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The Cullman Center Institute for Teachers

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Illustration by Gary PanterIllustration by Gary PanterThe Cullman Center Institute for Teachers offers two distinct programs for professional development that give teachers an opportunity to enrich their understanding of the humanities and research in one of the world's great libraries. The Institute is located in The New York Public Library's landmark building on Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street at The Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers.

Our Spring Seminars, which last a day, are free. Breakfast and lunch are included.

Summer Seminars last a week. Participants receive a $300 stipend, all required books and materials, a private office with networked computer at the Cullman Center, and breakfast and lunch each day. There is also an opportunity to receive graduate credit through Adams State College. Click here for details.

Space is limited. Any full-time teacher, school librarian, or administrator is welcome to apply; priority is given to public school teachers in the New York metropolitan area.

Special funding for the Cullman Center's Institute for Teachers is generously provided by Helen and Roger Alcaly and the Gilder Lehrman Institute for American History.

The Cullman Center is made possible by a generous endowment from Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman in honor of Brooke Russell Astor, with major support provided by Mrs. John L. Weinberg, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Estate of Charles J. Liebman, John and Constance Birkelund, The Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation, and additional gifts from The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, Helen and Roger Alcaly, Mel and Lois Tukman, The Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation, The Rona Jaffe Foundation, William W. Karatz, Mary Ellen von der Heyden, The Arts and Letters Foundation, Merilee and Roy Bostock, Lybess Sweezy and Ken Miller, and Cullman Center Fellows.

The deadline to apply to our 2014 Spring Seminars has passed, but you can view the course descriptions and dates here. 

2014 Summer Seminars

The deadline to apply to our 2014 summer seminars has passed. Thank you to all those who have applied.

 

 

Slow Looking: A Nonfiction Writing Workshop with Graciela Mochkofsky

Monday, July 14, 2014, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
In this workshop, participants will exercise their observational skills in order to write descriptive nonfiction. To sharpen our senses, we will study examples of great descriptive writing from authors such as Ryszard Kapuściński, John McPhee, Janet Malcolm, Emmanuel Carrère, Hans Magnus Enzensberger, Joseph Mitchell, Gitta Sereny, and Elif Batuman. Participants will go out into New York to do their own observing and recording, and then write descriptions of increasing complexity, starting with a single object, moving on to a person, a situation, and finally a scene with multiple Read More ›

Making the Supernatural Real: A Creative Writing Workshop in Fiction with Téa Obreht

Monday, July 21, 2014, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
In this workshop, we will examine some basic techniques of storytelling. Using a wide range of texts, from folktales to Flannery O’Connor, Poe to Kelly Link, Gabriel García Márquez to Karen Russell, we will explore how the bizarre, the mythical, and the supernatural work in a fictional narrative. Daily writing exercises will help each participant compose a short piece of fiction, which will be discussed at the end of the week in a marathon workshop.Read More ›

Made in America: Viewing our Built Environments as Primary Documents with Elizabeth Blackmar

Monday, July 28, 2014, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
The homes and buildings in which we live and work, the parks and places in which we shop and play, and all the roads and byways in between, tell the story of our past. In this seminar we will treat America’s built environments as primary documents that reveal our social history from the 19th century to the present. Among the questions to be considered: How did the 19th century factory influence the design of contemporary kitchens? What does Central Park tell us about America’s evolving notion of “play?” How is the A train connected to segregation? We will read essays by the great Read More ›

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