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All events are free unless otherwise noted.

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130 events found.

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TimeEventLocationAudience
Saturday, December 10, 2011
2 p.m.T. J. Stiles presents The Rise of the American Corporation - A Tyranny of Capitalists or a Republic of Money?
T.J. Stiles, who won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize and 2009 National Book Award for The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt, will discuss the rise of the modern business corporation and the surprising transformation of the way Americans think and argue about it. The corporation was originally considered a form of government intervention. Conservatives and established merchants favored it as a device for directing economic development and limiting competition; radical Jacksonians conde…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Wednesday, December 14, 2011
6 p.m.The Rise of the New York Skyscraper
The skyscraper is America’s gift to world architecture and New York City is the city of skyscrapers. Some of the most iconic buildings of our time—Flatiron Building, Chrysler Building, Empire State Building, and World Trade Center-- are the icons of our dynamic city. This lecture explores how New York City skyscrapers responded to the technological advances of the 19th and 20th centuries, and how the events of 9/11 created new concerns for the shape and security of new skyscrapers. A writer…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Tuesday, December 20, 2011
1:15 p.m.Asian American Comics in a “Post-Race” Era
Caroline Kyungah Hong presents Asian American Comics in a “Post-Race” Era Though Asian American artists have long been important contributors to US comics, there has been, till recently, an absence of Asian American protagonists and stories. In this talk, Caroline Kyungah Hong will explore an emergent tradition of Asian American graphic narrative that is garnering critical attention and gaining popularity with diverse audiences. Asian American comics often expose the ways in which race and rac…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Tuesday, January 10, 2012
6 p.m.How Episcopal Bishops of the Antebellum and Civil War Years Responded to Slavery
Felder Dorn, writer in residence in the Library’s Wertheim Study, and retired professor of chemistry and Dean Emeritus at Kean University, will offer an analysis of the ways in which bishops in the Episcopal Church confronted slavery during the antebellum and Civil War years. Documentation to support this lecture comes primarily from diocesan journals of the period which recorded the words and reported the actions of the bishops who led dioceses. The episcopates of two prominent bishops wi…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, South Court AuditoriumAdults
Saturday, January 21, 2012
2 p.m.Selling is more of a Habit: Women and Drug Trafficking in North American 1900 to 1970
While contemporary analysis and popular culture had depicted “woman as victim” in international narcotics trafficking, new images have emerged. Women have always been part of the drug trade despite their fetishized representations in popular culture. Using specific examples, Carey discusses how certain women gained financially from the smuggling and peddling of narcotics, and how they were often intimately involved in the planning and execution of the business. Due to historical and economi…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Wednesday, January 25, 2012
1:15 p.m.Tomorrowland: Space Age Cities of the 1960s
Rosemary Wakeman, a writer in residence in the Library’s Allen Room, and Professor of History at Fordham University and Author of The Heroic City: Paris, 1945-1958, will discuss the space age utopian visions of urban life that emerged in the 1960s. The 1960s was an age of optimism and excitement about the future combined with the threat of atomic destruction. The result was a wild assortment of utopian visions of the city that symbolized both fantasies and fears. These space age reveries were a…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Tuesday, January 31, 2012
1:15 p.m.Displaced for Public Utility: the Politics of Post-Colonial Nature Conservation and the Niokolo-Koba National Park, Senegal
Melis Ece, a writer in residence in the Library’s Wertheim Study and Ph.D. candidate in Anthropology at CUNY Graduate Center and writer in residence in the Wertheim Study Room of The New York Public Library, will focus on evictions from the Niokolo-Koba National Park in Senegal to discuss the role of nature conservation in the shaping of the post-Colonial state and the governance of rural areas in Francophone West Africa. Eviction from National Parks led to the displacement of great numbers of p…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Tuesday, February 7, 2012
6 p.m.From the Dreyfus Affair to the Holocaust: The Emergence of Anti-Semitic Conspiracy Theory
Johannes Burgers, a Writer in Residence in the Library’s Wertheim Study and Doctoral Candidate at the Graduate Center CUNY, will present recent historical findings from his dissertation Conspiratorial Modernism: Modernism and Conspiracy Theory in Proust, Joyce, Faulkner, and Musil, which investigates the influence of anti-Semitism on modernist literature. This lecture will cover the extensive transatlantic exchange of anti-Semitic ideas that formed the basis of that influence. The Dreyfus Aff…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, February 16, 2012
1:15 p.m.EVERYBODY’S AUTOBIOGRAPHY: Remarks on Anxiety and Pseudonymity in the work of SØren Kierkegaard and Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman is said to be an anxious man. Or perhaps that is a confused judgment based on speculation over the characters he creates—characters who appear to suffer from anxiety. Or perhaps it is the viewers themselves who experience anxiety in watching Kaufman’s films. Whatever is the case, the anxiety that Kaufman has, reflects, or engenders is not the kind of anxiety we think it is. In fact, Kaufman’s characters embody a kind of anxiety that bears a close resemblance to the anxiety Søren…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Tuesday, February 28, 2012
6 p.m.When Entitlement Becomes Disentitlement: The Myth of the Greedy Geezer
Susan Jacoby, a writer in residence in the Library's Allen Room and author of Never Say Die: The Myth and Marketing of the New Old Age (Pantheon), will discuss the fallacies that have become embedded in public discourse about cutting “entitlement” programs for the old. In this Orwellian discourse, Jacoby argues, entitlement has been transformed into a dirty word. The major fallacy is that there is a “new” old age, in which “90 is the new 50” and baby boomers who live into their late 80s and 90s…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Friday, March 9, 2012
1:15 p.m.Late Eighteenth-Century Feminisms: Mary Wollstonecraft and her Contemporaries
Kathleen Lubey, a researcher at the Library’s Wertheim Study and Assistant Professor of English at St. John’s University, will contextualize Mary Wollstonecraft’s radical calls for gender equality within the intellectual traditions of English women writers in the decades preceding her feminist treatise A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1791). Wollstonecraft’s most visible legacies—her daughter Mary Shelley, and modern feminism itself—make her recognizable in our time as a harbinger of democ…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Friday, March 16, 2012
1:15 p.m.Romantic Fandom
Eric Eisner, a writer in residence at the Library’s Wertheim Study and Associate Professor of English at George Mason University, will explore the role of fandom in nineteenth-century literary culture, focusing on the phenomena of “Shelley-love” and Leigh Hunt’s idea of “book love.” Nineteenth-century readers acted out their passionate attachments to writers and books with sometimes extravagant forms of fandom. Styling themselves lovers of the poet as well as of his poetry, devoted readers of…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, March 22, 2012
1:15 p.m.Vindicating the Writing Woman: Mary Robinson in Dialogue with Godwin and Wollstonecraft
Ashley Cross, a writer in residence in the Library’s Wertheim Study and Associate Professor of English at Manhattan College, will explore poet and novelist Mary Robinson’s personal and literary relationships with William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft, the parents of the author of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley. Just as philosopher William Godwin began courting feminist Mary Wollstonecraft in 1796, he also met the stunning former actress and royal courtesan-turned-author, Mary Robinson. At the tim…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Wednesday, March 28, 2012
1:15 p.m.Mary Shelley’s The Last Man: Sibylline Leaves
Matthew Rowney, a writer in residence in the Library’s Wertheim Study and pre-Doctoral fellow at the Graduate Center of the City of New York, will discuss Mary Shelley’s groundbreaking work in terms of both Shelley’s personal life and of the time in which she lived. In our current moment, where fears of ecological disaster, epidemics, and economic meltdown abound, The Last Man has become a source of increasing attention and interest. Written shortly after the deaths of her husband Percy and fr…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Monday, April 23, 2012
1:15 p.m.Shakespeare - From Stratford-on-Avon to The New York Public Library
Robert Armitage : William Shakespeare - From Stratford-on-Avon to The New York Public Library Discover the world of William Shakespeare at the NYPL on his celebrated birthday. Ponder textual problems in the quartos and folios. Explore illustrated editions of the plays and poems. Experience Shakespearean research through 21st century databases. After the lecture, twenty members of the audience (drawn by lot) are invited to view the Shakespearean holdings, including the First Folio, in the Lib…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Tuesday, April 24, 2012
1:15 p.m.Fathers and Sons in Hamlet
Shakespeare’s preoccupation with the father-son nexus in Hamlet is reflected in early modern English society more largely, where a plethora of texts on the family appeared during the 16th and 17th centuries. This talk will focus on two kinds of these didactic texts: the middle-class family treatise, written by ministers seeking to define the newly Protestant family; and the humanist princely treatise, authored variously by kings and court intellectuals, which articulated one important vision of…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Friday, April 27, 2012
1:15 p.m.The Parable of the Good Samaritan and The Taming of the Shrew
Literary criticism has traditionally found little of religious or biblical import in Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, a play in which the abusive treatment of Katherine—and, by extension, all independent-minded women—has puzzled, troubled, or outraged audiences over the centuries. Indeed, George Bernard Shaw declared that “no man with any decency of feeling can sit it out in the company of women without being extremely ashamed of its lord-of-creation moral.” This lecture calls for a reass…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Friday, May 4, 2012
1:15 p.m.Enacting Innocence: Barack Obama's Speech on Race in the Context of American Exceptionalism
Barack Obama's election has been understood as the culmination of the Civil Rights Movement, tangible proof that the African American community's pursuit of full equality in America has reached a high-water mark. The key to Obama's election, however, was not the calls for reform that characterized the rhetoric of the Civil Rights Movement, but a ceaseless invocation of American exceptionalism that supported - indeed reinvigorated - the premise of American innocence. This is most evident at the…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Wednesday, May 9, 2012
1:15 p.m.Cogito Interruptus: Descartes and Princess Elisabeth on Life, Love and Growing Old
Rene DescartesWhat do thinkers think about when they’re not “thinking”? Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and René Descartes shared an intense correspondence in which they discussed Descartes’ revolutionary Cogito -- “I think therefore I am” -- but also the pleasures and pains of daily life in some intimate detail. Inspired by their letters, we have set out to rethink, with them, the usual story of “Cogito sum” in terms of “Cogito Interruptus.” Focusing on the debate between the young princess a…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, South Court AuditoriumAdults
Friday, May 18, 2012
1:15 p.m.Antisemitism, Italian Style: The Italian Royal Academy, 1938-1943
Paul Arpaia, a writer in residence in the Library’s Wertheim Study and Associate Professor of History at Indiana University of Pennsylvania and Fellow at the American Academy of Rome (FAAR08), examines reactions among members of the Italian Royal Academy to private and state-sponsored anti-Semitism through the fall of Mussolini. The promulgation of the Racial Laws in 1938 marked a first attempt at state-sponsored anti-Semitism in unified Italy. Studies on Fascism have emphasized fundamenta…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Wednesday, May 23, 2012
1:15 p.m.Unruly Princess: Margit of Hungary, a Medieval Saint and her Disappointed Suitor
Marcelle Thiébaux will talk about the life of the medieval girl who--as an infant--is credited with turning away the savage Tartar hordes of Batu Khan. Dr. Thiébaux's historical novel, Unruly Princess, is based on actual persons and events. January 2012 marked the 770th anniversary of Margit's birth. Dr. Thiébaux is the author of books on medieval literature, among them The Stag of Love: The Chase in Medieval Literature; The Writings of Medieval Women; and Dhuoda: Handbook for her War…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Tuesday, June 5, 2012
1:15 p.m.A Greener Big Apple: How Citizens And Government Are Creating a More Sustainable Gotham
Donovan Finn, Visiting Assistant Professor of Sustainability Studies and Environmental Planning at Stony Brook University, will examine efforts to make NYC a more environmentally sustainable, equitable and livable city. Since the release of its PlaNYC sustainability framework in 2007, New York City’s policy agenda has been largely shaped by the plan’s ambitious environmental goals, while community activists have likewise initiated a host of parallel initiatives across the 5 boroughs. This talk…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Tuesday, June 12, 2012
1:15 p.m.Watchmakers, Hippies, and the World Economic Summit: Three Magic Mountains and the Birth of Today's World in Switzerland
Damion Searls, writer and translator, will explore the surprising cultural, artistic, and scientific renaissance in early-twentieth-century Switzerland. From Albert Einstein and Carl Jung to Rilke, Lenin, modern dance, and personality testing, Switzerland a century ago was a hotbed of innovative ideas that still shape our world today. This talk and extensive slideshow will focus on three of the “magic mountains” where these peaceful revolutions took place: La-Chaux-de-Fonds in the Jura, birthpl…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Tuesday, July 10, 2012
1:15 p.m.The Individual after Stalin : Writers, Diaries, and the Reform of Soviet Socialism.  
Anatoly Pinsky, a writer in residence in the Library's Wertheim Study and adjunct assistant professor at the City College of New York, will present an overview of his book project, The Individual after Stalin: Writers, Diaires, and the Reform of Soviet Socialism. Pinsky's study examines an ideal of individuality formulated by reformist writers in the Khrushchev-era USSR, and casts its popular embrace as the primary imperative of so-called de-Stalinization. The project centers on the writers' u…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Tuesday, July 17, 2012
1:15 p.m.Immigrant Artists and Their Studios in New York City, 1930s-1940s
Francesca Canadé Sautman is a Professor in the Department of Romance Languages at Hunter College of the City University of New York. She has published books and articles mostly in medieval and early modern studies, and has also written on Italian American culture. She will speak about the cultural life of immigrant artists’ studios in New York City in the 1930s and 1940s. This talk evokes the vibrant world of immigrant and first-generation American artists from the 1920s to the 1930s and 1940s…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Tuesday, July 24, 2012
1:15 p.m.Eliza Lynch and the Gold of Paraguay
In 1854, an Irish courtesan named Eliza Lynch hooked up in Paris with Francisco Solano Lopez, the monumentally rich and massively egomaniacal son of Carlos Antonio Lopez, the dictator of Paraguay. Over the next 16 years, she bore him seven children and, some say, goaded him into the bloodiest war in South American history. She may have, in the process, stolen the gold and jewels known as the treasure of the country. The answer to what really happened to the fortune is nowhere to be found, but…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, September 13, 2012
1:15 p.m.George Romney Republican: The Rise and Fall of Mitt's Political Mentor
From his 1962 election as Michigan governor until he withdrew two weeks before the 1968 New Hampshire primary, George Romney was a leading candidate for the Republican presidential nomination. But the successful auto executive who got into politics preaching nonpartisan citizen participation was overwhelmed by his inconsistencies and antagonized Republican colleagues--both conservative and liberal. Going beyond his "brainwashing" gaffe, author John R. Bohrer, a writer in residence in the Library…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, September 27, 2012
1:15 p.m.One Minister, Two Sleazebags and the Ku Klux Klan in North Dakota in the 1920s
In 1915, a feckless and perverse romantic with a yen for the bottle on a hilltop outside of Atlanta, Georgia resuscitated the original and notorious Ku Klux Klan. With a small cohort of anti-Semites, Colonel Simmons tried to recruit new members throughout the South, but with few resources, he had only limited success and in 1920 the KKK was close to collapse. Then he met two public relations people in Atlanta. In short order they built an infrastructure and shaped a marketing strategy that wou…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, October 4, 2012
1:15 p.m.Books Are Weapons in the War of Ideas: Celebrating Banned Book Week and the Freedom to Read Freely
Author Mike Edison, a self-described “free speech zealot” & who has worked for some of the world’s most notorious magazines, will celebrate, with Gary Lucas, the American Library Association’s Banned Book Week with a spirited presentation - part lecture & part performance, guaranteed to be as informational & inspirational as it is entertaining. Edison, a writer in residence in the Library’s Allen Room, will discuss America’s sordid history of banned books, censorship, the First Am…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, October 11, 2012
1:15 p.m.Is Lunch for Wimps? the History of the Midday Meal
In conjunction with the Exhibition Lunch Hour: NYC - now through February 17 at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building at 42nd Street and Fifth Avenue The meal most often eaten in public, lunch has a long history of establishing social status and cementing alliances. A traditional Mongolian proverb advises: “Keep breakfast for yourself, share lunch with your friend and give dinner to your enemy.” From the Ploughman’s lunch in the field to the Power Lunch at the Four Seasons, where, with whom, and up…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, October 18, 2012
1:15 p.m.The Road to New Orleans starts in 1752: Seven Years' War Roots in the War of 1812
Imperial disputes over territory, Native Americans fighting to retain their land, British redcoats and American backwoodsmen, Americans celebrating belonging to “a great empire.” These terms can all describe the War of 1812 as well as the Seven Years’ War (commonly called “the French and Indian War”), which raged from 1752 to 1765. Christian Ayne Crouch brings these two episodes together in order to trace commonalities between the conflicts over time and to suggest how the first war created b…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, October 25, 2012
1:15 p.m.The Science of the Founding Fathers
The Founding Fathers’ degrees of faith differed widely one from another. What they shared more universally was a deep belief in Enlightenment “natural philosophy” and the scientific method. For them the establishment of the United States of America was “an experiment,” in the full scientific sense of that phrase. This aspect of American history is largely unknown to the public. While we have heard of Benjamin Franklin’s electricity experiments, we have no idea who and what made the experiments…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, November 1, 2012
1:15 p.m.Canceled
Innocence
A writer in residence in the Library's Allen Room, Mark Lilla is an essayist and historian of ideas at Columbia University in New York City. A frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books, the New Republic, and the New York Times, he is best known for his books The Reckless Mind: Intellectuals in Politics and The Stillborn God: Religion, Politics, and the Modern West. After holding professorships at New York University and the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago, he…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, November 15, 2012
1:15 p.m.A Salad Story: In the Beginning, long ago, there was Lettuce - Judith Weinraub
In conjunction with Lunch Hour: NYC - exhibit at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, until February 17, 2013 When given the opportunity to choose a subject for a series of global food histories, Judith Weinraub looked for something that hadn't already been written about extensively, such as chocolate or spices or salt. She chose Salads, not fully understanding how complicated the subjec was. Soon enough, she realized the difficulty of defining just what a salad is and has been throughout histor…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, November 29, 2012
1:15 p.m.Charles Dickens: Speaking in Pictures
In conjunction with the exhibit Charles Dickens: The Key to Character, September 14 through January 27. The stories of Charles Dickens (1812–1870) appeal to the child inside every reader because his characters are easily visualized by the mind’s eye. Influenced by the fairy tales Dickens read in his youth, his villains tend to be exaggeratedly wicked, while heroes and heroines wear almost saintly auras. Dickens distorts descriptions of characters’ features and dress, speech and gestures, to su…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults,
Book Lovers
Thursday, December 6, 2012
1:15 p.m.James Lenox and the Origins of The New York Public Library
The New York Public Library, which opened in 1911, had two predecessors—the Lenox on upper Fifth Avenue where the Frick Collection now stands and the Astor housed in the landmark building occupied by the Public Theater. The two libraries differed from one another and from what was to follow. The Astor was essentially a non-lending library and reading room for the citizens of New York, while the Lenox was a treasure house of rare books and works of art. Avowedly a gift to the citizens of New Yor…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults,
Book Lovers
Thursday, December 13, 2012
1:15 p.m.Building to Impress: New York Skyscrapers and the People who Commissioned Them - Seth Gopin
The development of the skyscraper is an American story. Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centures, these great edifices have defined both New York City and American architecture. Less often discussed are the patrons and architects of these great buildings. This lecture explores the story of the fascinating people who were the forces behind nine iconic New York buildings - Flatiron, Metropolitan Life, Woolworth, Chrysler, Empire State, Seagram's, AT&T, Conde Nast, and Hearst buildin…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, December 20, 2012
1:15 p.m.Why Our Society Likes Vampires: their Moral Struggle – and Ours
Starting as a meditation on mortality after the illness and death of her late husband, Margot Adler, correspondent at NPR and author, began to obsessively read vampire novels. She has now read more than 230 vampire novels - from teen to adult, from detective, to romance, from gothic to modern. Although it started as a look at issues of mortality, none of that explained the seven billion dollars Hollywood spent on vampire movies in the last two years. "Every society creates the vampire it needs,…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults,
Book Lovers,
Teens/Young Adults (13-18 years)
Thursday, January 10, 2013
1:15 p.m.Why Hitler Lost
Why did the Axis lose the Second World War? Examining the Second World War on every front, Roberts asks whether, with a different decision-making process and a different strategy, the Axis might even have won. Were those German generals who blamed everything on Hitler after the war correct, or were they merely scapegoating their former Führer once they could criticize him with impunity? That war lasted for 2,174 days, cost $1.5 trillion and claimed the lives of over 50 million people. Why di…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
Thursday, January 24, 2013
1:30 p.m.From Hardtack to Sugar Wafers: How the Civil War Created the Industry for Dainty Biscuits
Cracker bakeries, sugar refineries, candy makers – New York had them all in 1861 when the Civil War began. Once the huge build up of troops began, it meant that many more supplies would be needed to feed them. New York’s robust cracker industry was already making thousands of pounds of hardbreads (the actual name of hardtack) for the city’s shipping industry, but with the start of the war, it meant they would have to ramp up production. With the U. S. government buying up every piece of hardb…
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, General Research DivisionAdults
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