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Conversations from the Cullman Center, LIVE from the NYPL: What Happens Now? A Conversation on the 2008 Election

November 10, 2008

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As The New York Review of Books turns 45, the evening will feature some of the publication's most illustrious contributors including former Cullman Center Fellow and Melville scholar Andrew Delbanco; journalist, essayist, and novelist Joan Didion; author and economistJeff Madrick; writer Darryl Pinckney; journalist Michael Tomasky; historian Garry Wills; and others. Moderated by The New York Review of Books editor Robert B. Silvers.

This event is co-presented with

 

 

photos of Joan Didion by ?BrigitteLacombe and Garry Wills by Joe Schuyler

 

About Andrew Delbanco

 Andrew Delbanco is the Julian Clarence Levi Professor Chair in the Humanities and Director of the American Studies program at Columbia University. His most recent book is Melville: His World and Work. Hailed as ?America?s Best Social Critic? by Time Magazine, Delbanco, writes regularly for The New York Review of Books, The New Republic, The New York Times Magazine, and other journals. He was a member of the inaugural class of fellows at the Library?s Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. Delbanco?s new book, College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be, will be published in 2010.

 

 

About Joan Didion

Joan Didion is a journalist, essayist, and novelist. She has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1973 and is the author of, most recently, The Year of Magical Thinking, winner of the 2005 National Book Award for nonfiction, and We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live: Collected Nonfiction.

  

About Jeff Madrick

Jeff Madrick is a former economics columnist for The New York Times and editor of Challenge Magazine. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books for more than a dozen years, is visiting professor of humanities at The Cooper Union and senior fellow of the Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis, The New School. His latest book is The Case for Big Government.

 

 

   

About Darryl Pinckney

Darryl Pinckney is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and is the author of the novel, High Cotton, which won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for First Fiction; Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature; and Sold and Gone: African American Literature and U.S. Society. He received the Vursell Award for Distinguished Prose from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1994.

 

 

 

About Robert B. Silvers

Robert B. Silvers is the editor of The New York Review of Books. He was a founding co-editor with Barbara Epstein with whom he worked for over forty years, beginning in 1963, until her death in 2006. He has edited several essay anthologies featuring New York Review contributors, including The Consequences to Come: American Power After Bush in 2008.

 

 

  

 

About Michael Tomasky

Michael Tomasky is Editor of Guardian America, The Guardian's American Website. He is also a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books. Tomasky is the author of Left for Dead: The Life, Death, and Possible Resurrection of Progressive Politics in America, a study of the intellectual collapse of the American left, and of Hillary's Turn: Inside Her Improbable, Victorious Senate Campaign, a chronicle of Clinton's successful 2000 election to the Senate.

 

   

About Garry Wills

Garry Wills is the author of What Jesus Meant, What Paul Meant, Papal Sin, and Why I am a Catholic. He is the translator of Saint Augustine?s Confessions and author of The Rosary. His works on American history have received many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize for Lincoln at Gettysburg. He writes for The New York Review of Books and is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern University. His new book is What The Gospels Meant.