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All Programs

All events are free unless otherwise noted.

(mm/dd/yyyy)

7 events found.

TimeEventLocationAudience
Saturday, July 21, 2012
11 a.m.ASL-Interpreted Tour of Lunch Hour NYC
Join us for a tour, with interpretation into American Sign Language, of the luscious exhibit: Lunch Hour NYC! The tour will last approximately one hour, will assemble outside the entrance to the Gottesman Exhibition Hall at 11 a.m. No reservations necessary.
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, Gottesman Exhibition HallAdults,
50+,
College & Graduate Students,
Families,
Persons with Disabilities,
Teachers
Friday, August 3, 2012
10 a.m.KidsLIVE presents Tasty Treats with Cookie Monster and Rocco DiSpirito
Take a bite out of the summer with the sweetest monster in the world, Cookie Monster! Sesame Street’s Cookie Monster joins celebrity chef, best selling author and founder of the Now Eat This! food truck, Rocco DiSpirito at The New York Public Library for a special cooking demonstration for children, where Cookie Monster and the audience will learn how to make healthy cookies, and discover that healthy foods can also be delicious. Space is limited, so RSVP now to reserve seats. Please RSVP for…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, Celeste Bartos ForumChildren,
Toddlers (18-36 months),
Pre-schoolers (3-5 years),
School Age (5-12 years),
Families
Thursday, September 20, 2012
5:30 p.m.TeenLIVE presents Johnny Iuzzini
From cold storage in Brooklyn to Ladurée in Paris and Restaurant Jean Georges and Nougatine in NYC, get the sweet scoop on culinary careers and experiences from a James Beard Foundation “Outstanding Pastry Chef of the Year” award winner Johnny Iuzzini. TeenLIVE reaches teens culturally, artistically, inspirationally, technologically, and more with the biggest, best, and the brightest stars. TeenLIVE programs spotlight current cultural trends and important mainstays that inform the lives…
Jefferson Market LibraryTeens/Young Adults (13-18 years)
Thursday, October 11, 2012
1:15 p.m.Is Lunch for Wimps? the History of the Midday Meal
In conjunction with the Exhibition Lunch Hour: NYC - now through February 17 at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue The meal most often eaten in public, lunch has a long history of establishing social status and cementing alliances. A traditional Mongolian proverb advises: “Keep breakfast for yourself, share lunch with your friend and give dinner to your enemy.” From the Ploughman’s lunch in the field to the Power Lunch at the Four Seasons, where, with whom, and up…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Saturday, January 19, 2013
11 a.m.A.S.L-Interpreted Tour of Lunch Hour NYC
Join us for a tour, with interpretation into American Sign Language, of the luscious exhibit: Lunch Hour NYC! The tour will last approximately one hour. Please assemble outside the entrance to the Gottesman Exhibition Hall at 11 a.m. No reservations necessary.
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, Gottesman Exhibition HallAdults,
50+,
School Age (5-12 years),
College & Graduate Students,
Families,
Persons with Disabilities,
Teens/Young Adults (13-18 years)
Thursday, January 24, 2013
1:30 p.m.From Hardtack to Sugar Wafers: How the Civil War Created the Industry for Dainty Biscuits
Cracker bakeries, sugar refineries, candy makers – New York had them all in 1861 when the Civil War began. Once the huge build up of troops began, it meant that many more supplies would be needed to feed them. New York’s robust cracker industry was already making thousands of pounds of hardbreads (the actual name of hardtack) for the city’s shipping industry, but with the start of the war, it meant they would have to ramp up production. With the U. S. government buying up every piece of hardb…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, January 31, 2013
1:15 p.m.Rice: the Immigrant Grain
How and why did rice, primarily long grain white rice, arrive in the British colonies and become big business? Rice origins are Asian and West African, and it is through the movement of Asian and West African populations, whether voluntary or compulsory, that rice eventually became an established staple in US agriculture. US rice consumption continues to increase as immigrants arrive from different rice cultures. From hoppin’john to rice cakes to food truck pilaf to sushi, rice is everywhere…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults

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