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Reader's Den: The Secret History of Wonder Woman, Part 3

This week, let's take a look at the cultural impact and uses of Wonder Woman through these resources for further reading.Read More ›

Black Life Matters Feature of the Week: Digging in the Vault

Today's Exhibition Feature of the Week comes from Tammi Lawson, our in-house Curator of the Art and Artifacts Division. She shares what inspired her to include the impactful artwork you see in our latest exhibition, Curators' Choice: Black Life Matters. Read More ›

Booktalking "Numbering All the Bones" by Ann Rinaldi

Eulinda is a 13-year-old girl searching for freedom during the Civil War. That didn't happen for her younger brother Zeke, who was recently sold to another master. Read More ›

Jason Reynolds Visits BLC on March 19 @4pm

March 19, 2015 will be a special day for Bronx Library Center teens! Jason Reynolds, Brooklyn-based author will honor us with a visit to talk about his latest book The Boy In The Black Suit, and his work as a writer and poet.Read More ›

The Book on the Book: Biographies of Works of Literature

There has been a mini-boomlet in book biographies recently. Wouldn't you love to read a book about your favorite book?Read More ›

Pi Day of the Century! 3.14.15

What is Pi? It is the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter and a number that has fascinated many for thousands of years because the ratio stays the same whether you are measuring very tiny circles or very large. This year the date corresponds to the first five digits of Pi, 3.14.15—a very special Pi Day!Read More ›

1968: Baseball's "Year of the Pitcher"

1968 was a year of misfortune. Unless you were on the mound.Read More ›

Black Life Matters Feature of the Week: A Bit Of Life

In today's feature of the week, Mary Yearwood, our in-house Curator of the Photographs and Prints Division, discusses the brilliance of renowned shutterbug Richard Saunders, and how he inspired her contribution to the exhibition.Read More ›

Podcast #52: Sarah Lewis and Anna Deavere Smith on Inspiring Failures

Is failure what keeps us going? This is the question Sarah Lewis's The Rise: Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and the Search of Mastery centers around. The author, curator, and historian offers a tantalizing view of near-greatness in her book, which tells the stories of how some of the greatest talents in history grappled with the pursuit of perfection.Read More ›

Job and Employment Links for the Week of March 15

King Teleservices, Domino's, Shleppers, and other recruitment events happening this week.Read More ›

Frank Sinatra’s Flight to the Moon

From his first job at the Rustic Cabin (earning $15 a week) to minting million dollar bills, tracing Sinatra's road to financial success.Read More ›

We Are Warriors: Biographies of Brave Women

It is March and we are again celebrating Women’s History Month. One of our bravest and most beautiful writers (who is also a woman) once wrote: “You may write me down in history / With your bitter, twisted lies, / You may trod me in the very dirt / But still, like dust, I’ll rise.” Here are the titles of biographies of brave warriors (who are also women.)Read More ›

Ask the Author: Frank Bruni

Frank Bruni comes to Books at Noon next Wednesday, March 18 to discuss his latest work, Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be: An Antidote to the College Admissions Mania. We asked him six questions about what he likes to read.Read More ›

ReelAbilities Film Festival Inspires Students at the Library

This year is the 7th Annual Reelabilities: NY Disabilities Film Festival. Organized by the JCC Manhattan, ReelAbilities runs from March 12 through March 18, The Festival will be showcasing award-winning films by and about people with special needs at over thirty venues throughout the New York Metro Area, many of which will be the US or NY Premiere.Read More ›

Why Is New York City Called the Big Apple?

New York is a city of nicknames. The City That Never Sleeps, Empire City, The City So Nice They Named It Twice… and of course Gotham, which we’ve covered before. Today let’s just look at the Big Apple.Read More ›

Peter Hart's "The Great War"

This is a superb military study of the Great War. if you are looking for some new perspectives on the Bloody Fields of Flanders and elsewhere then this seminal work by Peter Hart is a good place to start. Read More ›

Booktalking "A Break With Charity" by Ann Rinaldi

The witch trials are a circus. The afflicted girls, as well as many local residents, attend the trials. The accused witches are not appointed counsel, and their words of defense fall on impatient ears.Read More ›

Meet the Artist: Rossella BLUE Mocerino

The Mulberry Street Library is proud to host the art exhibition "Love, Masks, and Flowers" by Greenwich Village based artist Rossella BLUE Mocerino. A veteran exhibitor of NYPL Libraries, BLUE brings extraodinary color and verve to her work, on display through April 28, 2015. I spoke with the artist about her work. Read More ›

Booktalking "Finishing Becca" by Ann Rinaldi

The Declaration of Independence was penned in 1776. This is Philadelphia in 1778, in the midst of the Rebels and the Loyalists. 14-year-old Becca Syng is sent to work and live as a maid with the spoiled Peggy Shippen, future wife of Benedict Arnold.Read More ›

Lawmen and Badmen: The Tin Star of the Old West

In the early American West, the lawman might be a U.S. marshal, appointed by the Attorney General, or he might be a local sheriff elected to office by the townfolk. The distinction often makes no difference in old Western movies, but is an optimum detail in the pursuit of genealogy and local history research in the Milstein Division, where reference librarians must wrangle between the local, county, state, and federal levels in order to rope in relevant resources for patron requests.Read More ›
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