilities.

To listen in: Dial-in number: (800) 230-1093 Title: Disability Call (use instead of code) For live captioning (at time of call) go to the event page.

American Association of People with Disabilities

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The Birth of Braille

Most people read with their eyes. They might read a physical book or electronic text. Some people read with their ears, listening to audiobooks or Talking Books from the National Library Service. And some people read with their fingers.

January 4th marks the 202nd anniversary of the birth of Louis Braille, inventor of the raised writing system that bears his name and is still used by blind people to communicate.

Although many forms of raised writing were used before, during, and for a time, after Braille's life, his sytem 

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