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Author interview with Teri Kanefield: Giving a long-forgotten civil rights heroine her day

"...A teenager took control of the situation when adults couldn't..." 

Barbara Rose Johns was a high school student in 1950's Virginia. After complaining about her school's shoddy state - obviously so much worse off than the local white children's school - she had a teacher respond that she should do something about it. So she did. She organized her schoolmates into a band of leaders, tricked the principal out of school, forged his initials on official notes, rallied classmates with speeches at her own secret school assembly, organized a 

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Guitars, Gigs, Girls (& Guys): Four Lists of Teen Books that Rock!

Books and plots involving music, musicians, fans and bands go together like peanut butter and jelly. In other words, perfectly! They’re pretty much a top 10 sub-genre of YA fiction for me and here’s why.Read More ›

Punk and the [Anti-]Prom

Every year, my interns and I have the pleasure of working with the students at the High School for Fashion Industries in conjunction with the Library’s wonderful Anti-Prom projects, managed by our colleagues in Teen services. Past themes have included Goth, Monsters, Super Heroes, and Glam. This year was Punk.Read More ›

20 of the Most Important Books for Economics before 1940

...and where you can read (most of) them without leaving your computer screen.Read More ›

Booktalking "Art & Max" by David Wiesner

Dinosaur and lizard minds collide in a shared attempt to create art. Arthur decides paint Max a panoply of colors that fragment and shatter all across the page!Read More ›

Job and Employment Links for the Week of June 23

Please note this blog post will be revised when more recruitment events for the week of June 23 are available.Read More ›

Booktalking "Noodle's Knitting" by Sheryl Webster

The joy of making something out of nothing: a snuggly scarf. The little mouse got so wrapped up in knitting that she forgot about everything else! Even sleep. Read More ›

From the Archives of the Century: The Century Foundation & NYC, Part I

In 2012, the Manuscripts and Archives Division acquired the records of the Century Foundation, a non-partisan research institute based in New York City previously known as the Twentieth Century Fund and originally founded as the Cooperative League. Since its founding, the Century Foundation (TCF) has supported the creation and dissemination of progressive policy ideas through the funding of books, position papers, pamphlets, task forces, and conferences that address current issues faced in the United States economy and democracy. The Century Foundation records document the governance of the Read More ›

Electrical Apprenticeships: Opportunity Awaits

Electricians install and maintain electrical power, communications, lighting, and control systems in homes, businesses, and factories. There are different types of electricians, inside electricians maintain and repair large motors, equipment, and control systems in businesses and factories. Residential electricians install wiring and troubleshoot electrical problems in peoples' homes.Read More ›

Transforming Apprenticeships for the 21st Century

Did you know that nearly 400,000 apprenticeships are available nationwide in more than 1,000 occupations according to the U.S. Department of Labor? The average starting salary for an apprentice is $50,000 and apprenticeships also connect education and work simultaneously. In many cases apprentices can gain industry-recognized credentials equivalent of a 2- or 4-year degree.Read More ›

June 2014 Reader's Den: "The Judgment of Paris" by Ross King, Part 3

Other recommended works:

The Girl Who Loved Camellias by Julie Kavanagh The fascinating history of Marie DuPlessis chronicles the life of the courtesan who inspired Alexandre Dumas fils’s novel and play La dame aux camélias, Giuseppe Verdi’s opera La Traviata, George Cukor’s film Camille, and Frederick 

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Teen Author Carnival 2014

I was very excited to learn about the Teen Author Carnival from a colleague's blog. It was held at the regal high-ceilinged Jefferson Market Library. There were many teens in attendance, and some adults joined the crowd later on. The event has been going on since 2009, and it is organized by Mitali Dave. It was a great venue for teens to get the opportunity to meet their favorite authors.

Book Trivia

The program commenced with a Book Trivia Challenge. Three 

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Valentina Tereshkova: The Anniversary of the First Woman in Space

It was 51 years ago to the day, June 16th, 1963, that Valentina Tereshkova left the earth aboard the Vostok 6, and became the first woman to enter outer space.Read More ›

Monster Summer at Muhlenberg Library

All summer long at Muhlenberg Library, we will be delving into all things monster!Read More ›

往事並不如焉 || Wang Shi bing bu ru yan

Chi 895.14 Zhang Li Wang Shi bing bu ru yan == 往事並不如焉: 乱世名伶的戏梦人生Read More ›

Bloomsday in the Berg Collection

James Joyce's Ulysses is a novel unique in the history of English literature, perhaps all literature, in that it has a day dedicated to its celebration all over the world. The day is named for Leopold Bloom, one of the novel's three chief characters.Read More ›

Novedades de Junio 2014: ¡Empezando el verano con un libro a la mano para ayudar a mantener la mente y el cuerpo sano!

La siguiente lista ofrece una variedad de libros recientemente recibidos con historias de interés sobre personalidades ejemplares, y temas sobre la salud y espiritualidad para empezar el verano con la mente y el cuerpo sano.Read More ›

My Library: Alan

Here at the Kingsbridge Library we offer two meditation classes a week, which are among the most popular programs we offer. I recently caught up with Alan, who with his wife, Lioudmila, is one of our class leaders.Read More ›

Swan Song

My job has offered many satisfactions. It is my way of engaging with the world. Although it would be impossible to guess how many people I've encountered in my librarian capacity, I can only hope that I've managed to clear up even a bit of bewilderment and confusion.Read More ›

Lydia Maria Child and Archival Research

By all accounts, Lydia Maria Child should be famous. An author, abolitionist, and advocate for human rights a full generation before that stance became widespread, Child remains an unsung hero—even though we continue to sing her lyrics to “Over the River and Through the Wood.” Read More ›
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