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Great Kills Book Discussion: Ronald Kessler's The First Family Detail

Ronald Kessler’s The First Family Detail provides riveting and highly astonishing facts as well as firsthand accounts of agents whose role is to protect United States Presidents and their families.Read More ›

Podcast #58: Frank Bruni on College

In this week’s episode, Bruni discusses the pitfalls of believing that elite schools are the sole path to a great life, why people put too much faith in the annual U.S. News & World Report rankings, and what's worthwhile about college.Read More ›

Essential Longform: The Best Harper Lee Reads

This year, on April 28, Lee will turn 89. She will publish her second novel, Go Set a Watchman in July. As we await this much-anticipated encore, we're looking at the beloved author who told us that real courage was “when you know you're licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and see it through no matter what.”Read More ›

Ask the Author: Danette Vigilante

Danette is the author of The Trouble With Half a Moon, a 2012-2013 Sunshine State Young Readers award nominee and Saving Baby Doe, a 2014 pick for the New York Public Library’s 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing list. We were given the opportunity to ask Danette a few questions; here is what we found out!Read More ›

Booktalking "Goal!" by Mina Javaherbin

Ajani and friends play football in South Africa... after he has finished his homework and gotten water from the well.Read More ›

Salute to Narrative Nonfiction: Travel and Adventure

Narrative or creative nonfiction is a somewhat newly recognized genre. Naturally, as librarians we have a great appreciation for the research, the primary source documents and interviews, but it is the narrative, the skillful pacing, the phrasing, and the insight that make it read like a thriller that set these books apart from other nonfiction. Read More ›

Outlaw Baseball! The Federal League of 1914-1915

The baseball season is underway, and this year marks the 100th anniversary of the folding of the Federal League.Read More ›

Job and Employment Links for the Week of April 26

Job openings and recruitment events this week for home health aides, security, drivers, nurses and more.Read More ›

Booktalking "The Summer of May" by Cecilia Galante

May and Olive text each other all day long. May's fiery temperament is calmed by Olive's gentle ways; they seem to complement each other... until they stop understanding each other.Read More ›

Remembering Our Ancestors: Maps and Genealogy Resources for Armenian-Americans

As an Armenian-American keenly aware of the devotion to lost homeland of my ethnic compatriots, I’ve always been on the lookout for Armenians among the researchers from many large ethnic groups who have found their way to the Map Division. April 24 is the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the Armenian Genocide, and one way to honor those who were not able to find refuge is to learn all we can about them and celebrate our link to them.Read More ›

Standing Down: From Warrior to Civilian Book List

The Bronx Library Center is one of several libraries hosting an initiative to develop reading and discussion programs for veterans, as well as their families, friends, service providers, and caregivers.Read More ›

Children's Literary Salon in Retrospect: Judaism

The event was hosted by Betsy Bird, Youth Materials Specialist, and it featured Marjorie Ingall from Tablet Magazine, Joanna Sussman from Kar-Ben Publishing, and Barbara Krasner from the Sydney Taylor Book Award Committee.Read More ›

April Quotes From Your Favorite Literature

While Shakespeare aligned April with youth and vitality, Eliot called it “the cruelest month.” Melville compared April to a red-cheeked dancing girl, and Millay even titled one collection Second April. Here are a few of our favorite April quotes in literature.Read More ›

Meet Our Visible Lives Oral History Project Volunteers!

This is a guest post by Joanne Dillon, interviewer for Visible Lives: Oral Histories of the Disability Experience at Andrew Heiskell Braille and Talking Book Library.Read More ›

Booktalking "Dear Wandering Wildebeest" by Irene Latham

African animals grace the pages of this thoughtfully illustrated book.Read More ›

The Case of the False Quixote

I recently came across a third volume of Don Quixote. Cervantistas among you know that this novel, the full title of which is El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha, consists of two parts only. What’s more, the author listed is not Cervantes, but “the Licentiate Alonzo Fernandez de Avellaneda.” So what exactly is going on here?Read More ›

Podcast #57: T.C. Boyle on Finding Stories and Themes

T.C. Boyle has written over a dozen novels and several collections of short fiction. Recently, he was awarded the Robert Kirsch Award for lifetime achievement for writers of the West. On April 1, we welcomed Boyle to Books at Noon to discuss his latest novel The Harder They Come. This week for the New York Public Library Podcast, we present the author speaking on finding stories, discovering creative writing, and observing themes emerge in his body of work. Read More ›

Ask the Author: Jorie Graham

Jorie Graham has a new collection of her work out this Spring entitled From the New World: Poems 1976-2014. We asked her six questions about what she likes to read.Read More ›

Vladimir Nabokov, écrivain, 1899-1977*

April 22 is the anniversary of his birth. If you haven’t read Nabokov—or if you’ve only read his most famous novel, Lolita—and you love to read books with exquisite language, here are three others to consider.Read More ›

Schomburg Center To Receive Prestigious National Medal for Museum and Library Service

We are excited to announce that the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture will receive the National Medal for Museum and Library Service at a celebration in Washington, D.C., in May! The Schomburg Center is among ten recipients of the National Medal, the nation’s highest honor given to museums and libraries, in recognition of service to the community and for making a difference in the lives of individuals, families, and communities. Read More ›
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