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Booktalking "Tasting the Universe" by Maureen Seaberg

The phenomenon of experiencing associated senses (a kind of cross-wiring) is an old concept, but it has only been scientifically studied since the second half of the 20th Century. Read More ›

The Banned Books We Love

Seven librarians' favorite challenged titles.Read More ›

Where in New York is Sesame Street?

Can I tell you how to get to Sesame Street? Well, I can try. You can get to the Sesame Street Subway Stop by the A, B, 1, or 2 trains, which if you check any MTA map, do not intersect at any current station.Read More ›

A Woman's Place - in Tech

This is the U.S. Department of Labor blog post authored by Latifa Lyles, Director of the Women's Bureau. Read More ›

Artist Q&A: Ner Beck’s NYC Found Faces & Window Reflections

We welcome back Ner Beck to the Mulberry Street Branch of the New York Public Library for his exhibit NYC Found Faces & Window Reflections, on view through October 31, 2014.Read More ›

Booktalking "Ultraviolet" by R. J. Anderson

Alison Jeffries wakes up at St. Luke's Hospital, her mind foggy from psychotropic meds. From there, it's to Pine Hills, or "Fine Pills," as fellow patients have christened the psychiatric hospital.Read More ›

My Favorite Sesame Street Clip: Kermit and Joey Say the Alphabet

To this day, I laugh when I see it. It's so endearing to me, for a few reasons. Read More ›

Sculpting White Wax: Fatherhood in the Middle Ages

Simon R. Doubleday is researching King Alfonso and the history of fatherhood in the Allen Room.Read More ›

Booktalking "The Girl Who Heard Colors" by Marie Harris

Jillian is a sensory maven. She loves all her senses: taste, smell, touch, vision and hearing. Read More ›

Reading About Book Discussion Groups

October is National Reading Group Month, so let's read something together.Read More ›

400 Years of Banned Books

September 21 – 27 is Banned Books Week, when libraries and other members of the book community support the freedom to read and raise awareness of challenges to this freedom. Sadly, the banning of books is not a new phenomenon—while Catcher in the Rye or Huckleberry Finn come to mind, you can find books banned as early as the sixteenth century in the Rare Book Division.Read More ›

NYPL Ask the Author: Susan Minot

Susan Minot likes to read paper pages and other real things. She comes to Books at Noon on Wednesday, September 24 to discuss her latest work, Thirty Girls.Read More ›

Banned Books Week 2014: Celebrating the Freedom to Read

Programs for families during Banned Books Week.Read More ›

Muppets Run Amok at the Library

In honor of the Sesame Street exhibition at the Library for the Performing Arts, I thought I'd write a bit about some other Jim Henson productions that have stayed with me. Read More ›

A Digitized History of The New York Public Library

The History of the New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations provides a thorough account of 19th century New York City libraries, their consolidation into a unified system, and the construction of NYPL’s central library (now known as the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building).Read More ›

Alphabet Books: As Easy as ABC

It is never too early to read with your child. In fact, earlier this year the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Council on Early Childhood formally recognized the importance of consistent and early exposure to the printed word. Read More ›

What We're Reading: September 2014

I asked and they answered—here's what an assortment of staff across the library are reading right now.Read More ›

10 Pirate Romances for Talk Like a Pirate Day

Heroines on the high seas say "shiver me timbers" for these swashbuckling titles.Read More ›

While You Wait For "The Orphan Train" Why Not Try…

Like The Orphan Train, by Christina Baker Kline, these moving, character-driven titles delve into the subjects of orphans, foster care, family issues, unexpected friendships, secrets, rediscovery and the promise of second chances.Read More ›

X Marks the Spot: The Most Treasured Pirates in Literature

Pirates get a bad rap—and rightfully so! They plunder. They pillage. They, well, pirate. But pirates also have financial savvy (booty-finding skills), cool hardware (swords, hooks, etc.), marketing prowess (skulls and crossbones), and killer diving boards (planks.) Don't let the peg-legged limps fool you: these guys know how to insert themselves in quality yarns. Meet the most memorable swashbucklers on the high seas of literature, and get ready to find a treasure trove of adventures.Read More ›
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