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Ask the Author: Mark Strand

Mark Strand answers our six questions about reading.Read More ›

September Reader's Den: Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely, Part 1

I often find myself amazed by how weird humans are, so I appreciate books that prove we're all nuts. In the interest of sharing these hilarious, intriguing, and helpful case studies, this month I will be leading the Reader's Den in discussing the book Predictably Irrational, by Dan Ariely.Read More ›

Beautiful Oops! Finding Success in Mistakes

Did you ever consider the notion that mistakes might be a gateway to ingenuity that can propel further breakthroughs, rather than mere blunders? Here is a list of reading recommendations that might help you start to view mistakes in a new light.Read More ›

Before Kermit, There Was Catesby

My devotion to Kermit has led to a love for frogs in print as well, from Arnold Lobel's Frog and Toad books to Ken Kimura's 999 Frogs. And whenever I examine illustrated natural histories in the Rare Book Division where I work, I'm always on the lookout for Kermit's amphibious ancestors.Read More ›

Undetectable Flash Collective

In order to foster a community conversation about HIV and AIDS in dialogue with the Library’s major archives on the history of the AIDS crisis, The New York Public Library is hosting a project to create site-specific installations in four library branches—across the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island—that explore the ways that HIV and AIDS are currently affecting these local New York City communities.Read More ›

In Praise of Hoots

At "Somebody Come and Play" you can see Big Bird, Cookie Monster, Bert and Ernie, the Count, Snuffy, and Oscar up close. And, by my special request, Hoots.Read More ›

Lives of the Famous and Infamous: Collective Biographies For Teens

Some of my favorite nonfiction books to recommend to teenagers are collective biographies, which provide information about different people who were famous for different reasons. They’re good for homework, good for browsing, and good for spontaneously discovering people you’ve never heard of before.Read More ›

Job and Employment Links for the Week of September 29

Please note this blog post will be revised when more recruitment events for the week of September 29 are available.Read More ›

Fashion, The High Life, and "The Duties of Married Females": 19th Century Fashion-Plate Magazines

The Art & Architecture Collection has a large collection of women’s (and some men’s) 19th century fashion-plate periodicals. While French fashion dominated the 19th century this post features a selection of magazines from England, America and Sweden. Read More ›

Department of Labor: Latinos Should Lead on Paid Leave

This is the U.S. Department of Labor blog post authored by Vanessa Cardenas, the vice president of Progress 2050 at American Progress. Vanessa in her blog points out that Latinos continue to play a larger and larger role in the U.S. economy and labor market, however, their basic needs are not being met. It is high time to bring the workplace polices into the 21 st century and help all families succeed. Read More ›

Contemporary Southern Writers

Seven recent books by Southern writers.Read More ›

The Boy from Kalamazoo

To honor Derek Jeter's tenure in the Bronx, I thought it would be nice to pull quotes from journalists who have covered Jeter's career, from Jeter's teammates, and from Jeter himself. Read More ›

Oprah Winfrey's What I Know for Sure

Oprah's new book asks deep questions and makes readers think.Read More ›

Judge a Magazine by Its Cover: "Good Hardware"

This magazine did not deal with hardware in today’s meaning of this word. In the October 1921 issue there were articles on sporting goods, electrical goods, sewing machines, auto accessories, window displays, and general pieces on how to sell merchandise. Read More ›

Guess Who's Leading on Paid Leave?

This is the U.S. Department of Labor blog post authored by Tom Perez, Secretary of Labor. He states that in building an economy that works for everyone, that means investing in the middle class, rewarding hard work and responsibility, ensuring that everyone has a chance to succeed. Paid leave has to be at the center of those efforts.Read More ›

"It Changed My Life Forever" Job Corps Stories

The following is the U.S. Department of Labor blog post. Three Job Corps graduates discuss how Job Corps helped them overcome adversity and succeed.Read More ›

Booktalking "Tasting the Universe" by Maureen Seaberg

The phenomenon of experiencing associated senses (a kind of cross-wiring) is an old concept, but it has only been scientifically studied since the second half of the 20th Century. Read More ›

The Banned Books We Love

Seven librarians' favorite challenged titles.Read More ›

Where in New York is Sesame Street?

Can I tell you how to get to Sesame Street? Well, I can try. You can get to the Sesame Street Subway Stop by the A, B, 1, or 2 trains, which if you check any MTA map, do not intersect at any current station.Read More ›

A Woman's Place - in Tech

This is the U.S. Department of Labor blog post authored by Latifa Lyles, Director of the Women's Bureau. Read More ›
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