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Frankenstein and the Afterlife of Shelley’s Circle, the second edition of NYPL's collections-based app Biblion, shows how the questions we ask ourselves everyday — about technology, prejudice, gender — are all contained in a classic work of literature: Mary Shelley's 200 year old novel Frankenstein.


In Biblion, you'll how the same ideas get remixed over time, and how the classics continue to inspire and inform the world around us. Articles from experts and inspiring thinkers are paired with more than 550 photographs, prints, and maps from the unparalleled collections of The New York Public Library.

Plus, each article is linked to one of more than 750 pages of original source documents including the entire original handwritten draft of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, begun in 1816. We've paired this manuscript with a transcript of the novel's 1831 edition so you can toggle the published transcript over the original draft to see how Shelley changed and developed this classic work over time. 

Biblion: Frankenstein also includes new social reading features that allow you to participate in conversations about big ideas, vote on polls, and create new questions for other readers.

Download the groundbreaking iPad app from The New York Public Library, launching June 7, 2012

Or, browse the edition online

Backstage at LIVE from the NYPL, with The Daily Beast

Go Backstage at LIVE from the NYPL... with The Daily Beast!

September 21, 2009
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Backstage at LIVE from the NYPL, with The Daily Beast Image
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All Ages
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Art
Business
History
Language and Literature
Performing Arts
Science
Social Sciences
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September 21, 2009

LIVE Shorts

LIVE from the NYPL programs are long on intellectual content, but these “LIVE Shorts” videos provide short bites suggesting a flavor of the full program.

September 16, 2008
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History of North America
History of the Middle East
History of Europe
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English and American Literature
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June 1, 2009

LIVE from the NYPL

Flash Rosenberg is a freelance photographer and artist-in-residence for LIVE from the NYPL. She draws discussions in front of live audiences to create real time “Conversation Portraits.” These drawings are an amorphous portrait of what it feels like to translate complex ideas into simple lines. She squeezes 90-minute blabs into five- to eight-minute animations, edited by Sarah Lohman.

LIVE Conversation Portraits

Flash Rosenberg is a freelance photographer and artist-in-residence for LIVE from the NYPL. She draws discussions in front of live audiences to create real time “Conversation Portraits.” These drawings are an amorphous portrait of what it feels like to translate complex ideas into simple lines. She squeezes 90-minute blabs into five- to eight-minute animations, edited by Sarah Lohman.

May 13, 2008
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Reference
History
History of North America
United States History
History of the Middle East
History of Europe
Language and Literature
English and American Literature
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June 1, 2009
Now through Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Time and Distance

An exhibition of paintings by

Dan Ault

http://www.artwanted.com/danault

 

DAN AULT

 

Washington Heights Library

September 3 to December 31, 2014

Opening and Artist’s Talk: October 9, 4:30 – 5:30

 

At "Somebody Come and Play" you can see Big Bird, Cookie Monster, Bert and Ernie, the Count, Snuffy, and Oscar up close. And, by my special request, Hoots.

Sesame Street More

Sesame Street began with a simple yet revolutionary question: Can television be used to teach young children? Sesame Street founders Joan Ganz Cooney and Lloyd Morrisett set out to answer that question and in the process created a cultural, educational, and media phenomenon. When the show debuted in 1969, its combination of research with creative work revolutionized children's television.

 

When Joan Ganz Cooney conducted her feasibility study on the use of television as an educational tool, she knew that young children watched a great deal of television in the years before they went to school. She knew they responded to slapstick humor, catchy music, and fast-paced, highly visual commercials. She knew that Sesame Street needed to be educational but it also needed to harness some of commercial television's most engaging traits. Cooney needed educational advisors to work with a creative team capable of producing a television show of high production value – a show with sophisticated writing, memorable music, humor, quality animation and film work, and an engaging cast of characters.

 

Luckily, all of these components fell into place in the first year of production and brought about the show's immediate success. Forty-five years later, Sesame Street continues to harness intellectual and creative talent to teach and entertain.

 

Today, the Muppets Jim Henson introduced on Sesame Street have become pop culture icons. Adults still sing “Rubber Duckie” to their kids at bath time, and children are still learning literacy and numeracy, emotional and physical well-being, and respect and understanding from Sesame Street. As Sesame Street celebrates its 45th season, the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts and Sesame Workshop invite you to a behind the scenes look at the production of Sesame Street. Scripts, storyboards, lead sheets, designs, video, and photography from the archives of Sesame Workshop and the Library for the Performing Arts illustrate how Sesame Street enhances early childhood education with the highest of television production values.

 

The exhibit opens with a brief history of the origins of Sesame Street and a look at how it reflects and has been influenced by New York City. From the beginning, Sesame Street was designed as an experimental research project with educational advisors, researchers, and television producers collaborating as equal partners. Of the original team that developed Sesame Street, co-founder Joan Ganz Cooney has said, “Collectively, we were a genius.” The origins of Sesame Street and the immediate success of the show are illustrated through documents from the early planning stages, behind the scenes images from the first year, and early promotional print and video.

 

New York City has long served as an inspiration to the look and feel of Sesame Street. The Upper West Side is home to Sesame Workshop's corporate offices, and the show has taped in various studios around New York City and on location throughout the five boroughs. The brownstone building of 123 Sesame Street, where Sesame Street residents Susan, Gordon, Bert, and Ernie live, was designed to look like the typical middle-income brownstone homes on Amsterdam and Columbus Avenue in the 1970s and 1980s. Today, the set's subway station, laundromat, garbage can (with Oscar inside), and Hooper's Store all take inspiration from New York City neighborhoods. Set blueprints, a replica of the Sesame Street lamp post, Oscar and his trash can, and images of Sesame Street filming on location around New York City bring the set of Sesame Street to life in the gallery.

 

Sesame Street is often cited as the most researched show in television. Sesame Street's curriculum goals work to help build stronger, kinder, and smarter children by focusing on not only literacy, math, and science, but also such topics as executive function, healthy eating, disaster preparedness, and resiliency. Visitors to the gallery will learn how the show's curriculum is established, how curriculum documents are used by writers and producers, and how each segment of the show is tested to ensure it is teaching young children.

 

The center section of the gallery is dedicated to the many creative talents that contribute to Sesame Street – composers, animators, writers, actors, directors, producers, puppeteers, and designers.

 

Much of the memorable, timeless music of Sesame Street was penned by songwriters with backgrounds in Broadway, Off-Broadway, Tin Pan Alley, and television. Joe Raposo and Jeff Moss, the show's first songwriters, brought a musical theater sensibility to the show. Rather than simplifying the music for children's ears, they brought Broadway to kids. Sesame Street's current musical director Bill Sherman, who won a Tony Award for In the Heights in 2008, has recruited a number of Broadway colleagues to compose for the show. Lead sheets and orchestration for classics like “C is for Cookie” and “I Love Trash” are displayed alongside the more recent through-composed segments for “Elmo the Musical”. Video reels in the gallery also feature a number of musical parodies performed by Muppets and celebrity guests over the years.  

 

Since 1969, Sesame Street has commissioned short, commercial-length animation pieces that appeared as interstitials throughout the hour long program. These animations were groundbreaking in the way they borrowed techniques from TV commercials to teach, and for the support the Workshop gave to independent animators and filmmakers. The roster of artists and illustrators who contributed animations include Maurice Sendak, Mo Willems, Harvey Kurtztman, Gahan Wilson, Bud Luckey, Jim Henson, Tee Collins, and William Wegman, to name a few. Animation cels, storyboards, and claymation models demonstrate the process of producing animations on the show.

 

When Jim Henson joined Sesame Street in 1968, he created a cast of Muppets especially for the show. Big Bird, Oscar the Grouch, Bert, and Ernie injected vitality, humor, and fantasy onto the street. He also brought a team of talent to work on the show – puppet builders, designers, and puppeteers, who have all contributed incredible skills to bring the Muppets to life. Big Bird, Snuffy, and a host of Sesame Street characters are on display here. Original sketches, style guides, behind the scenes footage, and set photography show the craft and artistry required for making and performing the Muppets.

 

Writing, directing, and producing for Sesame Street is a unique and challenging process. The production of Sesame Street is explained through video and accompanying artifacts that follow a day in the life of a Sesame Street segment: beginning with a curriculum need; followed by the collaboration between research, writers, directors, and producers to create and tape a segment; and ending with the distribution of the finished segment across multiple platforms. Marked-up edited scripts, art director storyboards, and footage of the production team at work on the set are also on view.

 

Visitors can learn how Sesame Street's mission to reach and teach goes far beyond the television through its outreach efforts and international co-productions. “Talk, Listen, Connect” is Sesame Street's initiative to support military families by helping kids through deployment, combat-related injuries, and the death of a loved one. Its “Healthy Habits for Life” initiative uses Sesame Street Muppets to connect with preschoolers when they are forming their eating, exercise, and hygiene habits – setting them on track for a lifetime of wellness. Sesame Street's presence is also felt around the world. Soon after the success of the show in the United States, foreign countries began asking the Workshop to help them create their own versions of Sesame Street. Today, Sesame Street reaches more than 150 countries and continually works with countries to produce a number of co-productions. Each co-production is a collaboration with local educational experts, producers, writers, musicians, and puppeteers, resulting in a fully local Sesame Street with its own name, language, curriculum, and Muppets.

 

Put down the duckie and pick up a book! Draw your favorite Muppet on the giant chalk wall. Capture the moment in the Sesame Street photo booth. Explore the apps, hours of video, and more. Join us to experience Sesame Street as you have never seen it before, whether you are a child, or a child at heart.


 

For additional information on Sesame Street, please visit sesamestreet.org or sesameworkshop.org. You can tune in weekdays on PBS or watch anytime on youtube/sesamestreet.

 

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