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Acclaimed Multi-Instrumentalist Peter Apfelbaum and The New York Hieroglyphics to Perform Free Jazz Concert at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts on November 13

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The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts will conclude its free Duke Jazz Series with a performance by acclaimed jazz pianist, tenor saxophonist, drummer, and composer Peter Apfelbaum and The New York Hieroglyphics on November 13 at 7:30 p.m. The performance will be held in the Bruno Walter Auditorium, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center, 40 Lincoln Center Plaza.Doors open at 7:00 p.m. and performances begin at 7:30 p.m.All concerts in the Duke Jazz Series are free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis.For information, please call (212) 642-0142.

Peter Apfelbaum has made an impact on the avant garde jazz and world music scene since the late 1970s and 1980s. He is a well-known multi-instrumentalist and composer. His primary instruments are tenor saxophone, piano, and drums, but he has recorded and performed with a diverse array of percussion, wind, and other instruments. In 1977, while a senior at Berkeley High in California, Apfelbaum formed the 17-piece Hieroglyphics Ensemble as a vehicle for composing and exploring non-traditional musical forms. The band was initially largely comprised of fellow classmates. Apfelbaum would leave and return to the ensemble several times throughout the eighties and nineties as he worked on individual projects and traveled to New York and Europe to perform. In February of 2003 Apfelbaum formed the 11-piece New York Hieroglyphics, adding a second guitarist, Viva De Concini, and four original Hieroglyphics members who had moved east: Peck Allmond (trumpet, reeds), Tony Jones (tenor sax), Jessica Jones (alto and tenor sax) and Norbert Stachel (baritone and bass sax, flute). In 2005 the band would release their album It Is Written.

For the past year and a half, the Duke Jazz Series has presented five free concerts, featuring jazz ensembles selected from the Chamber Music America’s “New Works” program. This series is part of the two-year Library for the Performing Arts project funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to present, document, and preserve jazz, contemporary dance, and theater performances and related oral histories.

All concerts in the Duke Jazz Series are free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis.
The Doris Duke Charitable Foundation has awarded a two-year, $1 million grant to The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts to support the preservation of performing arts works and related oral histories through the audio and visual documentation of jazz, contemporary dance, and theater performances by artists or organizations previously funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation; the creation of oral and video histories involving Foundation-supported artists and organizations; and the preservation of recently acquired, fragile, and deteriorating archival material related to the life and work of Martha Graham.

The grant, which began in February 2008 and continues until January 31, 2010, will enable the Library to record approximately 25 live jazz, contemporary dance, and theater performances by artists or organizations, and conduct and record approximately 40 oral histories with notable performing arts personalities responsible for or related to those performances. Additionally, the Library will preserve 70 hours of oral histories related to the life and work of dancer/choreographer Martha Graham.

About the Jazz Section of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Grant
During the two years of the grant, the Music Division will present eight live performances by jazz ensembles recognized by Chamber Music America’s “New Works” program, which is supported by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.Each live performance will be recorded in both video and audio formats and added to the Division’s archive, as will a subsequently created oral history of key musicians, composers, and other influential figures related to each recorded live performance. In addition to discussing their careers and accomplishments, individual composers and musicians will also examine the commissioning process and the efforts involved in the collaborative creation and performance of the commissioned works, an area not often documented in oral history recordings.

The Library’s Music Division, in partnership with the GRAMMY Museum and Recording Academy, will also present the Duke Jazz Talks, one-on-one conversations between GRAMMY-nominated or GRAMMY-winning jazz artists and music curator and scholar Bob Santelli, Executive Director of the GRAMMY Museum.Duke Jazz Talks begin this fall at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. In addition, the Music Division will conduct 10 oral histories with musicians who will be performing in the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 Jazz at Lincoln Center seasons.

About the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation
The mission of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation is to improve the quality of people's lives through grants supporting the performing arts, environmental conservation, medical research and the prevention of child maltreatment, and through preservation of the cultural and environmental legacy of Doris Duke’s properties

About The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts houses the world’s most extensive combination of circulating, reference, and rare archival collections in its field. Its divisions are the Circulating Collections, Jerome Robbins Dance Division, Music Division, Billy Rose Theatre Division, and the Rodgers and Hammerstein Archives of Recorded Sound. The materials in its collections are available free of charge, as are a wide range of special programs, including exhibitions, seminars, and performances. An essential resource for everyone with an interest in the arts – whether professional or amateur – the Library is known particularly for its prodigious collections of non-book materials such as historic recordings, videotapes, autograph manuscripts, correspondence, sheet music, stage designs, press clippings, programs, posters, and photographs.

About The New York Public Library
The New York Public Library was created in 1895 with the consolidation of the private libraries of John Jacob Astor and James Lenox with the Samuel Jones Tilden Trust. The Library provides free and open access to its physical and electronic collections and information, as well as to its services. Its renowned research collections are located in the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street; The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center; the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem; and the Science, Industry and Business Library at 34th Street and Madison Avenue. Eighty-seven branch libraries provide access to circulating collections and a wide range of other services in neighborhoods throughout the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island. Research and circulating collections combined total more than 50 million items. In addition, each year the Library presents thousands of exhibitions and public programs, which include classes in technology, literacy, and English for speakers of other languages. All in all The New York Public Library serves more than 17 million patrons who come through its doors annually and millions more around the globe who use its resources at www.nypl.org.

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Contact: Jon Pace| 212.592.7700 |Jonathan_Pace@nypl.org

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