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The Longest Afternoon: Looking Back on Waterloo

Branden Simms has created an inspired work which provides a detailed look at how a small unit conducted itself in this period under extreme duress. His book is not only a military history, but a look at the actual people who took part in these events. He chronicles their lives on an almost hourly basis and we endure with them those momentous events that took place on that sultry afternoon 200 years ago on a small Belgian field. That farmland and structures remain active to this day which are owned by individuals aware of their historical significance. The author was privileged to 

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LVMH Fundamentals in Luxury Retail

Training in luxury retail. Free for qualifying individuals who are unemployed or underemployed.Read More ›

Booktalking "The Worst Princess" by Anna Kemp and Sara Ogilvie

Princess Sue has done all of the right things. She grew her braids long. She waited patiently and looked hopefully out the tower window for her prince.Read More ›

#WorldPhotographyDay

August 19 is #WorldPhotographyDay so here are some recommendations of photography books from our collections.Read More ›

Podcast #74: Colson Whitehead on Poker

For this week's episode of the New York Public Library podcast, Colson Whitehead discusses poker. In 2011, the author traveled to the World Series of Poker, where he competed and reported back for Grantland. Read More ›

New York Times Read Alikes: August 23, 2015

A new thriller from an old favorite took the No. 1 spot this week, with familiar titles rounding out the rest of the list. Read More ›

Booktalking "Pino and the Signora's Pasta" by Janet Pedersen

All of the feral cats of Rome eagerly anticipate the delicious pasta that is regularly brought by the Signora.Read More ›

Summer of Steampunk

High adventure, gears and gadgets, fantastical inventions, Victorian-era settings (or not)… the rise of steampunk gives authors of young-adult fiction rich new ground to tread.Read More ›

Networking To Your Next Job with Lisa Hennig

Helpful information for job searching, as well as networking within your career in order to perform your job better.Read More ›

NYPL @ ITP Innovation Lab

NYPL has digitized hundreds of thousands of objects and artifacts. How can we better integrate these into exhibitions and other experiences in physical spaces? On July 15 – 17, 2015, we had the fantastic opportunity to ask that question of participants in the first ever ITP Innovation Lab. Read More ›

Job and Employment Links for the Week of August 16

Recruitment events and training sessions for the week ahead.Read More ›

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words: Wordless Picture Books

Many parents feel intimidated when they first encounter a wordless picture book. Then the possibilities set in: the child can make up the story, the story can change from reading to reading. Not to mention, the art in these wordless books is stunning.Read More ›

Parenting While Incarcerated: NYPL Program Serves Hundreds Per Year

While The New York Public Library offers a wealth of services for young and old, its Correctional Services Department is quietly, steadfastly, and admirably reaching out within and strengthening our communities. Read More ›

Readers Den: Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy: Interview and Wrap Up

Welcome back to the Reader's Den as we wrap up July's book. I hope you have enjoyed Karen Abbott's book Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy as much as I have. I talked to the author about what she likes to read (when she's not busy writing!)Read More ›

The Best New York City Novels by Neighborhood

For the reader who just can't get enough of those busy city streets, or is just dying to know where exactly in the five boroughs their favorite characters are inhabiting, here is a list of famous New York City-based novels according to the neighborhood in which they take place—complete with an interactive map of nearby landmarks and attractions!Read More ›

Empathy for Animals, On Land and Underseas

This summer, why not explore some great nonfiction science reads about animals, both on land and underseas, and the ways in which they continually surprise humans.Read More ›

Achieving a Lasting Legacy

What will be your legacy? This is a ponderous question, whether one is referring to a legacy as contained in one’s last will and testament, one’s work and/or charitable contributions or the material manifestation of one’s hobbies.Read More ›

STEM Work: An Overview

"STEM 101: Intro to tomorrow's jobs" provides an overview of STEM work, analyzing nearly 100 occupations from a list created by a committee comprising several federal agencies.Read More ›

Beyond Bond

We asked library staff to investigate Ian Fleming's legacy and go “beyond Bond”—to pick out other books starring secret agents.Read More ›

Traveling the Roads of Early America with Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson recorded, measured, and calculated things obsessively. He kept copious notes in his account book on the distances he traversed and the roads he traveled.Read More ›
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